"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 113 · 11 months ago

The Power of Relationship Sales & Marketing with Dusty Sutherland

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

One of the most cost effective ways to grow your business is to build relationships with people in your community. Treating every customer like they are your friends and family.

Now many companies may claim they do this, but in reality, it is all about the transaction, not long term value. There has been a glut of sales training focusing on "relationship sales process" but it just becomes another tactic.

But what if you really executed on the idea? How could you develop your business to be the "go to" business for your product and service. 

In this episode, Dusty Sutherland, military veteran, general sales manager and now head of sales shares his views on how he focused on building relationships in his town, through charity, being present in the community and always leading with a servant's heart. 

He changed the way his community viewed car dealership employees. 

Enjoy the conversation and don't forget to subscribe and share!! 

About Dusty Sutherland

A Kentucky native that grew up on a tobacco farm. He left the farm to serve for over 10 years in the US Navy as a Hospital Corpsman. A combat medic with Marine Corps infantry. 

Developing a calmness under extreme circumstances and developing a mission first mentality transferred well to the car business where he was recently General Sales Manager.

He believes Orienting goals and habits to better serve coworkers, the community and your business is key to empowerment and faith in any process.

He currently is Global Sales Director for Cognition Digital.

Connect with Dusty: https://bit.ly/3DuLrLE 

About Glenn Pasch:

"Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.

Let’s Connect:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

Support for this episode comes from PCG digital. It is anywhere from difficult to impossible to manage every aspect of the changing digital landscape. Rather than trying to do it yourself, why not leave it to an award winning team of Digital Marketing Specialists who have mastered at all connect to your message with more potential customers with PCG digital. Go to PCG digitalcom for more information. One of the best ways and most cost effective ways to grow your business is to connect with the community that you serve. That can either be online or in person if you have a physical location in a town or a city. The reason why I say it's cost effective is because when you connect with your community, you become a part of that community. They get to know you as an individual and, more importantly, that's an easier way entry point to connect with your business then just watching an add many companies struggle with this because allowing their employees out into the location, or community, so to speak, to interact with businesses or interact with people, sometimes you can't measure it, sometimes you can't see it and you're not sure there's are a why. But I beg to differ because I have seen at work and that's why I brought today's guest on board to explain how he connect did and grew his business by connecting with his community. Dusty Sutherland was a general sales manager for a very successful automobile group in Ohio and he'll share how he made the car buying process much easier and faster because he connected with the community. And now what he's bringing to his new company, cognition, digital online marketing company. How are they now connecting with the community to grow that business as well? Really Exciting, a lot of fun. But he also talks a lot about the fear that a lot of people have embracing this strategy. So let's dive into today's episode of you're in charge conversations that spark change to talk about connecting your business to your community with dusty Sutherland. All I dusty, thanks again for being here. As I said in my intro, you know, you have been one of the people that over this last year or so when we've met, you really stood out and you know, we become friends and I really love your perspective on a few things that we're going to discuss today. So first thing I want to talk about how I met you and what stood out was this idea of being in an automobile dealership, being at a manager there, but connecting to the community. Usually auto dealerships, although they are probably the most generous in town, they are one of the higher employers, meaning biggest employers, in town, people still have a very leary perspective of auto dealerships. What you broke through that and really connected with the community. So let's talk about that. How you did it, some of the examples and ways that some of our audience could do that for any business. Yeah, absolutely. So building the community is super important. Number One, it doesn't cost a whole lot. Number two, it helps with a lot of your marketing. There's just so many benefits to it and it helps just with relationships throughout. It gets people talking about you, they do your marketing for you and you know and when that happens there's an overall good feeling about the dealership and partnerships that you have right with the community. So I would say the first the first thing is community is not just necessarily where you are geographically. I mean that's the first one, that's the most important one, but to anybody that's out there, a community can be who you make or who you love or who you bond with or issues that you find in Orton and you always want to seek to serve, serve first. So if you if you serve that community first, it will then in turn remember the service that you gave and serve you. So I'm from a small town in Kentucky, tobacco farming community, very rule, very out in the middle of nothing, and when growing up, my godfather owned a Ford store and literally every time you turned around he was involved. He was he was at you know he was, he was at...

...the tobacco market, he was at the state fair, using Kroger, he was a deacon in the church. I sit next to him in church. Just it just everywhere you went he was there and he was involved and he cared deeply, and I think that's where you've got to start. You've got to start with caring deeply for your community. That's number one, first and foremost. The second is trying to figure out ways to serve the community. So I believe empowering salespeople, and we can talk about this with leadership stuff later, but when you empower salespeople to identify with their community as not just the place they live, but also the place they love. It gives them the ability to get out there in the community and and to be more involved at restaurants and stores and other business partners, so so that they can feed off of each other. Clinton, one of the sales people that we had at the dealership. He had just a litany of business partners that he would serve and we would do facebook lives with them and get them involved in the car dealership. And we had one lady that came in that ran a beauty salon and she was close to closing on a deal and I think they had already closed on the deal and I got put together here, but she said, Hey, I'll I'll buy the car right now. If we can, we can wax your armpits. And I said well, and so I know, and so I was like yeah, sure, absolutely, let's do this. So so we did this facebook live. She went in and she had a little commercial, because Clinton's got a huge following. So she put together this huge following of of people on facebook live to watch her prowess of waxing and we got her involved in the dealership, which in turn got US involved in the community and another business in the community. So whenever that business overheard somebody saying, man, I really need a car or I need a place to service my car, they thought, oh, go to Wilmington of center. They helped me, I'm going to help them right. So it's if and that's that's a silly, funny way of doing it. But when we build these I call them, like being eyes, like many being eyes that selfmade were I have a certain level of service that I like to provide him my customers. If I go to a restaurant runt or I go to a barber or I go to another company out in town right and I give the same level of service that I would give. We instantly bond, we instantly have like this, this understanding that we're going to treat our customers great and then that's when you have the chance to go hey, would you like to be involved with my business? And and they work out in an agreement where, if you know like this, see you get a free dozen donuts if you buy a car for me. It's a cheap and expensive way to create a business friendly relationship around your community by helping these small businesses. And that's not even counting taking care of people that are in the community. So, you know, I'm not the Arbor of this. There are people that are so much better at this that than me, in this space, that at building community and being everything to everyone's so when somebody thinks, hey, you know there there's a family that needs diapers, well, what if that salesperson was the go to person for to get to help that family get diapers or put something together right? And that's what Clinton did. I mean it was beautiful. He put together fundraisers, raised like twenty eightzero dollars in one weekend for a family whose daughter had cancer, and it was just the most beautiful thing because the community came out of the woodwork to help this family. And I think what we tend to forget is that there are heroes all around us. They've just got to be exposed as being heroes. We've got to show them off as being heroes and we've got to make them part of the herb harrols being heroic in their community and making them a part of that. So so this you know Clinton, yeah, he was the Lynchman to put everything together, but he made the entire community of the hero, which just blew up even more and made them want to serve them even more so. So let me, let me, let me just unpack a few things there. So for those who are listening again just to you'll understand from the as I said in my intro, you know, dusty oversaw a car dealership. So Clinton is one of the salespeople in the dealership. So when you think of a salesperson, you think, well, they, they, it's a one way relationship. All you come to me, I sell you something, off you go and I don't see you again until you need to buy something from me again. So one of the things that you said, and I think this bears deeper conversation, is you empowered the sales people to be part of...

...this. Now, many times the owner, leader of a company, face of the company, will be that person who maybe doing similar things out there in the community and being that steward or connector so what you did was multiplied it out by having everyone do that. Why don't more people allow the salespeople to connect in that way? Do you think? Versus owner only, if at all, what we're why it? Why? If it works, why are we so hesitant to have our employees connect in that manner in the community? That's that's a pretty loaded question and I think it goes down to hiring and the culture from the top down. So when I was in the Navy, you you hire you way, you don't really hire anybody. You get what you get, and the folks that you got, there was really no you had to mold them into this vision of what they had to be, what the US Navy had always been and what had to be accomplished, what had to be done. Where we have this ability to take folks that just have a deep empathy and care about the place that they live and the people that they will take care of and and then just show them how to do it, like give them the ability to do it. So I think empowering a salesperson to say yes as often as possible is extremely important and also very scary. So you know, you you're not always saying yes. Sometimes you're saying in to back up to this. Some you're not always think yes. Sometimes you're saying, well, this is what I can do. But when you give the salesperson the ability to create this following and then go out into their community and whatever their community is, whether it's a place or whether it's a group of people, like, for me, I, you know, have a soft place in our heart, obviously, for for veterans that I want to take care of the veteran community. So we go out and me do things to serve the vetteran community. I did something for FFA. But when you do these things and you give the salespeople the autonomy to do it, they are going to be coming away with the mentality of what the dealer ships set of morals are, the their level of service. As long as there's an understanding between the salesperson and the dealerships ownership, it should be one of the same. It should mirror. Obviously the community may be underserved, but the level of service, the level of understanding, the level of culture should all be the same. It's number one. At I would say there is a level of laziness on some that are just like man, that's really hard to go out and build this this business empire with other other businesses. It's really hard to go out and put together these fundraisers. It's exceptionally hard to do that, but the dividends that it pays off are huge. Do you think? Do you think that people don't do that or ownership may not believe in that because one, I need my salespeople here so I can watch them, monitor them, make them work, because if they go out for the day to do all of these things, how do I know they're really doing and then number two, you don't. You may or may not see an immediate return on that time or investment, but in my mind I think it's going back to the way sales were twenty, thirty, forty years ago, where you were always outbuilding relationships and being at the Chamber of Commerce and playing Dolph and handing your card out to everybody. You weren't stuck in that location. Do So, do you think it's some of the reasons why it doesn't happen is that it's that trust or lack of control over employees like of I think it's I think it's a level of fear. So yeah, it is a level of fear, absolutely unequivocally that there's this mentality in all and it's not an old school dealer thing. Trust me, I came from an old school dealer. I grew up around an old school dealer in an old school dealer didn't care about how many phone calls you pay to day. They didn't care how many emails you said they didn't care. They cared about how many connections you made a day. How many how many real conversations, how many real connections? How many people did you touch? How many people did you help? What did you actually do? How did you get in front of people? How did you get a better message in front of people? Right? And so you know, Tim Cox said something DMSC last time. It just made me laugh out loud, and he said you got you got...

...fifty phone calls to making. They feel an average two are going to answer. which two? And everybody kind of looked at each other and he goes the to little answer right, and you're like, yeah, which two of those? Nobody knows. But when you're having when you're when you're actually actively in the community and present, you have to be present. And if you're president and community doing something of service for the community, then that when the community goes, Hey, I need a car, they're going to come to you. You know, two types of things that take away from that is front of Minder, back of the line, and and when you seek to serve the the market will serve you. I mean that's really at the community will help you when you serve it first. Always well, I think, and and I really why I wanted to talk to you about this because I truly believe in what you were doing and I always wonder why more people are not doing this. is where it's are your building. Well, you, you're I'm not see. I'm not sure if it's hard. I think it's. I think it's not ask of people to go do it. I think some people would love to be able to go out and connect or spend part of a day at an event or go help a community. Versus, no, I have to be in the physical location of whatever business, and this applies to any business. You know. I need everyone in the office so I can see them and count their actions, and then that becomes transactional, meaning the only time I'm calling you is what I want to sell something. The only time I see you is when you walk into my place of business and we're going to transact. So then business becomes purely transactional, but not memorable. It doesn't I don't know who you are as a person because I only see you one time. Versus, to your point, there was a fundraiser. Oh, here's dusty at Church. There's dusty, oh, someone needed this. There's dusty and now you you start to connect to dusty and Oh, by the way, he sells cars. I think that's a better way of you know, think about like your neighbors. I mean you know your neighbors and all of a sudden, if you know your neighbor is selling cars or that's what they do for a living, you're going when you have a question about a car, hey, dusty, can I ask you a question? That's what you're trying to do for the whole community, is it you? That's the way I see it. Yeah, you would. You would have solutely hope that's the case. And I mean nothing made me any more knowedge. So I was thinking about that when you said your neighbor, then coming home and see your neighbor across the street and a car that they bought from another dealership that's sold the same as you, because you just were you didn't go over there and talk to them enough. For you, you weren't over there, you know, serving cookies or helping out when they, you know, had a had a fundraiser going on with the kids and all that stuff. It's being being omnipresent in the community and being connected to the community is the most important thing, and I cannot believe that people with the first thing that everybody will think of the well, that sounds expensive. How much more expensive is is transactional sales versus relationship sales? I get guarantee. Relationship cells is hands foreign above head and above head and shoulders all the way pinnable. So much cheaper for a dealership to execute on that. It would be transactional sales only. I I tell customers this and I believe it. When I would go out and talk to him, which was all the time because I was you know, I would come, there was really no there was a tower, but we really didn't. I hated seeing up there. So there was customers out there. I'm out there telling dad jokes, making myself of animal answer questions just because I wanted to be present. I wanted to show the salespeople that there is no there is no disconnect, there is no all that. That that the wizard behind the curtain. You can't go see him. That's not who we are. That's why when you, when you and PCG helped out with with our are marketing on our website for going to the Chet Button, that was the impetus for that because we wanted to be the people that you could ask anything to and to ask anything at any time. That any time and day, whenever you need us, we're here for you and you can put that message out as much as you want, and until your community trusts that that's what you're really there to do, they're never going to believe it. All bimmercials do. I totally agree, and that goes back to that idea of you know, when I work with clients or I advise, you know, business is for individuals. I always tell them to work backwards. You know, how do you want your cousinomers to...

...feel when they're done doing business? That was the way my training was mostly through working in hospitality and restaurants. So you know, you had to say, well, when somebody leaves that restaurant, how do you want them to feel? So, because that they are going to be your best marketing. They're going to recommend what a great experience it was. But the key is you have to do it tomorrow. And yet they after because when they bring someone back, if you don't deliver that great experience the day my my recommendation, my friends look at me and go wow, you don't know what you're talking about, and so everybody loses versus this idea of building all these actions up. But to you and to your point, I really think it's not. It's not hard to do. It's the willingness to do it and the desire to do it, because it does also take time for to your point to really resonate. I can market that were available, but if I don't answer the phone, I'm not available, if I don't answer questions, I'm not available. I contradicts the marketing. So you really have to figure out ways to deliver on that and actually think it through and build it out. It's the whole joke of we have this red carpet buying experience. So if you market a red carpet it buying experience, what should you have on your showroom floor? Oh, you better have a red carpet. If you show up for this red carpet experience and you're looking for the red carpet, there's no red carpet, you're instantly a liar. Instant. Yeah. Well, well, you have to then justify or say, well, it's it's it's the experience. But people when you when you anchor it to something like that, when you say five stars. That's fine, you don't have five stars hanging from your ceiling. But, as you said, red carpet treatment and in your marketing ads you have a picture of a red carpet. You better have that red carpet or something like that. They're so when someone sees it and then they walk into your place of business and then that just connects it to say, Oh, I'm in the right place. Why? Because there's the red carpet. Now you still have to deliver on it, but as a visual connection, they may even laugh at it and go Aha, it's really funny. I didn't really think you're going to have a red carpet, but they're there and then you need to take over beyond that. But it's I really again for those listening being involved in the community, connecting to the community, to make sure that people know who you are. The this idea of breaking down the barriers. I don't care what business it is. It could be a restaurant, it could be an insurance agent, real estate broker, car dealership, whatever. That's a building, that's a that's a name, it's how do we connect to the people inside, because that's what we want to do, is go connect with someone who's going to help us understand what what I'm looking for. It could be insurance. I want somebody on the other side that's going to make me feel umfortable. Yeah, watch to be anything. It could be no, it's yeah, and it's that that seeking to understand part. That's that's Superman. Also the presence part. That super under that's that's really important. How much time and effort is spent in training salespeople on a meet and greet? So if you think about this, you you have a salesperson that sits at their desk for hours on end, going back and forth, trying to figure out how to perfect the perfect meat and greet. You know, I used to say something silly to customers like, Hey, is anybody who asking you folks, and they would say no, we'll mind if I do, and then they laugh and then we would banter back and forth and we would build in. Think about that. How much time and effort is spent on figuring that out? Now, what if I told you that the perfect meat and greet didn't happen at the dealership? What if you didn't have to spend all that time? What if, what if they already knew you. Ah, what if you already knew them, like when you're president in the community, there is no need for a meating greet. When you are helping the community. There is no need for a meat and greet. They already know you when people buy. So so I tell my salespeople there's three things that that encompass your product. There's you, the dealership in the car. So if if they bought you, well, that's the hardest part, right. Then the dealerships, a brick and mortar place that has services that are kind of Nice. And last is the car. Most customers, and I would say I aid most, ninety plus percent,...

...already know exact actually what they want. Why are they buying from you? Why are they buying from the dealership if they already know you, if they already trust you and they have an idea of what your process is. We'll see. That's what's let's what lowers see us. I scores Right unstand UN met expectations. If they buy you and they buy the dealership's process up front, you know when you know. And here's the thing. If you're present the community and they like you and they think, man, you're a great guy and you have really great how you treat people is really awesome. If that dealership hired you, they must also treat people awesome. And the dealership hires people that treats people awesome, and the F and I guys really nice to write and that other manager, he's a great guy, and then the the people in service, they're great people. And then next thing you know you're you have a community inside the dealership of friends that all they do is when they come in they're like hey, how's it going? How's the wife? And then how's this? How's that going on? And it can happen, I think, in any market. I think there is no scale that. I mean it's just off the charts. You can go anywhere with this. Well, Anywo the reasoning nice? Well, it's the reason why we associate level of service customer experience with certain brands, because they've decided this is what we're going to do. They built the processes or actions to deliver that and and they are relentless to hire the right people to fit that right so it's reversed. They're not hiring anyone and then pushing them through. They're saying, though, these are the skills and qualities we're looking for. Let's go hire those people. But to your point, I just interviewed a branding expert, Christine Gritman, and she said her whole philosophy with this idea of personal branding is why should anyone remember you? Why should anyone keep you in their brain with all the other things that they have to keep in their head? Why you? What's important about you? Where's that connection? As she said, the exact same thing. You're saying, that relationship that you start building with your audience, and what you're saying is be present, you're push and it's so smart. You're pushing your people out into the community to ultimately bring people into the community. But when they come to you, they're more receptive to you versus let me mark it to you. And then someone says, well, let me go try this, and so I love that. Much easier, you know, much easier it is to talk about that stuff when they know that there's a separation between business and relationship or business and friendship. So you know, you when somebody steps into your business and they're like I need your help, you go okay, no problem, and right now that you're going to help. They know that because that's your brain, because your brand is present, your brand is serving all of those things that your brand is, whether it's in no matter what, and this goes right back to it, when I talk about the difference between contortionous branding and life branding, be actually who you are. It's way more comfortable and way easier, and the people that are attracted to who you actually are are genuinely attracted to who you actually are and they'll always be there for you and they'll continue to serve you as well as you were. Right you, sir. So you know there's no need to be any different. There's no need to act a certain way or build this certain thing or come up with this this cool logo or this cool motto. When they see you, they think this it's a brand. It's already done. Right, my brand is dusty. There is no dusty cells cars, dusty does backflips. It's none of that. It's dusty. Dusty has a brand. Right, you want to have have have something like a go too as a Hashtag or something that that can be. Then putting a folder on your social media so people can easily find what it's like to do business with you or what your customers are saying about you, then that's Dandy, that's great, but just realize this. You already have a brain. Well, you're a friend that's in your family already see you as loving. Well, that's what people for years have said. It's your reputation. You know, we've just call it brand now, but your reputation always was. My father used to always say your reputation is more important than anything. You know your word and you know how people feel when you leave the room. What do they really say when you leave the room? You know what did they if they even talk about you. You know if you leave and nobody cares, or if you're come up and conversation, what are they saying? That your brand. And so I think that's that's really important...

...to connect. But I think in this for all of you listening, don't be so hesitant to allow your employees to be really part of the community and spend time involved in the community. Don't just measure actions or really restrict them in your business. To say the only one I can't trust you leave. You have to do this. I have to mic her manage you. That truly is not creating employee. You're basically creating you know robots who are not people because all they're doing is just following tasks and they're not present, they're not excited, they don't care, they look at it as a job. So they probably aren't telling their friends and family and neighbors what they do because they're not excited about it. So I love that. Being present, being part of the community. I think that really I think it really make sure your business stand out as a place that solves problems and takes care of the community and takes care of people. I think that's wonderful, wonderful, wonderful. Yeah, your highest, if you could, in all of your KP guys, if one of your Kpis could be the level of happiness on the showroom floor and the level of comfortable living in their own skin home. Oh Man, I mean I know revenue in the amount of cars and all that stuff is very, very, very important, but I had a manager tell me a long time ago because I you know, I was paid off gross and I said, Oh man, I just didn't make a whole lot of money on that car. He goes, pay more attention tew happy the customer is, the money will come. Pay More attention to how you make a customer feels the money will come. Relaxed, be yourself, listen to the customer and help them. Everything else will fall in place. So so that that's a great place for us to pivot to our next topic, which is okay, I know there's people sitting here listening going dusty. That sounds Pie in the sky, that sounds all great. I bet you your business wasn't this successful because you really got a grind. But even if they said, okay, I'm willing to do that, how do you or how did you work with your employees, or we'll call it train the employees, lead the the the employees to be more of themselves, to allow them to find this happiness within the the the day to day grind, let's call it, of any business which can it can be boring at times. How did you walk me through it? Because some people are going to say, okay, well, how do I actually do this? What would you say? Give them some tips and strategies on how to execute this? Sure, so, first thing I'm always going to say is going to start with me, right. So I had everybody that was in that building and understand explicitly that I had two jobs. That was to make their job easier and make them more money. So anything that I did, whether it was a process, whether it was paperwork, whether it was how we did one on ones, was to make their job easier and make them more money. So if if your customers, as a manager or leader, believe, if if those if those staff members believe, as your customers believe, that you're there to make them more money and make their job easier, man, it makes your life a heck of a lot easier, because all you do is spend all day, every day trying to find Kingston the system, things that's slow down the process, things that make it hard on the stales person to be present in the community, removing things from them that they don't really need to do. Stuff that should happen on the daytoday. That's very important. In things that happens on the daytoday that's not as important. And how do you prioritize that? Well, that's going to have to start with you and having a finger on the pulse of how people feel about what they have to do all the day to day basis. And I know that's very broad, but it's got to start there. No, but I think my I interviewed Dan Moore, who's the president of Vidadash and and we've been, you know, friends and partners for a long time, both in work, you know, to working together, and that was one of his leadership tips. He says his job is to remove obstacles from his team, you know, so that they can do their job. So, but to that point, if somebody is sitting here listening...

...to this as a leader or someone who's new to leadership and they're saying that's not the way it's always been done here. It's always been seen as I'm checking up on you to make sure you're doing things, versus what you're saying is, well, when I'm bringing something up, it's to make your job easier. Is that a is that in the presentation? Is that the set up when you hire them? Because for one person could say, Hey, I'm checking on or I'm inspecting this to remove something. Someone could take it as hey, your micro manage me, get out of my way. So how does that happen? Yeah, so this is going to go back to the navy thing. So, for for anybody that doesn't know, I was I was a combat medicales was called the navy corn and so I served most of my time with them the tree and in everything infantry. You you train how you fight, so you're trying to find out ways, pinch points, areas that's going to get you killed. That's really what you're looking for and and you're trying to minimize those as much as possible and minimize risk. Even though there's always going to be risk, you're trying to minimize as much as possible. So you you. It was funny because you started the you were talking about earlier, about starting at the end how you want to make somebody feel. I call it cutting the nets. Those of you that know who you know coach of Babano was his first practice of the year was cutting the nets and then starting backwards, going from there. Hey, we cut the nets, all right, now that we cut the nets, how do we get there? It's the same type of concept. We take a look at the customers says yes, now what? Now? What? What do we put in place? Like for us, we had just a whole bunch of paperwork and you had to go to all these different places and find it and it took made the deliveries take, you know, way longer than they should have. Okay, well, let's take a look at putting all that paper in one place. Then it took then it went to let's take a looking put in that paper as digital format as possible so it's only like one or two signatures to get everything done. So all the salesperson headed it was go out there with an IPAD, go through the paperwork and whatever could be digitally signed could be digitally signed. So you've got to start with these pinch points in these areas that slow anything down or make their job at all more difficult. So do you also on that, so so on that when you're doing this again, it's a subtle difference. But I want everyone in the audience to hear what dusty saying. Is it sounds like. Can correct me if I'm wrong. You're involving the people who are actually doing the job in the solution of the job. But so you're coming at it to say how could we make this better, or where are the pain points or where are you struggling? Without any judgment, but that way they're in the solution versus elbowing them out of the way. And I'm got my manager Cape on and I'm coming into say I did it by God that's the way you're going to do exactly. So it is that one of the other tips is getting some getting feedback. So we're going there as asking questions. You. Yeah, you absolutely have to, you know, to go back to that, to go back to the planning out an operation. Let's say you've got this guy called a gunner, and gunner is like a work officer. He's been around forever, it's prior listed. He knows he's doing. He's been there, he's done it more than you and more than you will ever do it. So you know, the operations officer comes up with this mission, says this is how we're going to do it, and he tells us, he tells the operations officer why is an idiot and why it's never going to work, why this is going to get everybody killed. I'm serious, this is this is entire job is just to tell the opposite of that. He's dumb and he's made something stupid. He's going to get everybody killed. I mean, I know that sounds crazy, but he takes a look. You got to start first with this thousand yard view of the entire operation. So if you're back a thousand yards and you're watching a unit move, you can see where the pinch points are in the problem areas are, but when you're up on it doing it, you're doing it, you're in it, you're always doing it and you don't know. Otherwise you don't know that there's a faster way. So if, if, as if you take a look at it from a customer standpoint, get your mom, go get your mom, bring your mom and and say, mom, I'm going to walk you through buying a car. Tell me where it sucks. You know, get have the salesperson do it, have you do it, have the manager go down there and working through the paperwork. The managers going to go man, why are we doing this like this? Right? We need to we need to do this now. There's always going to be what we call immovables. The immovables have to be operated around. Clean Up, gas up, those type of things. Yeah, so you operate around those things. Once you got all that operation together and you say these are the immovables, everything that happens in between there can be shortened and moved and made easier so that when the customer says yes, it's an in and outst situation and everything fires like it's supposed to. Here's the other point, though. Here's the other point. Nobody is better. I tell my kids this. There's nobody in the world better than you...

...and you're better than nobody else, which means you have to work just as hard as anybody else to do everything, which means that in the dealership there is no that's not my job right. I can't tell you how many times when we would be selling seven or eight cars at a time, cleanups backed up and I'm back there's the general sales manager washing a car, going to gas up a car. That that hole serving your community, goes right to serving your salespeople, serving your community. Your community has as a manager are those that work with you. But you have the title, so you have this title. Part of that title is figuring out ways to serve them better so that they can serve their customers better. And if it means you getting off your duff and going down the gas and up a car, no, probably gonna have to do that a few times. You shall never be above anything. Well, but that's that's what I think is great leadership is. You know, again I go back to the restaurants. You know, I worked under some very amazing restaurant tours and you know he I remember one time some of the people were doing that. That's not my job acting up, you know. And he just hold us into a meeting and he said I want you to be here. Everybody felt really good about that, he said, but I don't need you to be here. He said. I could fire all of you right now and I will be open for business tomorrow. Whether I have to do it or bring my friends in here to do it, we will be open and serve. Will it be as great as I'd love it to be? Probably not, but I don't need and he always would say he was not above picking up something, filling up something. He said, we work it it together. The title in this I always stuck with me. He goes, the title is a series of jobs. Right, there's duties. So in your case you're not the general sales manager, you are fulfilling the duties of the general sales manager and a well run organization, when dusty goes home and dusty takes a day off or dusty goes on vacation, doesn't need money. Someone steps into yeah, those those duties. So the machine continues to move forward. But to your point, it is everybody is there to do one thing, serve the customers and maybe make their experience great. So if you have to go wash a car, hey, got to wash a car. Hey. The only reason I'm washing a car is we're selling eight cars today and we're busy as all get out. You know, just like that owner would take food out if we were backed up and he'd say this is great. He looked at as a positive. If I'm doing this, it's because we're so busy. That's a good thing. And nothing, nothing made nothing made my me or the owner happier when somebody from the sales floor would come and go, Hey, can you grab lunch? You know we're busy. Can you Gret your heck, yeah, I can, sure, yea, I got you. Don't worry about let me go get lunch for everybody. You know. Yeah, but I mean that's that's part of having a servants mentality. I'll tell you this. You know, and again I draw back on the navy. I'll never forget the first time I saw this sign in the navy and it really struck me, like it really made sense. Everything I've gone through a boot camp, everything I've gone through with with infantry training, and everything is when I got to my first aircraft carrier and they have a damage control section, which is like shipboard firefighters. That's that's their main job is to fight and fix things and stuff like that. But they had a sign that hung up there that said ship, shipmate self, and I'll never forget that, because everybody's mentality is that if the ship's not sailing, we can't complete the mission. If your shipmate can't do his job, then he can't make the ship sale, which means we can't complete the mission. If you're not up to snuff, if you're not taking care of yourself, then you can't take care of your shipmate and help them do their job. Then the ship, the ship, can't do their movements and complete the mission. Ship shipmate self. Whether you looked at it from the top down or the bottom up, it didn't matter. Everybody's job was equally important. Everybody's job was equally could be done by everybody else. In the Navy you have a thing called warfare devices, and that's it's a time honor tradition that you go, no matter what your job is, and you stand to watch every watch in the ship, knowing everybody's job knowing everything that the ship can do. So if something happens, if there was a mask in figuration, then somebody could pick up that person's job and go to town and do it and there would be no loss. I'll never forget...

...when I got ready to leave the navy and and and I told my master chief I said, man, I don't know what these programs are going to do without me here, and he said, well, the name, he's been around for like two hundred years. It's going to be fine without you, and I was like, Oh yeah. So here's the here's the thing. If if you're running a sales department or a service department or a parts department or a restaurant, that doesn't necessarily need you there all the time, probably doing a pretty good job at lead. I agree, I think, with one of the tenants I learned earlier, early on, was your job as a leader is to train yourself out of a job for a leader, meaning, yeah, absolutely you have to have somebody on deck and the best organizations are always building their bench so to speed, you know, and the talent below them, whether it they stay in your organization or they move to others again, depending on what happens. I mean if you're still in that role, somebody who wants your role there may not be an opportunity to take that role. But the key is I should be able to leave, I should be able to be at home and the phone doesn't ring and everyone is saying hey, dusty, what do I do? In the beginning, okay, but eventually your crew, if they're doing that, you're creating a dependent workforce who can only function if you're there or they need your permission to do everything. That's exhausting. But to your point, is that idea of I love that self and shipmate and ship. So same thing. It the the dealership or your business is that's an entity and everybody all hands on deck to go help the customer. It doesn't matter. It's the customer that matters. Then we'll figure out. Was it a training issue? Was it just a glitch? Today we're super busy. What? Why? Why did we have to deal with that? But that happens after when we're looking at it to be able to say what happened so we don't repeat it. If it's a glitch, let's fix it. If it's a trainee issue, let's fix it. But to your point. It's not judgment, it's you know, we are a team, we are a unit and we all have different roles, but nobody's role is more important, because in the case of a dealership, if the porter is in sweeping because he doesn't think it's important, well the place is not going to look nice. You don't care what happens. But if I'm sitting there sweeping and you ask that person what your job is like, I'm making sure this is what we I'm representing cleaning this place up, because that's the level of custom I want my customers to be happy when they see that it's not you're sweeping floors, it's on the piece to the success of this organization. Yeah, and they should be on top of that too, because you can. Here's the weird thing. Brad, Brad Pascal and ED slaughter, we're talking on a video the other day, and this is a great topic, about farm team mentality, about there is no there is no farm team for automotive. It's like, you know, I'm a huge risk of a huge baseball fan, and enjoy vado is one of my favorite baseball players. He's a great first baseman. You think of him as irreplaceable. Well, I promised you. If you go to Bible Kentucky Right now at first base for the Louis will baths is his replacement. That guy standing down there. They're training him to go up if something happens to joey bottom, to take joey bottles jock when he retires. It's going to happen. So you know, it's the same thing in this business. is is everybody should be ready to step away or up at any time if, if they're doing that, they're comfortable in the process. And I'm going to write something down here because it's sticking in my head and I want to cover it. Is is fear of process or feel fear of failure in the process, which is a trust or a loss of trust in the process. So people, sales, people, managers, anything. When I stepped out on a patrol in Iraq or Afghanistan or wherever I was it, I never feared for myself. I can't say I lie. Yes, I was scared, obviously, but I never feared about what was going to happen to me that much. It was it's kind of complicated when we think about it that way. But and I also never thought about the process. I never thought about okay, I guy gets the sucking chess moman. This is how we do it. We have a contact right, this is how I do it. We trained...

...to fail, find the failures, get over the failures and then go. And then when we stepped outside the line, there was no process in mind. It was eyes, you know, eyes forward, ears open and click, it was like you're ready to rock. We the sales people, but that goes to sports as well. Is that you repeat over and over and over again so that your body knows what it needs to do and then you can just be present. We used to. I worked in, as I said, restaurants. I worked in other businesses where that's all you did, was you trained over and over and over again, because if I know my product so well, right, and that was one thing that you know, even in the restaurant, they drilled into you everything that went into a dish, so you didn't have to think about it. You could just listen to the customer. If the customer ask you a question, you were very confident in your answer because you add to your point is you trained, you were quiz. At any moment in time, this manager would walk around and go okay, dusty, what's in this sauce here? And you're you're doing a million things and he's going, what is it? And it was. It was just drilled into at any moment in time I could ask you something and you need to know that. So I think that idea of I like that. You're training to fail me neither. It's not a bad thing. We're finding and training you fail in training as often as possible. Well, tell you right now. Well that as often as possible. I don't think they do enough of that. That was where we, as I said, my whole way I train people. I've been training them the same way for all these years, a long time, because that restaurant I had waited tables and worked in restaurants for a dozen years before I got to this place, and when I got to that place they could have cared less. They're like, okay, so that means you understand restaurants, you understand what it is being busy. Let us show you how we do it here. And the people who fought that, well, let me tell you about that. They throw them out there like I don't have any time for this. Let me show you, and they just kept repeating it over and over again and they wouldn't let you get near the customers until you prove that you knew what they were doing, so that you'd you'd follow them around and they'd watch you and they kept asking you questions and if you failed too many times, they just looked at it and said, well, you don't take this seriously, you can't be on our team because you're not going to screw up the presentation because you want to do it your own way or you don't want to listen, or do you won't, don't want to put into top like I was scared of this person the first time. I came back like yes, yes, sir, yes ma'am, I got it and it was a phenomenal experience. I learned so much. But I don't think we, I don't think we train that way in a lot of businesses, but especially automotive because one it takes time. People think it's condescending, but again, I don't. I don't see people walking around go and tell me about this, tell me about this, tell me about this. It's about this. How much fear comes from process failure or fear of process failure or feel of fear of personal failure, and I would say I'll never forget this. One of the salespeople we had just hired. He probably been on a couple months and you know, we're going through all this stuff and we've all seen it. We've all seen it. Every manager that's ever set in a store has seen it. A car will drive on, it'll park, customers get up and they start walking toward the cars and the SALESPAR's and gets up and they stand and look like prairie dogs. Yep, why do they not? Why do they not engage? Why are they not talking to that customer? And I would suffice it to say that is it is lack of trust in the process and their training and it's fear of failure. UNEQUIVOCALLY, unequivocally. So, if there's a way to tell like I remember I saw that and I went up to my sales person and I said you're going to go talk to him, and he was like yeah, and I said, what are you afraid of? And he looked at me and I said no, tell me it's okay. What are you afraid of? Because I don't know what to say. I said, won't you start with hello? Just go there and say hi, you're a nice guy, you care about people, right. He said Yeah. I said, okay, just go out there and say hi. Go out there and say hi, introduce yourself and ingratiate him. I said, it's a matter of fact. Let you and me both go, and so we both go out there. You cannot wait to see the fear and then engage after the fear. Go out there with them in the fear. Like go, just go. You know, there used to be a thing, and this is another topic for maybe another day, but I cannot stand dealership. Link Go. I hate the cold corney talk, the first pencil, the up bogue, all of that. That's that is a that is a combat thing.

This is not. This is car sales, not combat. There is no difference between them and me. There is no them and me. There's US working together to help you solve a problem. So there should be no fear there. There should be no US versus them mentality that. If you get rid of all of that, then it's just me talking to another person and I'm trying to serve them as as best as I can, and doing that, removing that fear with that salesperson will help them see it's okay to be me. It's okay to be me. It's okay to listen, it's okay to not all I say. I think that fear, what you're saying, is and it goes back to what you said in the very, very beginning about in great you know, being part of a community. It starts from the top down. Yeah, they see this is an atmosphere where failure is criticized and punished or mocked. Now I'm stressed out that what if I fail? Now I have to go deal with that. Number too. Is, as you said, the fear of the process, the fear of I don't know. Well, why would that person even be there in that position and not feel comfortable? Now I still could know it and test well in the classroom, but now, all of a sudden it now we're going live and there's a real person there and I have to do that. Okay. And, like you said, that's the point. We got to be with them to help ease them over, to show them that see, you know what you're doing, and they go oh, yeah, I guess I do know what I'm doing, because they put the pressure. But but it is that environment of failure is acceptable. As I always tell my team. If you're going to fail, fail forward. will learn, but don't keep making the same mistake because, especially after you've done it and now you're you know, then it becomes you don't care, and that's a whole other conversation for a whole other day. But that it is breaking down that fear of are you creating a fearful environment? And are they prepared, as you said, prepared for battle, and not that sales is battle, but are they prepared to execute their job? And it's all things. If you notice this, we all go back to serving first. I have expectations of my team, but they have expectations of me. Sure. So what are those? What are those expectations? You know? So if if we never said an expectation or we never have those conversations, then you're going to have constant, constant fear of failure, you're going to have constant fear of rejection, you're going to have constant I'm always going to screw up, going to Piss the manager off, I'm going miss the customer, I want to do this. It's going to happen. Yeah, of course you're going to Piss me off, you're going to do something's going to make me mad, but I'll tell you what we're going to do. We're going to address it and we're going to work through it and it won't happen again. I remember my F and I trainer told me he goes it's okay to make a mistake one time and I laughed about that. But but it was funny because it was also the same thing that I learned in the navy. You make that mistake, then you debrief on that mistake, you find out, I mean you pick it apart, like you have to know why these mistakes happen. Like is it something that was in the environment? Whatever it is? It's all of that stuff. But there's nothing wrong with having a mistake, picking it apart, getting rid of that mistake and then moving on. It's going to keep happening. It has to keep happening. You have to keep making mistakes to get better. But see, to me, I frame it a little differently in terms of saying it's results, all right, so what what results did we want? And the question is, did we get them or did we not? If we achieve the results, it's the same, same debrief. Do we know what we did to do these results? So that we can do the same actions in generate those same results, right, instead of I don't know what happened, we just won, right, but you'd got to know that. But then, if I don't, same thing. It's the actions, not a motions actions. Let's fix those actions so that next time we achieve the result we want. If we don't and it happens again, okay, we're getting. Are we getting? Are we at least moving a little closer? Okay, they're that, and that's where you uncover their desire or lack of desire, to follow the process. It's not emotions, it's not a personal judgment. It's all actions. Actions Cause results. We don't get the results we want, well, we're either not doing the actions we're supposed to, meaning we're doing something else, or you don't believe in the action, so you're not trying right and so that way, instead of the word mistake, because then people get all weird on mistakes, versus you are doing something, you just may be doing the wrong thing. I have to understand. I to figure out how did you decide to do that instead of that, and then unlock it and move them forward. Sure, yeah, and it you know, for for lack of a better term, the navy, they teach us a flow chart. For me, even they don't, they don't...

...call it that, it's how my mind thinks. If this than that, it's worth and so you know, we float chart you. You literally flow float chart combat scenarios, and so you're sitting there with thinking, Oh man, those float charts are made for powerpoints and you know off of spaces. That's not necessarily the case. Like we flow charted everything and we do the same thing. I do the same thing in what I knew now, and I knew the same thing with when I was in the dealership, is I would sit there and go, okay, this is where we want to finish. Let's work our way backwards through it and train on each of those individual components to make them as easy and as seamless as possible, so the customer barely even noticed, is than anything's happening. All they know is you're serving them if you do that, if you do that, and I'm going to say this again, because the customer feels like you're serving them if you're training that way and empowering your salespeople to say yes as often as possible, or maybe not if they can't say yes, they could say this is what I can do, instead of saying yes explicitly, never saying no. You've enpowered the the salesperson now and they're're going to feel comfortable in their own skin. They feel like they have power over the process. They're going to have less fear over it and all they know is I have to do what's right by the customer. So then, guess what, you're now serving your community as your sales person. So, no matter what happens before, I have to ask somebody to do something, don't clean the bathroom, go do this. I need you to do that. I need you to do this process. They've got to see you do it first. You've got to serve them first. If you do, they will do and I think the other part is we sort of wind this down. I think one thing that popped in my head as you were saying that is that if you're empowering them and doing all of this, the other pieces, you're empowering them to raise their hand and say, I think I found a better way, or what if we could do this, or hey, there was a struggle, or what do you think about this, because they're seen as someone who's involved all you'd their opinion is valued and because of your sire, exactly. I always tell you know, get I go back to years ago. Someone said this to me. I was a regional manager and I would travel around to different of the the locations. It was inbound call center and I would go into there and if it was performing or not performing, I said, well, this was what you know, we came up with, and they would say, well, that sounds good in your ivory tower. This is what's happening out here on the front lines. And I always would say, okay, we'll tell me what's going on. Like conceptually this sounds like it'll work, but then let's go do it and then get feedback to say well, these three parts work, this one we got a tweet. I had no ego. Well, I cared about was where we winning. Right, it's not about my idea, it's getting that feedback, like you're saying, from the front lines. And so the more that your team feels comfortable as coming approaching the leader to say I'm not sure this is working, or I tried this or I I'm thinking we could do this, that is so important to creating an environment for a successful team, because then everybody's role is valued, which you've said multiple times. No one's role is more important. It's just you're doing differing duties that those people are doing. But ultimately our one goal is serving our customer. You're serving your team, they're serving the customers, but ultimately, by doing it, we're all serving our customers. Yeah, you know, it goes, goes back to that whole thing which you were saying earlier. I don't care about being right. To care about being successful, which always makes me lad, doesn't matter to me. Yeah, here less I hire smart people and get out of their way. Yeah, here's the here's the thing. If we can make in all things, the hero, you know, everybody, everybody that we serve, the hero of their story, it becomes beautiful. You know, faith. Faith breeds empowerment in and rest as always tied to that faith. So if you have faith in the people that are around you, if you have faith in the process, if you have faith in what you're doing, it's going to breed empowerment. Now, was he going to breed empowerment? It's going to breed rest, which is going to help you be better, a better version of yourself. Sure, you know, if you fear something, you've stopped believing in whatever that is, and it that has to be addressed. That has to be NIP, that has to be that has to be process has to be talked about, you know, right down from from starting goals to what a goal actually is. What's your North Star? You know, how do you how do you actually do...

...that? How do you do one of the ones? All of that has to come with. Okay, this is our process and we have to have faith in that process. If you have faith in that process and they have faith in the process, then there's a level of empowerment that can be unmatched, which means everybody gets to rest because you're empowered, you're comfortable and you have faith and what's getting ready to happen and you don't have to be so knotted up all the time, just you don't need to be afraid. No, I think that's a great way to sort of wind this part down, because if you I love that, if you have a process and you but I think to have that faith in the process is the faith that you can change the process and you faith that you have the ability to raise your hand. The key is whatever process is in front of us. We are going it's well thought out, we're going to execute it a hundred percent, but then we're if it doesn't work, we're going to tweak that and fix it so we can go go full more all the time. So you have to be Dave Wheeler, my desk manager at Bock and Suber and Little Kentucky. I'll never forget it. He goes. He would always tell me when I was young manager coming up. He would say you've got to be their strength, you've got to be their calm. He said, when you were a Corman and somebody was bleeding out, did you freak out in front of them? I said No. He said, well, why? I said because I knew what I was doing and had faith and what I was doing, that I was good enough to do it, and he said okay, and then he just turned around on back to reading his book and I'm like, Oh, crap, okay. So there has to be a little also, and there's also another piece to that is yeah, not that you had that you yes, that gave you comfort, but also, just think of that gave comfort to the person that you were working on, because if they saw you freaking out, they're going Oh my God, this is worse. Right. I always use the analogy of if you see the pilot and you're hitting turbulence and the pilot's just joking around sipping their coffee, you're going, okay, it's not that bad, but if they're pushing all the buttons and they're freaking out, you're going, this is what they do for a living and their friend out, it's really got to be bad. So I say love that point. So think about that. If you're if you're a customer, and you see your salesperson happy, be bopping around delivering numbers, happy, doing your paperwork, happy. Everything's happy. He's got faith, he's empowered, he's happy. Hi Kpi. You know, your highest KPI is happiness on the showroom floor and the salespeople. They're going to love it. The customers are going to love it, you're going to love it. Everybody's calm, everybody's happy, high in this guy. That's it. All right. Well, we got a wine to I could sit here and talk. See, this is why I love these things. Time just flies. This goes goes really quick quickly, so I appreciate that. So before or we wrap up and let everybody figure out how to contact you and connect with you. I do. I always ask a few questions focusing on one, meaning one thing. So one thing. First would be if I put got all of your friends, family, really close people who know you in a room and they had to describe you with one word, what would that one word be? Hmm Hmm, let's DEP Glenn tell you. I can tell you what I would hope. They would say. How serving. Serving. I like that. That one I would, I would think. So okay. Second One, what book or thing that you're listening to that's inspiring you that you would share and recommend to other people? Gosh, you know, I I've you know, I'll tell you. The last book that I read that that really inspired me to get my stuff together as far as setting up my days is Frank Frank Lopes book seven minutes set up. It's a quick read, it's great read and it helped me really kind of tie in my day together and get things get things together. And then I read a book called make your bed and my kids, written by the rear or admiral that spoke at the that was a navy seal that spoke. I University of Texas and I read that to my kids and, as crazy as it sounds, that book helped me get my date. It helps wrap my brain around getting my day started and putting things together by reiterating that to my children. Right, make you dead. Okay. So, yeah, I like both of those. All right, usually I ask one of there's two more questions, but I would be remiss because one of your talents are dad jokes. So you got to give me one joke. Give me one joke, give me a Guy...

Gosh. Okay, all right. So if you ever lock yourself out of the House, make sure you just take a knee right in front of the door, right in front the lock, Glenn, and you speak to it really calmly and quietly, because communications the key. Okay, well, that was interesting. That was a good one. I like that one. I'm going to use that on my kids. So they go, what's yeah, well, what's the difference between a hipone and Zippo? I don't know what. One's heavy and the others a little lighter. There you go, but I'm bunch. All right. So last last question. We talked about a lot of things here and I always ask my guests if you had to hope the audience got one thing out of this conversation, just one. What would that one thing be? Seek to serve. First, unequivvably serve your community, sir, whoever your community is, whoever is important to you, whoever's doing something for you, serving, serve them, listen to them, be there for them and serve them, be their strength. Love that love. That adds a phenomenal way to end. So why don't you tell everyone where they can connect with you online, you know, if they want to reach out, and most of you should reach out, because dusty is a great person. So where can they find you? Yeah, so, facebook, instagram. If you go just to type and dusty southern, you'll find me, decal the eight twenty two on instagram. Very active on there. A steer, a lot of stuff of my kids playing soccer and Bass, volunteer leading and all that, so you can follow along and watch them. A pretty proud dad. You can message me directly through their or you can email me at dusty at cognision digital done I own. That's the best. That's that's the best way to to message me. All right. Well, listen, I had such a great time. As I said, I you have been such a joy and a happy part of meeting you, part of my life now. I love contacting you, chatting with you and talking with you. I've been wanting to get you on here because I truly believe you know why we connect. It is we both have, I feel, have a servants mentality and a servants heard but you really do walk that talk. So I really do appreciate your time today. I think you've given a lot of great value here. So, audience, you know the drill. Please make sure you subscribe to the podcast on Apple Or, if you're an android user, on spotify. You can jump over to the Youtube Channel to watch our conversation and you can see dusty's phenomenal mutton chops. As he says, he's bringing mutton chops back, so he's a very handsome man there. Also, please, if you found value today, share this out. I'm sure there's a lot of people who could benefit from what dusty shared with us today and, as always, I appreciate your time. I know there's a lot of places that you can consume content, but the fact that you spend time with dusty and myself today means the world to me. Thank you so much and, as I say at the end of every episode, you're in charge, but dusty just gave you a few more tools to help you become more successful, both personally and professionally. I look forward to seeing you on the next episode. Dusty, thank you so much for being here. Appreciate at my friend Lynn, thank you so much, and hey, by the way, you're doing it a great job and everybody's proud of you. Well played. See y'all.

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