"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 121 · 8 months ago

The Key to Employee Retention with Andrew Street

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Employee Retention is even more important to businesses in the coming years. With labor shortages, and competition for employees grows, retaining your top talent should be the focus of every leader.  

Andrew Street, CEO and Founder of Dealer OMG shares how he uses connection and understanding to make his team feel part of the vision of the company. Through listening and planning, Andrew has built a thriving business and he shares his process in this episode.  

Tactical and very honest. Enjoy  

About Andrew: I work with dealerships to help account for every single dollar spent on digital advertising. The result; our baseline costs per vehicle sold and a gold mine of data illustrating what works well and what doesn't work for a dealership's advertising.  

Social Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/streetandrew/ 

Contact: andrew@dealeromg.com  

About Glenn Pasch: "Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”  

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.     

Let’s Connect: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/​ 

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/​ 

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

Support for this episode comes from PCG digital. It is anywhere from difficult to impossible to manage every aspect of the changing digital landscape. Rather than trying to do it yourself, why not leave it to an award winning team of Digital Marketing Specialists who have mastered at all connect to your message with more potential customers with PCG digital. Go to PCG digitalcom for more information. So what is it like to really run a business, to be in that leadership chair? It can be very similar to leading a team where you're worried about you know, your employees or your team members. But today I brought founder and CEO and Drew Street. He owns and runs an agency called dealer OMG, dealer online marketing group, and at first I was talking to him about how he built his culture and was scaling his business, but the conversation evolved into what we both want for our employees and our struggles or challenges as we've both grown our businesses, and he was really open and vulnerable about what he had hoped, some of the mistakes he's made, some of the successes he's made, things he's learned as a leader how to let go of things. It was a really intimate and wonderful conversation. Even at one point he said, Oh, I forgot the people are listening to this. So really this episode is you being a fly on the wall with two owners talking about the challenges of growing their businesses, the similarities, some of the struggles, how we shared and helped each other. So I hope you really enjoy this episode. I know I did. So let's dive into today's episode of you're in charge now what with Andrew Street and myself talking about leading our companies. All right, so first off, Andrew, thank you for joining me today and and one of the things I wanted to chat with you about it's as a fellow business owner and leader. You had your company for a while and it's grown and one of the things that I feel leaders of companies miss on is that idea of how do I grow my business and maintain that culture what I wanted it to be in that initial phase. But for you, how would you be? You know, either from your experience or recommended to someone else, how do you really grow your business and maintain that culture of what you started the company to be? I love this conversation and it's not the the answers not simple and it's certain something that everybody in a leadership roller it's trying to grow an organization or lead a team and hire and fire and drive culture, is probably a student of in in a lot of capacities and it's I mean the cool thing is that there's so many resources out there to pick up this information, whether it's just youtube or podcast like right tuning in and listening and having a platform where people can have these conversations, or like implementing with consultants, with traction or with entrepreneurs organization or different things, where there's just countless resources. But it sounds I think the questions like around how to keep the culture. It's easy to say, okay, here's the chart, here's who's who's who's boss, and but to create a culture that's your culture and it resonates with you, you know, starts with you know, the business owner, and then that's something that you can kind of communicate and it can can have a feel across the company. I imagine you can relate. It's tough to keep too, especially as like we used to have an office in Austin and everybody ID want to hire. It's either you got to move to Austin or you living on and that's my pool of people. And then with everybody not being able to go to the office. We had a freeze come through. We're in Austin. We had a free has come through Texas. All the pipes exploded. So we're perfect, we're remote and I don't see a future where we're going to get back into an office at the same a hundred percent of people in the same office capacity. So it's like, okay, now what can we do to and I I'm probably mistaken, but I like to think that our culture is better now than it was when we had an office. HMM okay. So so let's think about that. Let's let's break this down into two pieces. So when you had everyone there and you made everyone...

...come before the pipes blue and we all got pushed to remote as well, walk will give it. Give me a few tactical things that you did as you grew your business in that location. Right, so we had everybody there. What were some of the things that you said? We have to continue to do acts in order to feel like we were maintaining this culture as we grew, because even if you went from twenty employees to forty whatever can, even if it's in one building, it's getting further away from those two or three people that started everything. So how? What? Will Give me some tactical things that you did to keep it going? I don't think I did. Culture to me was having it feel like a fun place to work and when we interview have kind of fun, Quirky questions and have cool posters on the wall and hey, a ping pong table and we've got a stack in the refrigerator that nobody ever drinks, but it looks like a fun place. And we go and so many people, especially like born after one thousand nine hundred and eighty nine. When we're interviewing them, they're like what's the work culture? Like I'm like, God, you know, we you know, we used to have a foosball table, but we don't have room for it anymore. But now we go to happy hours. And it was not it wasn't very me and I didn't know what I was doing. I just thought having cool stuff right, paying for a great happy hour where we go to top golf. I don't like golf really, you know. But then, like I'm starting to realize it's so much of this the people. It's like just caring about the staff and now like and we had that while we were all together and it was kind of we didn't have leadership roles. It was kind of everybody did at operations in graphic design and all the stuff that an agency does. But since we've moved out, I've spent a lot of time focusing on that culture, on how to communicate that with our team, on relationships and now, like when I'm taking when we're having like our all hands meetings, I'm taking notes on the people of what they're up to in their lives and what's valuable to them and that their dad's is getting a pacemaker put in in January and you know, maybe they need to go to New Mexico and January to check on that. And let me remind me to follow up on that, not an insincere calendar and minder way, but just so I have a feel for how everybody's doing outside of their daytoday operations. So that's a long way to answer your question about but I think it's I think it. I think that spot on and I think we we all fell into the we want to try and be Google. You know where we'll get people because we have the ping pong table and we have will buy lunch and will. But the more I've gotten past that, because we had a ping pong table, I think everyone got a ping pong table. We were probably Google sent everyone a ping punk table. I think what I hope the audience doesn't miss is your pivot to what really I think culture is. Culture is driven by the frontline people and it's knowing what the people are. You can't force culture, but it is that collaboration. I think when people feel heard, field respected, feel involved. I think what you said when everybody didn't have a title and everybody was working together, that was the culture of collaboration versus the foosball and we tend to want to buy our way into culture versus really getting to the point up saying I know my people, I listen to my people, I respect my people. That, I think, is more important for companies moving forward than it is I'm buying a free lunch. Yeah, and it's it's figure out to like what Glenn, like what you value with your people, to and like what you see in that starts to resonate with like you the way you interview, the way you hire, the people you hire the people you keep on. Then are aligned with that and you've communicated that this is what you value. And like for us, it's like I want to see people who give a damn, people who really can't Yep and the simple as that. And then it's like the next step is like that, that person's growing. They didn't you know, maybe they graduated college, and now you know if this kind of flatlined and they're not doing anything, joining organizations, reading books, listening to PODCASTS, watching Youtube instructions for how to improve their graphic design or, you know, whatever it is, it's not...

...a great fit. And then, like, if somebody is sort of innovative to it's like Hey, what if we did this? HMM. I love it when somebody brings something new to the table. And then now, just like now, when we're interviewing people, we can kind of get a sense for do they want to have a voice, do they want to grow? And then, you know, with that you can sort of align your benefits packages and stuff like that with it to say, everybody's got a two thousand dollar continuing education bonus or stipend, and here's some resources for where you could go to maybe learn more whether it's a digital dealer type of conference for our industry with automotive, or it's, you know, a graphic design conference or digital marketing conference, or it's something that's applicable to our business but makes them better at their profession and kind of up skills them along the way and kind of push that on people. You need to take this and then same with like paid time off and profit sharing. Has Been Challenging to roll out, but it's been great. So every month now we're moving to where. Here's where we are. Here's where we're trying to get to. That's the next thing that we're at base camp every beginning of the month and then, if this will share the profits with everybody. If we don't, will do some partial share. If we hemmerge business, then we're all going to be kind of connected at the hip right. Well, what I like about that again is we're focusing on people, as people were, presenting our environment very clearly, and I think that's something really important for those listening, be it if you're in the the very top chair or even you're running a team. What are your expectations? What what is the daytoday? What do you what? What type of personality do you need and you want to bring and to your point you're saying I want people who are motivated to learn, self educate their active I look for that as well. That's one of our key components, is challenging them to be the ones who do the deep dive research and bring new ideas to us. Same for us. If you're going to go, if we're going to invest in you to go to a conference and learn, come back and present to the rest of the team and say here's what, something new that we learned or, more importantly, hey, we are doing this already and someone's out here saying this is the next big thing going on. So I think everyone, I think everyone wants to feel that that that they matter, and I think of course that gets harder and harder to do as you scale two hundreds or thousands. But if that message still resonates down to the person who's running a team, because again, if even if you have a thousand employees, they're all bucketed down into smaller teams, but if that message is coming down to each individual's leading team of those people matter. Know your people, know it's important to your people. I think that's where that idea of creating an environed arement that's attractive to people, to who want to come work for you. I think that that's much better, as they said, than just buying your way to happiness. Yeah, it's it's tricky to and it's taken a lot of you know, for one trial and air. HMM, you know, it could. I bet you can relate. Where when we first so we run a marketing firm and the first thing you know, the first hires we had were people that we could afford. They're fresh out of college. They're not too different than me when I got out of college that was willing just to do anything to get experience and if I had a little bit of money to pay rent, great, and we quickly established ourselves as kind of like the John Stewart for people's careers, where if you work for us for a while, you're going to get some great insights, you're going to learn a lot and then you're going to have a great stepping stone to a real career from us. Yeah, soon as you get beefed up, you're going to be ready and you're going to be worth a lot more money to somebody else then we're able to pay. So just took time to grow past that face to where you know, for one, we have growth opportunities, but then also just like an ability to compensate people their growth as they're growing, instead of us just growing them and then letting them, you know, of all their career to the next level, which is great, but it's tough to continue to start over at square one or once we got the ORG chart figured out, once you get clarity on how many...

...divisions you have in your company and who's possible for what, even if you are the top guy, if you're a smaller organization, you're going to fill four of those seats and some of those are below other people, and one of those is you're the head of some department and you're the head guy. So it's just kind of getting it's been just getting clear on what roles we need to fill, how many people we have to fill those and then, you know, once we hit a certain threshold, to fill that with a specific person instead of, you know, person that's that's doing multiple roles, no one. I think that's important for those of you listening again. You know, even running a team, if you're not really clear on what you need, you can either hire too many or you don't hire the right people or, to your point, it becomes a you know, they stay with you for a year, two and it's the equivalent of going and getting a degree and now I can go leave. And we had that very same thing early on. You know, our company's been around for almost fifteen years, but when I joined maybe twelve years ago, those first few years a lot of people who would tom get their skills and then go somewhere else because they could get more money than we can afford, and we became known as the place to go train and that was not great for us until we built our pipeline enough until we could afford to, as you said, reward them to stay versus saying, well, I can't match that offer, you have to go. But I think that's really important, but especially for everyone who's running a team, if you're trying to grow your team as well, be very clear with what your budget is, because the last thing you want to do is train a salesperson to do something really well and then they just go down the block and get more money and now you have to start all over again. So it is a it's very important to understand what what what ability you have to compensate your people beyond their initial, you know, entry level salary right and like, like what I'm working on now is just sort of like what is what does the summit look like? And like what are the bait base camps along the way and camps, and what is everybody's role in that journey? And can we articulate that? Can we bring everybody's you know, get people as invested as possible in this journey outside of just here's your experience, here's your compensation, you know, here's your role, here's who's here's what we expect of you, here's our monitoring it, but here's, you know, the North Star and here's how we're getting there. Instead of Hey, if we get new clients, that's great because the bosses get more money. If we lose clients, it's not great because the bosses lose money. It's we're all in this together and as we have setbacks, were all going to have setbacks. If when we get victories, we're all celebrating those victories, because it's more of a gustalt than then just owner of a company hiring people and making them push that, you know, push that ship out to see, but it's actually got a place it's trying to go to and everybody's got a roll on the boat and if you know, they don't feel like they do. Try to have a platform where people can have these conversations of you know, hey, I feel like I've stalled out or I'm burnt out, which is real, which is super real right now trying to, you know, work with humans psychological issue like problems and family problems and burn out of what we're asking people to do and being stuck at home. Yeah, that's that's one of the things could because we've been, I think now I can't remember when we all went home, but we made the official decision. Then we send everyone home and, you know, basically a been fully remote. Into your point earlier. I'm not sure we're going to get back to a position where we would ever have everyone in. One of the positive aspects of going remote was the change in thought process to say that people didn't have to be all in the office. It expanded our Labor Pool where we could hire people in another state remotely and you'd find more qualified or a higher level or higher quality of people who wanted to work for you. But wasn't they weren't going to move and being able to offer them that partnership. But it has been very tough. To your point of that blending and blurring of the lines of really sitting with our team in the in the beginning and ongoing to...

...tell people, make sure you're taking lunch, finish your day at five or whatever time you know, do your work, because we all could just work around the clock if we wanted to, and that blurring of the lines from both parts, from leaderships view on down, or to the employee. That's where that burnout because there's no delineation between that. It's very hard when you're I think it's very it's a learned skill for many of us because we're put in this position. But to really be able to work at home or work remotely, it's not as easy as everyone thinks it is. Yeah, and it's not. Hey, I can you know as a it's got to be more stressful for the boss because it's harder to measure what people are putting in and all that stuff. It's not. It's not easy as as an employee or an employeer working remote. You lose a few things, you gain a few things, but I can imagine as far as like you're talking about taking breaks and vacations, like, did you see issues where people stop taking vacations when everybody kind of came in and started just working from home? You know, that's a good question. I think looking back, there were always people in our company who just never took vacations or they would postpone. Are they carry over some time and you'd have to say please, go take time off. But some of them would say, you know, and in their own personal lives they'd say, well, I'm not married or I'm not in a relationship, so what am I going to do? Just sit at home? You know, I might as well work, and I had I understood that. But for most part people took their vacations. I think it's it's not so much to time off. I think our company we've been very earnest about saying when you're off, other people will cover for you. Take your time. It was more this hearing that well, I'm done with dinner, I'll go back and finish a few things, or on the weekend I'll finish a little things are I'll start. So it became this working more hours or never feeling like five o'clock. I could be done or six clock I'd be done. There's always this nagging thing because I could see my desk, where before I'd have to go to the office and all my all my stuff was there. So I think that was more of than taking time off. Is that? Like I notice the same thing where it's okay, everyone's going to work remote. Now everyone's going to be basically taking a break a lot and and but it took six or eight months to realize, like hey, nobody staken it was single. Nobody's taken a vacation. People cancel their vacations. It's also because people didn't know what was going on. Yeah, well, yeah, but for that to like kind of like okay, we identify this, like okay, we're going to move towards an unlimited pteo program with guard rails, like obviously you need to get permission, you to do it so far in advance and you know, at some point leadership has the right to fire people if this gets abused. But you need to take these vacations. And I listened to more podcast where you interview to lady who owned an agency out of Silicon Valley right works with I mean you're familiar with it. But like she works with just kind of like holistically the culture and the Organization for at a people level, and it was it was great, like it was a great conversation, because I'm still trying to figure this out for myself, where if it's just like I was listening to I was working a couple nights ago and it's just like take I forgot she call it like micro breaks or micro micro droves breaks like that's great, because it's easy to be like, okay, I've got a trip planned in two and a half months, I'm just going to just wither my soul away until I get to that, instead of like having a way to clear your head and take a break and step back from the computer, where, like I've always noticed, like it's hot, it's hard to take that break and go walk outside because it doesn't feel busy right. But staring at my laptop, looking at my internal chats and emails, add camp and reports and all this stuff like that feels busy. That's working right. When you kind of like lose sight of what what the the purpose of your work is and what the value you're bringing into your organization is.

It's not that you're cutting out from the organization by taking that walk. It's you're yeah, you're missing a big picture by just feeling busy, like you feel busy while you're looking at a laptop. Yeah, they and her name was Janet fouts and she and and I agree. It was a great episode. What? What? What? When you just mentioned that, what reminded me is more of my people, instead of taking vacations like a week, like you were saying. That's when I thought they could, but more people took three day weekends, you know, took Fridays off. You know, for our company every year in the summer's we it just became natural because in New Jersey, where our office is, the Jersey traffic around the beaches and things like that very crazy. So we used to always let everyone out by one o'clock, you know, so you worked a little bit extra during the week and you're out at one o'clock. But we found a lot of people taking those Fridays off anyway and these little micro vacations of just going away to get out. But to your point, it is taking that time. Now I've it's interesting being home. My two sons were home from school, you know, remote for a while. So every day around that time I was purposely got out to go have lunch with them and that became my break. Let Me Cook Lunch for you and sit down and talk to you. Then I'd go back. And to your point, we can, and I think that goes back to that idea of being busy. We can always find something, we can feel like we're doing something, but did you really accomplish anything? Now I went back to my desk and I sat there and I felt busy but I didn't really do anything. Versus taking that break, Coming Act with a clearer head and saying yes, okay, let's go. And I think that to your point, I think that's really important for all workers, everyone, whether you're in a business or not, you know, inside a physical location or not. It's respecting that time for your mental mental health to be able to walk away from work for a little bit. It's yeah, it's tricky and with you know, and then hat like you know, kind of with the the theme of the you know, the podcast, but leadership that you're running here. It's like and how can you, as the organization's leader or as somebody just like in leadership, have those conversations, encourage those breaks without feeling like you're losing control or your I don't know they're like. And what what that podcast sounded like to when you were interviewing hers, like she was super vote very vulnerable with emotions and burnout and all the stuff that she experienced ring an agency. And it's like, okay, is that an opportunity for us and leadership to have that vulnerability with our team and with your personal burnout and with you know, I don't have the answer for solving burn up, but here's what works for me. It's not writing and grinding out, grinding you guys working late and then, yeah, having a cocktail to row, you know, wash down the day and look out with an episode of be watching. Now we're watching succession. Oh yeah, that's something light and fun for you. Yeah, but to your point, what's interesting and I think that's important is when we first started going remote, I did a Webinar about how to work from home and I gave them some advice and said find a location and say that's even if it's you're you know, if you're living in an apartment and you're dining room table, put your stuff away at night, like pack it away so you don't see it. If you have a space that you can dedicate. That's that. And then try to stick to the schedule that you did in the office. If you came in at thirty and you left it thirty or came in at nine and left the five. Do that there and you took lunch at a certain Tun a lot of them in the beginning started doing some zoom lunches just so they could see, because a lot of them used to all eat together and then go walk around the building for a little bit outside to get a little exercise. But to your point, I had to be hyper aware, is the leader, to make sure I was respectful of that time, and I think that's something. To your point of modeling, you know, non burnout behavior is not sending emails at nine o'clock at night, even if you think, well, they will get it to tomorrow. Now your employees going my boss just sent me something at nine o'clock at night. They need something, or on the weekends. So again, if you're pushing out of one side of your mouth...

...to say I respect your time and you need this time off, then why am I calling you and said I mean outside of an emergency, I mean emergencies, an emergency or client really need something. But I think being respectful of that time is modeling that good behavior. And for yourself to say you don't need me at be you know, don't call me if father don't call me on the weekends. Unless the House is burning down, don't call me on the weekend. I think that's where that modeling, that behavior. But you have you have to commit to it or else everything just gets blurred and you know there's only so much gas in the tank before you burn out. Yeah, and like respecting people's Square footage of their homes. You know it's I like that you came up with that for your team and then, you know, as things look more permanent and it's it's kind of neat with having somebody who zoom calls that our customers see our faces more than they used to. Yes, in office we travel a little bit go visit clients, but it's not really structured like our our firms are really structured that way, where we're traveling a ton to customers. But now it's we can show them our faces and everybody on my team has their camera on every time we talk and we're not in our pajamas and overtime. Hey the background behind you, like hey, sometimes I've got, you know, a jacket laying on the couch. I'm going to clean that off. But not everybody has that luxury of, you know, having a an additional bedroom or that office or whatever it is it to have that space, if they're in the studio apartment where they can't walk away from their desk and then close the door MMM and be like okay, I think I'm done today. Instead, you're sitting at your desk and you just kind of turn this way and that's like the end of your day and you're no longer looking at this laptop, you look at that TV. So just noticing that me and like, you know, especially for people that live close to me, is like, you know, can we meet for coffee you want here and work for here from here for a bit? I've got some ideas I'm going to run by you and I don't know, just break something into a healthier pattern for people's lives while they're working at home. Yeah, so what we did was we've now downsized our office space, be just because we didn't need a lot, but over the last year and we're just moving into a new one. We just old people. We are going to. Office will be open, someone will be there three days a week. We tried everything, you know, scheduling teams to come in on certain days, and it just didn't work. So we just said we're going to someone will be there three days a week. If you would like to come in to take a break from to your point looking at your four walls, or if a few of the team members want to come in and collaborate, the office is open. And it was amazing how many people took advantage of it. Not every week, not every day, but so many people were very happy that they could come somewhere to get out of their house, even if they had a room. I mean I have a separate bedroom that I've converted into the office, but I look around sometimes and say I need to go into the office a couple times just to break that monotony. See other people laugh. Joke, because we still need that connection beside zoom. So I agree with you. It's encouraging that, especially if there are around your office, if it's still open and you can do that, just finding that flexibility. Whatever you're you know your structure is, but I think it's really important because it goes back to what you talked about initially in culture is having that as a leader, having that empathy, that ear, that heart to listen, to be aware and to be willing to say, I don't have all the answer. Sirs. Right, we'll try some things and if it works, great, if it doesn't, all right, that's okay. No, we tried something. I think that also is people want to work for someone who's at the top, who's very confident but also willing to say, not quite sure, we'll have to figure this out together. Yeah, it's kind of like the adage of like I well, I know what I would do, but what would you do? HMM, that's a good idea, like what else could you do, and the like. Get it more of a dialog than like, Hey, here's a big decision to make, with right seemingly big decision to make, you need to do it. It's like, okay, help me think it through, or like, you know, listen, let's be an power to be able to make that decision to and say, Hey, here's a issue, here's what I'm going to here's...

...what they're going to do. Are you cool of that kind of direction? Than Hey, let's escalate any issue that has that red flag on it right well, I think. I think there is a change in the way leaders are running organizations, or at least in my circle. They feel more the they know they have to make a decision sometime, meaning eventually you have to be the person who makes the judgment call. We can talk about it till we're blue in the face, but eventually someone has to say, okay, this is the direction we're going. But they're much more open to asking for input or delegating something out to a group of people to come up with some solutions and then bring it to the table and now we can all look at this. I think that's also as you grow as a leader. It's the only way you can grow your business is letting go of certain things because you can't run everything, or else you know you're never going to be able to grow in Your Business or you have your business grow if everything has to run for you, every decision has to run through you. You have to be involved in everything. Again, goes back to the bandwidth. There's only so much. So talk to me a little bit about that. As you grown your business, how has it been in your you know, personal like journey yourself letting go of things as that was that easy for you to let go of things and trust other people to handle it fully? What was that like? It's a good question. So, like my core competency, like my initial my we're like what getting out of college like? What my focus was was design, like graphic design, and business to a degree. Like I really focused on design until I realized it wasn't there wasn't a lot of climbing to do with that role and I wasn't that great. I wasn't that good at design either, and I was like working at a billboard, kempting, like seeing all the salespeople get the winds and the losses and getting beat up and kind of come you know, there's much more camaraderie and feeling there, where it's like, okay, we'll try to get into sales more. And I'm sorry, what was the question exactly? I so so. So the question was. I know you got the Glamor of sales. Now as you've evolved as a leader, you know, with your own company or another business, when you the more you scale up, the more you move up, the more you have to let go for other people to do and for some people that's comfortable. They're like okay, I trust you. Other people don't want to let go of it because they think, well, if I let go of this, I may not be needed anymore because someone else would do it. So for you, as you've scaled, I mean obviously running a company, you've had to let go of some things and let other people own them, run them and do them. It was that easy for you to do or was that a struggle? Okay, that's where I was going with a design part. The design part was only hard part is to really give people. You know, I've given a lot of like we've got good design good designers now. But yes, it's been surprisingly easy as we've been able to get people who have a lot of talent and that and like, for some reason, like in the last two years, it's really been like really having a chiseled in organ chart where we've got the you know, it's a role between the ideation and implementation. It's like the Clo and the CEO type of role. MMM, underneath that just having a marketing team for our internal marketing. We have a sales team, we have a customer success team, we have a development team that's developing product and then we have the admin and just having that really clear and then who's under each one and then having not. So my job for a long time was kind of jumping and each department where I thought I could fill in and reactively when people needed, you know, some more experience to jump in. Okay, I want to look at that with you. Look at that with you. Where now it's like, okay, there's a leader of that department and Right now my my department's marketing, our internal marketing. So if you have questions about our internal marketing, on the person. But if you have questions about, you know, product development that we're doing, there's a clear org chart for it and I'm not the best suited for that conversation. I'm how you know, I can make myself available. But so many more insane with our customer success team. If we're having an issue with a with an inventory feel, blahblout, you know, all the stuff. With these agencies, there's a team of people who are really in tune with that conversation, with that relationship, with that piece...

...of technology to be able to manage that with that team. And you know, initially I just kind of jump around and kind of be confused on try to learn it, you know, but doubt to be able to have that clarity on here's our departments, here is who's in charge of that department and here's the one I'm in charge of. That's really helped to get a lot of the ore, you know, methodical growth where we're not losing the wheels, aren't falling off and, as we you know, hopefully continue to grow. I know what seats we need to fill right you have currently that we can keep adding to, and I know what seats would be our next strategic hire, what that person needs to look like. Right's you're externally now when I think that's that again, really important for those of you listening is as you move up, it's really important to empower the teams and then get out of their way. It's not easy, trust me, I've done the same thing. I feel I think sometimes I'm helping and really on the on the bottleneck, because now I have people around me who've been working with us for between five and ten years. We have a large group of people who've been working long enough that they can look at me and say it's you and get out of the way, where you know newer people are not going to say that but it is important for all of us as leaders to understand that if we want to grow, we can't create dependencies. If we're creating everything has to go through US or every decision has to go through us. Those folks are dependent on us. There it's limited versus allowing them to fail and then fixing it. or to your point, and I it took me a long time to get to that point. I'd say it, but in action I just want to fix a problem till people would say, Glenn, that's my role, let me do it. You know, tell people to come to me, don't go around me or else again, you're creating the Mommy Daddy complex. If I don't get what I want from manager x, I'll just come over to Andrew, and Andrew will listen to me and and it. Maybe he'll give it. And I used to say, did you go talk to them first? Well, no, well, that's your report. Go Talk to them and see what happens. They're so you're right. It's delineating that, but then it's respecting it in the moment of work the Org Chart. Before you come on my desk, work the Org Chart. I think that's really important to build trust in your team that you have their back right and and you're not the resource for everything I got. I always say I hire people way smarter than me to handle that. I know what I'm good at. That's why I hired these folks to do that. Yeah, and you start to learn what you're actually good at. It's like when you get somebody on your team that's better at you than design. Find better at you than sales, better at management, better at, you know, abstract thinking about your pricing, which is you know, all these things, it's like you know, it's easy to try to come in and perfect it. Well, great leaders, I think, really I think people who are secure in their themselves. Like you said, I know what I'm good at. I think great leaders applaud the fact that, wow, I have somebody who's really great at sales, who I don't have to worry about that, versus feeling that that's a threat to you somehow, that you you should know everything or you should be the best and everything, instead of I know how to do this. You know my good friend Damn more from President of vistades. You say, as a leader his job is to remove obstacles from his team, get things out of their way so they can run and do see, instead of trying to do everybody's job. He's looking at all the things that I should be removing and, to your point, I can start thinking about what I'm good at so I can bring that strategy and that skill to the team versus worrying about what everybody else is doing. That's just not helpful. Yeah, it's too like as it sounds like as him, as the owner, it's like, are you more of an operational type of owner or more of a idiation person? Come up with ninety five bad ideas and one good idea and work in those bigger relationships and kind of the company culture and Strategic Direction. But where it sounds like he the Vista Dash, he's more maybe in the operations of the day to day of the business. It's good to have both, like we've got both with my I've got a business partner, Keith,...

...who's great with operations. He doesn't want to come to the table with a bunch of bad ideas but like to have, you know, organization where we can have, you know, two people or just have relinquishing a lot of responsibilities that you're not good at, even if not exactly the way you would want to do it because, like, because it's your baby, you know, and if you were doing the business development for your agency and you had a particular way of talking about the way you best work with your customers, and now somebody else is having that conversation about how you best service your customers and it's not the way you did it. It's saying here's traditionally what are our value has been for a custom it sounds like you're thinking of it more of a demo than a pitch. Here's I've always done this pitch, and it's not because it's closed more business, but it's because that's what I think our value is and it's always has been. It's so, you know, you're looking at a little bit different way, which isn't bad. Let's look at both scenarios and see like is a room for both. Should we start to move more in that direction? Right, right. But those are collaborations and that's the interesting thing. When you were saying with your business partner, that's the way my brother and I work. He's definitely the idea, million ideas, moving a million miles an now or and I'm more the builder operations team, but by being together. He's made me more able to trust my ideas and go and quicker and I've been able to maybe slow him down just a Smidge, you know, sort of the gas break type of thing where it he understands it, we just pause for a second. It may save us some time down, but not holding him back from ideas and I think to your point is really understanding what you're good at and allowing that to live without being threatened by anyone else's greatness or skill, in a sort of and looking at it how, together, like the avengers, how we sort of make such a phenomenal team if we all just do what we're really good at. I think that's where again, I think that's where people going back to earlier conversation, where it started, this idea of a culture, or if there's a culture where everybody is valued, in my skill is valued and if my skill is valuable, I have a place where I can grow and then eventually take responsibility and own it. I think that's where you attract great talent. Yeah, I completely agree, and it's like I listen to an interview with quest love. WHO's the drummer? We Yep, I don't know where this was but it was like it's so simple. He's like, you know, how did you guys become such a good band? How are you guys have such longevity? You guys been a band for thirty years, and he's just like keep showing it. He's like, every Tuesday and Thursday at thirty am, we meet for practice and if you're not there, will notice, if you're late, will notice, and it's such it seems super obvious for running a business, but it's like just keep showing up. Everybody needs to show up. Continue to show up, you know, not just physically and with your camera, but like be don't be hungover, don't be, you know, completely checked out. If you've got, you know, stuff going on, find a way to to take time off to deal with that instead of being completely checked out while you're trying to be present. Let's see that word that you just said. It was one of my words for this coming year. You know, in my year review, one of the words for next year is presence, being present, and that means, to your point, ready to work, available wholeheartedly in the moment. I always say be present where your feed are. So if I'm in this conversation with you, nothing else matters. I blocked out time. This hour is for us and I think if people focus on that and to your point with quest love saying hey, thirty, be here, be present, be ready. We know what we're coming here to do, so be ready to do it and leave everything else outside. You know, whatever their time frame is for practice. If it's two hours, you're that stuff will be there when you leave. But be here, and I think that, to your point, is when we're ready to work, let's work. When we're ready to have a meeting, be prepared for this meeting, when we're ready to go talk to...

...a client, we're on our game. Where at that? That's the time to play the game right. We're playing. It's game time. I think that's really important. But setting that expectation for your team as I think that's why successful companies continue to evolve and grow and retain is I think they do keep it simple. This is who we are, this is how we do it. If you're willing to do that, great, if you're not, you may not be able to be on our team, and that's okay too. You can go be on someone else's team, but our team we need you here, present and ready, not hungover, like you said, not looking all where's my stuff ready? And I think that's super important for for businesses, in for leaders because if you set those expectations and you deliver on them and you hold them accountable and you don't waiver, you start building a great foundation to build on. Yeah, yeah, and then it yeah, it opens up the opportunity to for people to find where they shine with in a station, within a you know, in this case, within a business. But it's like, you know, we've had people that have kind of pivoted out of rolls as a you know, instead of being a Unicorn who's good at everything. It's like you're really good at talking people off of ledges. When somebody tells you this sucks, you suck. You are okay with being like, Oh my God, I'm so glad we're having this conversation. By the time we get off this call right that this resolved and by the end of the day, I want to have some of these things fixed, you know, and to be able to have like, you know, it's like like leadership. It's like in elementary school when you play football and the like in and recess. I guess I think you d come in and do you like wait for I'm going to give you direction on what you're going to do, like there is there a pregnant pause, and if nobody jumps in, you say, okay, I'm going to do a button hook. It's going to look like this. Right, we're going to hit me when I come back. He's going to go straight out and if he's not cut, you know. You know, are you going to be the quarterback or the receiver, or could you be either? And like so it's kind of an opportunity for people to be either. And if you know, if all of a sudden they jump into the huddle in this analogy that I'm not sure if it's working well, but it's like that, that person can you know. Okay, cool. It sounds like you've got some ability to run a small team and to have some direction and come up with ideas with them and facilitate what a each person is doing. Are you interested in doing that with your career? Yeah, it's fun. I mean this whole thing is it's a crazy game that we're learning now, and I think I I agree with you. I mean this, this conversation has gone in so many directions and I hope you all are listening, because what I want people to get a take away from this is we're two owners of businesses and we're all still figuring it out and learning and testing and trying. But what I hope you heard is our goal for our teams is growth and retention and respect and, you know, understanding them as human beings and what they're doing externally so that we can all succeed together as a team, and I think that's really, really truly important. So so as we wrap up. So First, Andrew, this was this was great. I love this conversation. This was this was a really good one. God, I totally forgot people were listening. Now that that's even better. That's even better. So at the end of every episode I ask three or four random questions. I call them the one so you answer with the one thing that comes to mind and then we'll wrap up. So first thing, what are you reading, listening to or watching that's inspiring you that you would share with the audience? I'm listening to the long way around, I think, right now. Is audiobook on Captain James Cook. I've been traveling a bit and I've seen all these different things that are named after cook. He's got like the Cook Straight in New Zealand and Hawhy and an Alaska. I don't know. It's like that's like the he's that's inspiring just to hear it here. Yeah, I'm not going to give the long answer. Yeah, no, that's perfect lesson and then we'll hook it all up in the show notes to let's see what will saying that you traveled. Where's one place that you would like to go that you haven't been to, assuming all the restrictions are lifted and you can go wherever you want? I want to go to Iceland and I want my wife to want to go Iceland...

...and we'll go together. That sounds did she got to push? She doesn't planting yet. It's a beach it she likes to be. She's okay. What's one piece of advice that you got in your journey that stuck with you? That thought was that you said that that was really good advice. If you are that busy, you're not charging enough. Hmm, is what somebody told me a long time ago. And there's a consultant. We paid a lot of money to you, but it's like this is before we were in focused on our vertical. That we're serving, but it's just like, okay, you're right. Is like you need to have prospects that say no because you're too expensive. It was good advice. Oh, I like that one. That's a good one. Okay, if I brought all of your friends, your wife, close friends, family, people you work with and I said describe you in one word, what's the one word they would use? God, hopefully affable. Okay, that one I haven't gotten yet. That's a good one. I like that one. I've gotten a lot of them. That one I did get. Okay, last question before we wrap up. We talked about a lot of things. So if you hoped that the audience took one thing away from our conversation, just one, one thing that you said, my hope you got this, what would it be? I don't know. If if you are like if you're going to get entrepreneurial and want to start your own thing and run your own business, and it's just get started and continually look for resources. HMM, this podcast or there's just it's been a you know, it's a long journey and there's countless resources that are paid and free to help great love it. Yeah, yeah, continually listen it's not easy and you're right. There's a lot of resources out there. There's you know, I think I can't remember what I was watching, where someone said listen, there's nothing new. Whatever you think you're doing, someone else has done it or a version of it, so go find what they did. There's enough books. There's videos now and podcasts and conversations that you can go find ways to help you learn how to do whatever it is you're trying to accomplish. So love that. So Great. So let's tell everyone, please. How did they contact you? Connect with you? This is someone that folks you should connect with. So where do they find you on social or how do they connect with you? And we'll link everything up in the show notes as well. Sure you could. I can be reached on email. It's Andrew at dealer Om gcom stands for Dealer Online Marketing Group. or You could connect me on Linkedin, just Andrew Street and the company's called Dealer Omg. And Right. Yeah, Glynn, dude, this is great. I love this platform, I love the topics, I love that you're doing this. I appreciate that. That's really, really, really means a lot of yeah, these are a lot of fun and and so, for the audience, you know the drill at the end of every episode. Please make sure you subscribe on Apple Or, if you are an android user, over on spotify, you can jump over to the Youtube Channel to watch Andrew and myself have this conversation. Please make sure you share it out. I'm sure there's a lot of people you know that could benefit from what Andrew just was chatting about. I know there's a lot of places for you to consume content. The fact that you spend time with Andrew and me means the world and, as I say at the end of every episode, you're in charge. But if you ever feel like now, what now? What do I do? Well, we're here weekly to bring you tips and strategies and hopefully, if you laughs, to help you build the skills to be better professionally and personally. Thank you so much. See you next episode, Andrew. I look forward to seeing you in person this year as we cross paths. Go to see you my friend. All right, take care,.

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