"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 119 · 11 months ago

How to Personalize Your Video Marketing with Steve Roessler

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Standing out in today's crowded marketing space takes a unique approach. While video is something that is becoming more common, personalizing your videos is key to connecting to your audience.  

What are the best strategies? Steve Roessler, Chief Evangelist Officer for Dive Centric, shares how he helps his clients convert more sales opportunities using video marketing. Fun fast paced and full of tactical advice.

 Get ready for this coming year!! Don't forget to subscribe, share and rate the show!!! Enjoy  

About Steve Roessler Steve Roessler serves as Chief Evangelist Officer of DriveCentric, a leading provider of dealership software solutions. With over 25 years of expertise servicing customers, Steve’s passion is helping dealers embrace new technology and long-term strategies that drive sales and market share growth while providing an exceptional customer experience.  

Steve is recognized as one of the most prominent voices in automotive advocating for dealerships, customers, and the community. With his infectious personality, audiences enjoy a learning environment that’s fun, inclusive and informative.  

Steve lives in St. Louis, MO, with his wife and daughter and is a die-hard Cardinals and Blues music fan.  

Connect with Steve: https://www.linkedin.com/in/steve-roessler-85b8397/

About Glenn Pasch:

"Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.

Let’s Connect:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

Support for this episode comes from PCG digital. It is anywhere from difficult to impossible to manage every aspect of the changing digital landscape. Rather than trying to do it yourself, why not leave it to an award winning team of Digital Marketing Specialists who have mastered at all connect to your message with more potential customers with PCG digital. Go to PCG digitalcom for more information. What if you're in charge of implementing a new process or a strategy or even a piece of technology into Your Business? You're the one who's going to lead the charge. Well, how are you going to overcome some of the obstacles or the pushback from your team leadership? May think it's great idea, but what if your team is hesitant doesn't understand why we're making this change? It's not always easy. So let me throw another thing on top of not just maybe a strategy change, but what if this is a philosophical change and evolution of the sales process? For years we've used phones, we've used emails. Were now texting at a much higher rate, but video, video conversations is still an untapped strategy. So if you're being tesked with getting your team to make more videos, have more ongoing videos. Maybe you're creating some videos to explain your product or service. How do you do that? Make them effective? Well, today I brought in a video expert. Steve Wrestler, is the chief evangelist offer, sir, of drive centric. It's an automotive crm company, but it differentiates its technology through the use of video. He is an advocate for video. He's built his career, his company on the use of video. Everyone knows who he is. Why? Because of his videos. So he's going to talk about that today. How you can leverage video correctly to make sure that your customers understand who you are, get a sense of your integrity, your character and, more importantly, want to do business with you. So let's dive into today's episode of You'R in charge conversations that spark change with Steve Wrestler. All right, so, Steve, thanks so much for being here today. One of the reasons why I wanted to talk to you. You, you and your company do a lot of really changing structures and changing philosophies of how sales organizations, is case automotive, handle their sales opportunities. So the not so much the product. We can talk about that in a moment, but more the fact of here you come in and you say we're switching, we're switching technology, we're switching thought process, we're giving you more tools to be able to maximize your performance. What I wanted to pick your brain about today is what obstacles do you face when you're the one coming in trying to change what are you hearing and then giving some tactical tips to the people who are listening to say, yeah, I'm in that situation, I have to change x, Y and Z. How do I get past those obstacles? So what would you say to that? Yeah, you know, you look anytime we're talking about just crm and changing, and we all know in the industry like change, crm, a DMS. You know obviously those are big changes to an any organization and dealership that they got to make a careful decision. We're going out there and pitching. What we're doing is it's it is a culture change. Let's face it. We are going out there and we are teaching dealerships that want to be progressive. is where I would like to look at it, not saying I go all these dealerships that don't come on driver not progressive. It's just a matter of what tools do they feel like they are it's going to take them into the next two thousand and twenty two. And you know, with us, we're going out there with this modern technology that our engineers, developers, everybody that built drive centric. We just have a very forward thinking team in the software so, you know, diverse or techy. I guess I'm at developer obviously just by saying that. But we go out there and find the tools. We talked to our dealers at our modern say what do you guys want to do, and then we take those messages and we're trying to end help these other dealerships try to understand how they could better talk to customers. I think the transformation we're going out there doing a great job with is kind of thinking of crm much differently. I mean we almost don't like to say the CRM, but that's the foundation of what it is because, you know, Glenn, every every crm is known as a data management tool. Right. Well, we're talking about with digital retailing. You know, in drive centric that is is digital retailing...

...is actually done within your sharing with all the engagement manager tools. You invest in it can't just be numbers on the website, digit retailing. The way we're defind is the customer wants to do a part of the process remotely. So when we're going out there talking to dealerships, we have to acknowledge the fact that these customers, they don't want to come into dealership, the up buses and coming in. How are you going to get these customers to come in your store, Mr Dealer? And it's all gonna Focus around engagement and that's what we're going out there and we're making it as a priority, is, let's engage these customers. Let's you know, the customers are buying car down faster than ever. Accorded to our data, it's like seventy percent of the customers that are buying right now are buying the first four days. Do we really need templates in four days? Get me out of the template mode, will ya? That's the easy button and we're following up. Ninety days. Great, but we're trying also refocus dealers on the meat potatoes were customers are buying and converting. And that's so when we get a the business leaders thinking in terms of that and saying, you know, hey, is is the crm I'm currently on going to take me to the next three years. You got to make that decision and and it's a long decision. Let's be real. I mean it's a you know, it's everybody's got to get bought in, and that's what we do a really good job. Is, is not just the leadership to make a decision, but obviously BDC desk managers are the sales people going to use it, and I think that's what we do a great job on and converting them right. All right, so let's there's a lot in there that I want to really maybe tactically break down a little bit. So I agree. You know, for all of you who are not in automotive, in your in another business, you all know that every business has some lead management system. So it's your customer relationship management tool, crm, or your database, however you're doing it. To your point, Steve, there are two camps. There's the preprogrammed. We just send out our messages to check the box, and then the other one is driven to basically be talking about how many conversations you know, how many people are you really talking to? And you can't do that from that. Just press a button and hope they raise their hand. So so for that again, someone sitting in that leadership chair, they have to go and talk to their team and say we are changing how we have done business for ex period of time, five years, ten years, whatever it is. What are some of the pushbacks that you've been in these meetings or you've had people push back in question? Why are we changing? What are some of the the objections you've heard to this change and what's your response? Yeah, the well, the biggest objection we get is obviously just my guys aren't using the tool today, so they won't use it, even if it's your tool, Steve Right. That's the number one. I mean, you know, or it. Maybe there may be some things that are the data loss, right. I'm worried about data. I mean. So those are probably the two biggest things that we get and I would probably say is they're worried more about the data loss. So the objection, you know, to overcome that is like if you're going to make a crm change and it doesn't matter. I mean we do the best we can with getting the data to import that and put everything in so it stays the same and if anything, we're committed to fix it right, and that's the thing, so that it we scrub the data with the DM as with the crm stuff, but you know all the notes, if we get all the information from the previous R improvideer, that comes in when it comes to somebody's got to be responsible to write. Somebody's going to be responsible for the change. So that's going to be a heavy lift for somebody. You know, if you got like ten stores, somebody's going to be launching down stores for a while, right and getting them all bought in. So so those are the two big objections that I would think a lot of people you know, when they are making a big decision like crm. But as a company we go out there, we offer training, you know, we do a lot of things to get the sales people bought in. You know, we do video training. You know what, if you're going to start doing personalized video, what are other people doing in the industry on video? And that's typically what happens. But if the sales people look at the APP and say yeah, I would use this APP, that they're bought in. They're committed, and I mean that's the one thing we get. That objection all the time, but just on the mobile APP. We had a ninety one percent usage rate on our mobile APP and we're proud of it. And actually, if the in with the head trash of deer saying, well, my guys don't use the mobile APP today, well that's because it was built twenty years ago. So nobody has a flip phone anymore. They have a smart you know. So those are the analogies we go out there and kind of leverage, because if you get a modern tool, people use modern technology. It's just the way it is. So those are two biggest ones we get. Yeah, and and and what I liked about what you just...

...said. One of the things that I want to make sure the audience crabs onto is there has to be a champion in the store. Right. I know you said ten, but let's just focus on one, because in that day to day we have to present the why to to the people who are going to switch this technology. It can't just be Oh, and nonor went somewhere, met you like what you know, your product said and then all of a sudden we come in and we have a new toy and we just drop it on our desk and say I'll see you versus really mapping this out and really breaking down what still stays the same, what's changing. Like you said, how is how do we use this technology? But, more importantly, how is it going to make my job as a user easier? And I think that sometimes is where there's a breakdown. We just either start off with some really great initial training and then everybody's left to figure it out or they don't really work all the way through. I think that's to your point earlier, why people don't use something they don't see the benefit of it. And so by making it newer or, you said, user friendly, why wouldn't you want to use something that you seem used to using every single day by, you know, dry punching an APP on your phone? YEA, and one of the things I'll point out that you depend upon you know who's converting, and I would say this for anybody in sales because you know, I've been in other industries. You know, but I'll give you an analogy when I say this, but one of the things we do, at least with our company today, is we always offer you know, hey, do you want to go visit a dealership and see it in action? You know, so if I'm in automotive, then I have a centralized BBC. I kind of want to see how suchize BBC operates. If I have a single point at attack, you know that everybody's doing start to finish, even F and I at single point. Let's have you go visitor stores doing that or, if you're doing credle a grave. But that was the same practice I did in the medical industry. If I had a doctor that you know was going to be leveraging when I worked at metronic and they want to see how the procedure would work, I would send them to a whole nother state right and they would go in and watch another doctor implant the device that I was promoting to see their technique, how they handle that, and that's something you could really help in the sales process to help overcome the adjective objection or the fear of change. Go show a power you are, take them to a power user of whatever it is that you're going out there are selling it for us, obviously, being crm, see it in action and make the decision. But you also want as a salesperson, we have to mirror their business, the way they do business, so they can envision it at their store and that helps overcome that objection converting to no. I'd see. I like I like that idea of showing. I'm a big fan of when you're training, you show. So in this case bringing someone to another organization, other dealership that's using the technology, they can ask the questions of how did you install? Where were your struggles? Where did you get compliance from your team? When did they all buy in? How long? Because sometimes when we're implementing things, especially change in any form, we think it's going to happen faster than it is right and then we get frustrated. It does take time. There's probably I'll call it maybe chapters of learning, of initial learning, then using it, taking a step back. What did we tweak and and and the other aspect I liked about that showing is someone that goes back to that, that advocate, owner, quote quote, quote unquote, owner of the project in the dealership, is responsible to be able to go in and show them how to use it and coach them how to use it, versus letting them try to figure it out on their own. A hundred percent. The one thing I'll just tell I, like I always sorry in any sales job is. I don't want anybody. If you're coming on word and I'm selling it, whatever is I'm selling this case, crm, I did not want you to reinvent the wheel. The best part about what I sell is it is something that's so drastically different that dealerships are going to alter their overall operations, and it for the better for the modern customer, for the modern dealership. So it's a dramatic change and to go through that type of change. We are always like, Hey, do you want to go visit a dealership? We're better yet even you know, no matter what you sell, maybe they come to your corporate location. One of the things that I'll tell you that we did, at least the medical side, because I was are the medicals for sixteen years, there was a term called vender validation and there's nothing, at least in really automotive, that talked about inner validation. But you know, when a hospital or a doctor usually they would go visit a facility to make sure that, hey, that product, that service, whatever...

...it was that I was selling was good enough to be put in my hospital, that I did my due diligence, I checked out that it was. You know, I so whatever up, the ninezero compliant, whatever it was. You know what I mean. So those are things that help steer a decision in your favor, no doubt. Well, what I like about that too is your it seems like you're so confident in your product. You're showing someone it, using it, versus trying to close them down right then and there. I think that's also a great sales tip for anyone who's selling is allowing someone to embrace the process. We do the same for our agency. Will connect them with people that are that use us, not just the one or two that are you're you know, your show client, so to speak. said here's a list, call any of them. Well, but I like the fact of encouraging someone to see it in u since because that, I think, is something that we don't do enough of, is analyzing when we're making a change, what really is changing. I think there are times where everyone is so fearful of change because they think everything's going to change. And in your case, the process may not be changing, it's the technologies that's changing. You're still following whatever your process is to you know, your sales process, engagement process. We have a new technology now. We may adapt and replace a step or, in your case, you have all of the technology housed in one location, so it's not a have to go over here, run for a video APP on my phone for here and I have to text off of something else. But that doesn't change the process of we're sending videos, we're texting, we're emailing, we're making phone calls, were documenting our conversations. The technologies different, versus that whole idea of well, everything's changing and the way I do things it's not going to work well. The other thing, too, that the customers committing to if they go visit is number one. They're they're probably thinking about the change methodically. So if they schedule and on site visit, that gives them a time to prepare, think about the questions that are going to be asked. But it's going to be very important for anybody in sales that you actually pick the right you know, place to visit. You know I mean that they are a big proponent, a huge fan. The way we go out there and do it is you know, I'm I mean I could go out there and give a dealership a name of somebody's been on like our company drive centracked for three years. We're trying to find people in Mirror, people up that maybe it on for like three or six months, kind of like in that window so they still remember the launch, you know, I mean because it's fresh and and it's modern and they could talk about hate. This is what I changed and and we built all these new reportings and these are new pay plans and whatever it may be. That I think it's fun. It's kind of think about that for a deal ship, but I'm sure it's. I mean, I say it's fun, but it's probably scary for them. And but if you don't, if you have people out there, they're going to champion your product or your service. I mean it it makes it a lot easier for the switchover because there's no things that they don't have to think about. I mean six months down the road, once it you plantlets say, a brander's arm. Why aren't you telling me that, Steve Well Right, I should have. Would you know? I mean I think that goes yeah, that goes back to what we were mentioning earlier about these called them chapters, you know, chapters of installation. There's the initial wow of the product or the bud but then once maybe a month or two in. Where the that the the newness of the product or or the idea that we have a new piece of technology. Now we're into the daytoday and what's working, what's not working? What do we have to tweak? But to your point, is having this whole checklist of other things you may have to address, not just this technology, but does this effect pay plans? Does this speed up our process? Does this communicate to all the other departments? I always call it the octopus, you know, wherever you change one thing in any organization, they're are tentacles that touch other departments and have you thought them all through? I think that's we're having the right vendor partner who can guide you at least give you a list to say here are some things you maybe need to look at down the road, because most of my clients have done that. And then I like the fact also a partner ring them up with someone that's maybe a little further down, two or three chapters into the book, versus someone who's completed it and forgot about it and they can't remember back to that initial struggle potentially of changing behavior. Yeah, they got to be a litt relate and and that's...

...why I think the customer hat switch over three to six months ago. Where there's a site visitor, they talk him through, I mean me selling a software. A lot of times you can do this all virtually, but sometimes they just want to see our sales people embracing it for what we're doing. But but yeah, I will tell you just the we're all visual learners, I think, more so than anything. That's I can only imagine. I Like I look. I mean I know with Brian Pass as the Awa awards, you know, having the book. Nobody reads right. It's all got to be done digitally, though. I remember him saying that like two years ago and and I learned so much better with video and I think there's a lot more visual and audio learners obviously out there. So you sent them a brochure. I just I don't know, what can you get out of a brochure then seeing it in action? Right? Well, yeah, I think you have to repair yourself, and this is a great tip for organizations. To what Steve saying is I think you have to understand all three. There are people that can read a book, follow the manual and they can get up to speed. Other people need to watch it on a video pause it, do it. Another person needs somebody there with them to coach them. You have to you have to make that type of training available for all of them. So let me pit it because there's something you said and and I want to get your take on this. So you know we've installed and we know we've trained and you've mirrored everything like that. but You keep talking about the customer of today, this new idea of communication and connecting with the consumer today, and we have to do it in different ways and one of the things that you have advocated, probably since I met you, is this idea of video. Right, texting is great, people answer their text but there's something about video that connects on an emotional level. So talk to me about this idea of video. Like when you say communicate through video, what exactly do you mean? Yeah, well, when I guess, when I define the communication through video, I think what many people all do as I'll do the video. That's just a wanted done. And you know that's not what I mean. I mean just it very simple terms. If I'm going to write any email, just make it a video. That's it doesn't matter. Video can be done all throughout the sales process and then post sales process. Even if a customer is not buying for me, I will still son of the video. So it's just a matter if I'm thinking about it, I don't want to type it, I'd rather say it. So look, one hundred percent of the communication we do is, you know, in person. Right, there's that totality. You got words. When I type up that email, I'm only communicate get seven percent of my capacity and I'll tell you what them better than that. But when I get people on the phone, you know, tonality is thirty eight percent, you know, and then fifty five percent of body language. So, if you know, with covid and all these things that are going on and people are doing things virtually we're enhancing how we sell as individuals and you have to be able to if I can't get there, if I can give a message, you know, like if I'm selling a complicated product, maybe I'm going to show them something. Do a loom. You know, we have people that are doing product features and showing how people would do things. Obviously we have zoom, you know. That's you know video as well, and that's being right there. That timing is doing what we call live rooms. But if I'm going to send a personalized video, think of it as like a voicemail recording. You know, that's the way I look at I want to give somebody a message, but it's going to be a video, not something that's on somebody's recording. So I'm going to send you a video and I'm going to tell you what you need to do if you're coming into my store, what you need to bring. For example, maybe it's a birthday video, but the idea is I'm going to ask my communication. I don't want that communication misinterpreted. So I'm going to make sure you, as a customer, are going to watch and listen to my video so nothing's taken out of context. Right. Okay, so so I got it. I really like that. There's two parts that I really like. The the just to keep it simple for everyone who's listening. If you're in charge of a team of salespeople or you're a salesperson your charge of your own work, that concept of if you would type it into an email recorded as a video, it is it's going to have more depth. Right, if I leave a voicemail, they can't see me. If I text them, yes, you know a high percentage. You're going to open that. But what the other part I liked is it's open to mis understanding. They can't hear my passion, they can't see how excited I can't show them. I can show them a picture of a car or a video, but I'm talking. So there's so many ways to leverage video. I think more people. Well, let me ask you. Why do people push back and on not doing video? Is it just something that's new and we...

...haven't really embraced it yet, or is it fear, or is it, to your point, one and done? It could be it's usually fear, I mean I would say that. I mean you get, you try to get salespeople and want to do video. They don't. You know whether it's that fear of like, Oh, it's going to be put on facebook or Youtube, and this is we're talking about one to one communication. I mean that's the one thing. So if you're on the if you're doing a zoomie like what you and I are doing, shouldn't be scared. Right. I would tell you, like if you're trying to teach somebody what to do, you know and you're going to send an email and like like well, we do sometimes as we'll take snapshots, right, and you're putting in the email and somebody's got to read the email. What you're trying to point out if you did something like loom and say you see how this is, and you're recording your screen and you can literally tell them what to identify. They're hearing your tone there, there. It's not like your tone. They suck. Right, you know, when you read email, you're trying to coach them up. They may be saying, do quit insult in my team. We're doing the best. We right, right, and so what your loom, you can you know. Then you they could feel that empathy. Maybe, Hey, it's okay, you're not send as many videos, whatever it may be. But but that's what it is. It's fear and it could be that they don't know how to do it. So people got to coach them through something like loom or doing a personalized video. But also, I think too, is people got to see examples of video. When we go out and teach, you know, stores on how to do personalized video, for example in the car business, they got to see what other stores are doing. There's not really a repository of videos of hey, there's a walk around video, here's a confirm appointment video, here's a birthday video, here's a cobier video, here's you know, people want to see what other stores are doing to collect ideas. It said. The reason why that Tick Tock. You know, the one thing like I literally he just got on Tick Tock and you know, one of the things that people can do on Tick Tock is what you go out there and you find the Trans and it starts noodling ideas right on how I could do a tick tock video. That's the same thing. That, I think, is what we all need, because that's why I watch tick tock is I'm like, okay, what is this guy doing or what is this galder? How could I do that? How can I put a spin on it any kind of think about it? I just I'm literally have never said that before. Brian's but or Brian, I'm Glenn, but that right there is a great way to kind of think about video and with tick tock a good analogy. Right. Well, so, so the the the other piece of that that I like about video. I had a guest on a few episodes back. His name is Josh little and he created an APP called Volley. So what he does for into for businesses is, instead of calling somebody or even doing a zoom, his thought was, you know, as you and I are a boat talking, you're hearing and formulating your next question at the same time. So by taking time to create a video it can be more thoughtful, it can be a better communication. Right, if I don't like what I said, I can record it, rerecord it. Right. How many times we said something live? So Oh, I should I didn't explain it well enough or I wrote something. They just didn't understand what I wanted. But by recording the video, whatever it is, a birthday greeting, here's the information, I can look at it and go yes, I like that. I send it out, the person can consume it without having to worry that I have to respond. I can consume the video, watch it. Then if I want to return the video right now, I can record my response. But it can be a thoughtful response versus how many times did we send something or answered something? Say, you know, if I had two seconds, ten seconds, a minute, if I slowed down for just a second, I probably would have answered that better. And I think in this in what you're saying as a salesperson complete. It's very complex to sell this product called a car, and someone's overwhelmed, then the more you can walk them through and they can hear your voice, they build that trust stump. I think we miss that idea of understanding how much trust can be done over video, because I can see you, I can hear you, I can see what you're doing. So I think that the more that and it's interesting. Do let me. I should this. Do you think that younger people, they're because of what you said? Tick Tock, they almost are going emails. Why would I read anything? I'd rather watch a video. Why would you call me? I'd rather watch a video. Because do you think? Yeah, Right, oh no, that's a one hundred percent right. I mean. Well, I mean again, will they read an email? I mean, everybody's going to be different, but yeah, you if I when I'm going out there presenting on something like texting or video, you know I do study. You know the you know customers. So like the millennials and Genz's. Will they read, for example, and where will they even listen to voicemail? Right, and the answers as they don't. You know, you know what I mean. They bypass it, they delete it. Whatever. If they don't know the number, they delete it. So yeah, I mean I think every cusper is...

...going to be a little bit different on the way they want to learn. But you know, getting somebody to just change their thought process is going to be the challenge on anything, whether it's video. I think if you go out there were like, for example, Glenn, and you just kind of think how you're helping your customers. I'm thinking about this for the just the average salesperson. If I'm going to like be a value to an account, how am I going to help that account get better so they could maybe help their team get better? Right, you did something like a video, and it could be a you know, it could be a video like a like a thought of the week, right, or whatever it may be. But let's just say I'm showing like in my case, is crm. It's going to take me a lot of work to do snippets type it all the things. Now, if these are not going to be professional videos, I say hey, Glenn, like I'm taking a look here. Follow my mouse. I'm pointing to this because this is a what you want to be aware of. Tell your managers that's a lot easier and I don't have to make me edit the video or anything else. I just got to tell Hey, I'm sending you a video, watch the video and I would just tell you, depend upon what you're doing, break it up so it's not like, you know, a thirty minute video. I would need segments of like three minute videos so people can absorb it. So yes, I think that's another really great tip about video is keeping it short, keeping it to one topic. I'd rather have five videos sent to me, each with one topic versus one long video, because then if I have a question about the topic, I can always go back and find that one topic, versus where in that five minute video and then I'm it's not worth it and I don't want to do it. I agree with you. I think they're that a lot of a lot of people, especially younger. I look at my children, my two boys. I have a fourteen and a sixteen year old. The idea of reading emails, you know they'll do work, they'll read emails from school because they have to to catch up, but they don't communicate through email. They don't communicate Voice Mell they don't even communicate calling each other. They're friends, they text each other. And then, to your point, is they spend a majority of their time on video, you know, youtube platforms, Tick Tock, any of those instagram and scaring reels. And when they have a question, they're looking for a video of how to do it. They're not looking for a PDF, they're not going to a book, they're going to youtube to say how do I do x? So if to your point, if you're if that's the way people are searching you as a salesperson now, or providing that value for your customer to say here, here's the vehicle, here's there's the process, here's what you have to bring in when you come, here's how long it's going to take when you get here. Hey, when you bring your car in for a trade, here's what our process is, explaining the process. I think that breaks down those barriers and the more time that you're they're watching you, the more they start to build that rapport and they go I think I like this person. They seem like they're helpful versus someone else who's just going to send them an email or leave them a voicemail. Yeah, and the one thing that I'll just say, I mean, we're talking, I'll just talk about automotive on this but I can also talk about medical. But a lot of times what we have to do a better job of than sales, I don't care what you sell, is understand that the customer has probably the resources available through video or you do. You know all these different platforms. We got to know maybe more about the product than you do. So, as an example, I'll just talk about the medical industry. Every patient you know as a type to diabetic child or your type to diabetic, or you have lower back pain, whatever it may be. You know whatever you know, you want to research. There then forums with patients that are in those forums that could tell you the therapy, the medications, as an example. So you know what happens. You go to your doctor and you tell them what therapy want, you tell them what medication you want because you heard it in a forum. So everybody is technically a doctor and specialized in whatever it is that they have right. So now let's just talk about automotive, and that's the one thing that always drove doctor's nuts. So any doctors that are on this, that was all for you, because they don't like those patients. So now let's talk automotive. I could go out there and learn everything I want about whatever car I want. I know more about the car probably then the salesperson. All that I want is a good buying experience. So let's take the fact let's give customers, especially in automotive, let's just say, credit where credit is due, because it's a big purchase. Their researching. They want to know the safety, they want to know how fast it goes, whatever it may be. So all we have to do is kind of really just give the customer better experience, make it fast, make it easy. But but to that point that now you just had me thinking about something completely aligned to that is, I can...

...go find about the car, right, I can go find about whatever service I want, what I really want, but yet it's very hard for me to find is how you do business like, what your process is? What how long is it going to take? We know what makes you different in terms of your customer experience. They're not advertising that. There are a day everyone leans on the car and, as you said, I can find about the car. That's why I'm interested about the car, because I've done some research about the car, or a friend drove drove that car, or I used to drive that car. I like that car. Let's not. You know, we can talk about I want to know. What's my price? What what can I get done? How fast can you do it? To your point, what's the process going to be like? I think that is something that is woefully missing, totally in the industry and I think to your point, if you, if a salesperson spent time creating videos about that, because we already have a page on the website talking about the car, you could show them and say, Hey, here it is, this is the car, but now let me tell you about doing business with me. Here's the process, here's how long you need to do the I think that's such a huge opportunity to gain that customer, you know, customer to your to Your Business, when you start talking to them about how you do business. Well, everybody has a different way of their perception of customer experience, and I'll just give something as basic. I have a buddy that will pass up two subways to go to his third subway to get his cold cut combo because that subway is cleaner than the other two. Okay, so it. I mean again, that's his customer experience, right. I mean I just think that's always fun like, dude, it's right there. Let's know. Hope you do, but but I said there, let's a sandwich. I know that. But think about this. There are two home deep those near where I live, and I will drive an extra ten minutes to go to one because when I have a question, the employees walk me over to help me make sure I find what I want and and answer any questions. Versus the other one, they'll say, oh, it's on aisle thirty four. So I agree with you that there are differences. But to your point, we forget that that customers really that's what they're looking for. They will drive a little further for the better experience. But you have to advertise it. Now you have to deliver on it, all right, you've got to tell them what you do differently. You have to tell them. Here's all. That's where going back to what you said early in the episode when you said, you know, you have to help your customers. You have to have conversations with customers, you have to answer what they're looking for. And here's a huge opportunity that you sort of uncovered here in this conversation about, you know, using that video to show them who you are, what Your Business is, your dealership is, but it's not just the car. It's here's all the things you need to do to make it easy and faster to have a great experience with us. Yeah, you're promoting your integrity as well as your character and and now those are things when you're at the sale, that's that's what you know. How do you? You know, you gotta have if people buy from who they like or visit, you know who they you know like, it's that those are the things that you're going out there doing as the salesperson for wherever you're representing. So what you stand for is who you're going to attract. And and I we always say it's always built bound trust. But to your point, you know with video, that's what you're going to get it. You're going to get a lot of things conveyed subliminally without saying it, and you don't have to go out there and say you know and be proud of your character or talked about your tegrity. I mean that will be absorbed. You know, the one thing, like I joke around about this, because I didn't shoot a lot of video. I know we're talking a little bit about video. I never shot a video. Like all you know, twenty years ago or ten years ago or whatever. I just started doing video like literally seven years ago and I didn't have it figured out. People know you're so Chrismatic. I mean I love hearing that, but I just had never really thought of me as charismatic and I'm just like wow, you know. But I guess if people see that about me, great, you know, but I never that's I'd never thought of it like that, you know. And so it people can be that observant through my videos or talks that I'm doing, and that's awesome because that's who I am and that's what people are observing. So that's what video could do, is is going to give so many subliminal messages to that person and they're going to get to know you. Or could be your background, it could be that you...

...have like you're a chief fan, you're a jets fan, you're a reds fan, whatever it may be. You're opening up your door a little bit so cuspers can bond with you. If you're a blues fan, I'll probably bond with your black heart fan. Well, we'll be going to war right the world. But those are things video is just telling about. Not. It's all about you and what you're going to be conveyed to the customer anoy're going to see if they like no, and I think that's important. It's breaking down that barrier as a salesperson can customer, breaking it down to just say there's two people, were two people. I you know you're coming to me to get help on X. Reverses. I'm a have to come to you to get help on x. You know you you're yeah, you know you're a businessperson, you do taxes and you're coming to me to buy a car. Well, eventually those roles are going to change. I have to come to you to do taxes. But it's all about we're just people. We have we have our jobs, are expertise. The key is using video to be able to help expand that. To your point. You know you are who you are. If you meet you, you in real life, you are the same energetic person that you are here. Video is just capturing that and allowing people to see it. But this is the key for all of the people listening. You've been doing video, as you said. You said those would say you didn't say I did video one seven years ago. You say. Now I do video. So it's this. I see it over time. So going back to your one of your first points for salespeople listening, it can't be one and done. One video. People may be intrigued, but I need that second, third, fourth fifth video to validates what my first impressions were of you. Oh I like this person, but now you're gone. Where are you? But if I see that same helpfulness, thoughtfulness, experience, expertise, seven videos, eight videos, and then I meet you in person, it it aligns in, it locks and it just reinforces, I think, to your point of reinforces that character what I thought you were. You really are, because I've seen it seven times. Can't fake it seven times. Yeah, and and here I'll just throw this out there. I know it's a little bit off, but I'll bridge it to what you just said there. But let's just say you're going to send an email. You just don't know where that email is going to go. Right and again the tone of the email. But I want you to think if I send an email, that's going to be like coaching. Like I would tell you do a loom video or do a personalize Vida, whatever it is, I would always do a video. But if you're going to send that email, how do you start that email? Blen, you would probably say, please, don't take this email out of context. I'm trying to coach you. If you don't do that, you never know how that email is going to start off. But I will tell you, as a professional, I will always say, please, don't take this out of context, because I want them to know that I'm trying to help them. If you don't state that, you could be ripping them. But with video now I could coach. I can, you know, break down that barrier. They see I'm trying to help them, whatever it may be. But again, they're they're your if they are going to forward that email, they're going to forward that video and if that video does go up chain, no matter what you're selling, they're going to see that you're a valuable partner to that organization so you can retain that business. So that's the way I kind of look at it as well, the power wood video can do to an organization. No, I think that's great. And just as you're talking that idea of someone else can watch the video as well. You know, how often have we been at a you know, an event, a conference or in this case we're talking about sales. Someone comes in, meets a salesperson, goes home and tries to explain to their spouse what that person said. Well, could be completely different, or it's easier to communicate what they said if I show you the video and say, Hey, are you can watch this, you can see the conversation we had. Yo, could you record what we just talked about so I could bring it home and show x y Z. I think that also is a benefit of using video, and that is a good tip, I think, for salespeople. If I'm if someone saying I have to go talk to someone else, record the conversation, record what you talked about, go show take a video of the car that they're looking at and text it to them. What's your number? Let me send this video to you so that them when you're home, you don't have to memorize it. You can say here's exactly what they said and in a way you can say you're holding me accountable to it because I just recorded it. There's no, well, that's not really what I said. Well yet no way.

If you're going to put it on video, you better make sure your crystal clear to yeah, that's why I like you know, when you're doing let's say you got a proposal, for example, and you're going to do a proposal, let's say on video, and maybe it's going to be a loom or maybe you got the sheet front you and you can talk about it. You better make sure that proposals around on the money before you do it. So I mean those are the things, but again, you got to have the confidence to do it. You got to make sure everything is right. But I'll tell you what, when you do that stuff, then multiple people could go through it, and you know that somebody like myself, or let's say I'm showing my wife, I'd say, Hey, honey, here's the proposal. The guy went through it. What's your thought? You know, versus reading, and what am I reading? You know where am I looking at. So well, yeah, and you I I think that's really huge because also you try to vouch for someone else's character, but now I can show you the video of them and that breaks down the barrier. I think that's well. So let's let's let's pivot again here, because you just said you know, you know your passion and through your journey. So let's walk back. Tell me a little bit about you know, when I've met you few years ago, you are who you are right now, meaning very passionate about your product, passionate about sales, passion about customer experience and you are just your energy is not low. All right, so well, it may seem like that on this, but I well, well, let's I'm sure. I'm sure you're a serious talk I'm sure you sleep sometimes. No, so let's I'm always asked me and my guests about their journey, because a lot of people are seeing this not a finished product. But you know what I mean, like you're you're who you are right now and everyone, to your point, looks at and says, Oh, that's so easy for Steve or look how great. I could never be like that. So let's roll back. Let's roll back to maybe, you know, high school, junior high, you know, and then your journey from then to now. If we roll back and look at Steve and ninth grade or ten grade, is what's similar to what you you know, what stayed with you this whole time, and what's a little bit different or evolved or changed from Steve During this journey? Oh Man, going back to high school, well, I was always a social guy, I mean, and I knew what I wanted it to be. I think my two brothers and my dad they were engineers. So I was always on the path being the baby of the family and I said, well, I'm going to be an engineer and went to college missoo and got an engineering degree. But I knew I didn't want to be that guy sit behind the desk based on, you know, I was that guy throwing the parties right. I mean I just was. I'm a party guy. I was a social you know, in engineering. One of the favorite interviews I had I went to engineering sales interviews at Missoo and one I always remember this question. It was kind of funny to go you know, you're an engineer by degree, but you want to go into engineering sales. Why? I said, well, those engineers that went engineering jobs they built and added more power to the stereos. I'm using them. So that was my answer to get into sales. So that was how I got my first sales job actually, but anyway, I just knew I was social. So my first five years my career I got an engineering sales you know, and back in those days, I mean you know again, I've always used a crm. I used act remember that act I was my first crm to Al rite out of college that I used. There was also a gold mine, there was leap frog, there were just all these crm tools that I use. Then I buddy of mine. I had several different jobs in engineering just coming out of college, but then I got in medical and and I'll tell you what, that was a huge transformation to go from engineering into medicals. So I got into pharmaceuticals, like what many people do, but in pharmaceuticals I just you know, I was young and I got bored. Just got bored. There's usually a part in, I always say, everybody's life where you like is it a job or is it a career? And I think a mentor told me that way back when, like you're in job mode, dude, you're not in career mode, and I just wanted to be better explain, explain for your audience what you think the difference between job mode and career mode is. Well, job mode for me is I just get up and I go to work and then I'm done. I can you know, I was never dedicated to my craft, my profession. You know, I would I would take off early or you know, I just my I wasn't just in the game with those companies. I mean, quite frankly, so you are learning. You weren't trying to figure out that you were punching the clock, so to speak, and not once you were done, didn't think about it till tomorrow morning when I punched in exactly now. Again, you got to keep it mine. I was in pharmaceuticals and pharmaceuticals back in those days...

...you could write your own ticket when it comes to you know, when you work. So it's a little bit different when it came to pharmaceutical sales back in the day. But when I challenged myself, and I always said that, you know, in the pinnacle of Pharmaceutical Rep is to get in the surgery. So that was my goal and when I got my opportunity to work at Metronic, that was like my dream job. I was in the R I was doing neuropathic pain, back surgeries, I was doing deep brain stimulation for Parkinson patients. I mean just I wasn't a door but I played one on TV. I always say, you know that, but but to see patients get a therapeutic response to whatever therapy I was selling, that's that's what I did for you know, you know, between pharmaceuticals and then Medtronic, and then I was testing you know, well, that medtronic was a little bit different. But but I learned. Okay, this is probably where I learned that a job versus career. Okay, so I got let go. What I learned was at Medtronic it was it's hard to defend ninety percent of what you got. I mean, just thinking about what you mean. What do you mean by it's hard to defend ninety percent? Well, when you're a big fortune five hundred company and you know ninety percent of the market, right, that ninety one percent a big that's hard to do, right. So, you know, be big companies. You know let people go. And this is where my career started in the world of startups. So the last fifteen years of my life I've been all start up company. So when I got let go, it was just when the market was crashing with the housing and things of that nature. But I came across a company called Dinal labs. It was in the St Louis Incubator spot and I grew that company over five years and it was just I never I couldn't say drug names, didn't know the therapy of the drugs and here I am selling a compounding pharmacies. But that's where my career started, I think. I mean, I think everything else was just a job. But when you got to work for a startup and you could get passionate, you were army, a one the whole company. The pressure was on me to go out there and grow the company and that was that challenge that I guess I still to this day could not, I I can't replicate that. I don't know what you would call it, just that the challenge. I mean it's really all it is. It's the challenge of growing something. And so I did that at two different companies in medical. But when my buddy came to me and he knew I was a crm advocate, because I ucrm all throughout my career and hence he said, Hey, do you want to get out of medical and get into cars, I like you freaking kidney. I could go to the mail clinic, I could go to John Hopkins. I was out in California when Michael Jackson passed. You know what I mean. I mean, I still I mean just little things like that. When he passed at UCLA. But, you know, I just think about like dears. There's no way I you know, just what's the head trash of car sales people. But when he showed me the CRM, I just I'm passionate about crm because that's what really catapulted me in my career. Is I've always leverage the CRM. So I'm very passionate. That's why when I got in Cere, I'm didn't know a clue anybody. I wasn't given dealer's names or networks or things like that. I let my video you know. I mean I just went out there. I sent a ton of video out there, put my face out there, because that was one of the differences of what I could do in a crm. And there I am. I mean everything else is you know, it's built relationship ships, it's I've just been fortunate enough to be in this business house seven years with a startup company where we had thirty five rooftops and now we're at seven hundred. It's a lot of hard work, blood, sweat, tears, crying with owners and partners and I mean it's just been a fun journey. But now that I'm what fifty years old, I told my wife this is my last startup, you know. So I'm done. Yeah, but you know what you say that. But what I'm hearing is it's it's finding that challenge and I think that's something for for for all of us and for anyone who's listening. You know, if you feel like you're in career mode, I mean in job mode versus career mode, if you're don't have that challenge to get better or feel that you can have an impact and that's what you want. Now again, if you have a job and you've convinced yourself that's my career and I make x amount of dollars and I'm very happy and that's phenomenal. I always say, if that's your goal to make whatever, write it down a piece of paper and you have your freedom and you're good, then phenomenal. Then maximize what you're doing, be there, don't slough off, but then also don't complain that you don't you want something else. Right, but I think for you, what's really important, for everyone to really latch on is that having that challenge, having that that's what drove or maybe I wouldn't say drop, would you say? Having that challenge...

...focused everything that you did before, because it sounds like you were always so show you are always a hard worker. It didn't seem like you were not willing to put in the time and the effort. But something was different when you went to that start up where there was that sense of maybe being more out in the open. Do you think there were signs post or responsible hump? I think there were signs if I go back and I look at my journey and I think these are all things that I think salespeople are just anybody for that matter. There's science throughout the course, probably in your s to s where you're going to have a sign. So I remember when I first got married, for example, and I'm again they just a big company mentality. I remember having to sit at home and wait for a phone call to see if I had a job. Okay, and those are never time. I just got married. You know that. I'll tell you whether there's nothing more stressful. And you know I've been laid off a couple of times just because of downsize and with it with big companies, and when I got to let go at that last time I mentioned Medtronic, and I've found the world of startups. I would tell you. If I was to go back and kind of, you know, help encourage maybe younger folks right now, where would you start as a job or to start thinking about a career earlier? I would always challenge you to think about startup companies and and if you go into a start up and let's say you're going in sales or you're an engineer, whatever profession you may be, you're going to learn so much because you have so much responsibility. You're going to wear a lot of different hats. You're not expendable like you are a big company. And I always tell salespeople, if you're young, go to start up. A lot of the people we hired at our companies were always young and I knew I was leading the ship and sales and I'd say, dude, it's a hard ride. It's hard ride, but man, give us a couple of years and you're going to love it. You know, it's got who's leading the ship right. That's what's going to be dictating if here's if the company is going to be successful. But that's where I would tell young people is kind of look at you know what's happening, but at some point there's going to be a shift and signs are happening to you that's going to alter your job thinking to a career thinking mode. Yeah, and I like that because I agree with you. I've been in smaller companies. My wife always says to me, you know, you've never worked for a big company. You know, no, never have. And she she built her curt you know, she has two very successful careers or to she led two large companies divisions. But she said there's a lot of you know, politics and there's a lot of different short where for smaller companies you have a conversation, just like we are. And okay, let's test it and off we run and versus meetings, more meetings, maybe not focus groups. In six months later, nothing still happening. And I think you're right in to really get a sense of what you like or what you don't like being in that small environment. You're going to be at the table for all of these conversations and you're going to be understanding what the finances are or the development of the product are, because they're looking for your feedback from what you're doing and talking to customers. When you get into those large companies, those processes, those walls have already been built out and now you're in your silo. And so you're right. Your you don't learn, you just have to come in and perform that one task, do it really well, but that's still doesn't protect you. But in that initial phase, you're right. Everybody needs everybody in order to see if this is a viable thing. I love that. I love that feedback for people to get into a startup, if that's what you're looking for in your career, if you're unsure, to test and try so many different things. But you got to still have that passion which you said. demetrious nail or, I just interviewed him the other day and he always said hard work is the differentiator. Right, that's it. You got a card to have to have to have to put into time and do the work. And Yeah, and look, there's just different points. You know, if you're married, you got a family, like, look, I these two, a couple of startups I had. I had no insurance, gun, no insurance. Can you imagine that? So again, there's risk, but there's rewards. So it's really all about it. If I was single again, though, and I could do it, I mean again, I was a healthy kid, but you know, those are going to be things that you got to think about. You know, depend upon you know who you are. Those are the risks that I took and they paid off. And Yeah, I'm still young at fifty, but you know, I keep thinking about you know, the other two startups I've got, they're very successful. One just sold not too long ago and the other one is proven success. And then, you know, the one I'm at is still proven to be successful. We continue to grow and I was just going to say, like, you know, instead of defending ninety percent, I'm taking ninety percent, and that's a big difference when you're coming in sales. Is like, you know, when we have in...

...the automotive industurers like Eighteenzero rooftops, I think is the number that I was always told. So we started out with thirty five. Well, now we have seven hundred. You know I mean, we're not that ten percent mark, but you know I mean, we're getting you know, we're inching up to that. Yep, and you know I mean, and that's where I mean it's easier to take market share away from the big boys and then those bigger companies are probably reorganizing and hiring outside firm and they let people go and you seen it in the industries, but that's notoriously of big companies and I never want to put my family at risk. You know, I've never in the last fifteen years ever had to wait and see if I had a job and I can't tell you what a peace of mind that's been. Yeah, that's great. That's great. That's a great way and that's a great way to wrap up this topic about career and job mode, because I think that's a really important topic because I think many people confuse they think they're in a rear. It's really a job and it's not that it can't be a career, it's your attitude towards it. Right. You can have a career in automotive or you can have a job in automotive. You can have a career in sales where you're moving and learning and growing and taking a more responsibility, or you can have a job in sales. It's just your focus and what you're trying to do. So I really like that. So let mean, let me just say one more thing about that guy. Think this is what he hears when you're in career mode is you put the extra effort and people recognize the effort. It's not always an eight five it or ninety five. It's the extra effort. You're willing to do extra things and those are things that you know. You can ask yourself, are we doing these things? And that could be just job mode versus career so just little sublittal yeah, I think. And again I go back to what Demetrius in the episode. He talked about was every day just saying can I do a little bit more? Can I get a little bit more? That's career mode versus job mode, which is what time do we finish? What Times lunch? You know, though, if those are the high points of your day, if I come in and I'm worried about what time are we eating and what time are we leaving, probably in job modeb mode. When's break time? When's your breakdown? You know how much pe five o'clock here exactly. That's job out. Okay, so at the end of every episode. So first off I want to thank you for being here. This is fun. Like they say, these conversations just roll and I could sit and chat with you always, always, always, so at the end of every episode I ask a few random questions. Don't have to do with anything that we've talked about. Get to know you a little more. They're called the one so whatever, one thought, one word answer, what pops into your head. That's what I want to hear. Scary, it can potentially be there. All right, so well, we'll we'll throw this one out first. Something you've been reading or listening to or watching that has been inspiring to you that you would recommend to the audience. We're right now, as a company of Reading a book called Spin selling. So selling, okay, spit and selling. So that has been, you know, like I've been a lot of sales training and things of that over my career. But there's a definitely a couple of good techniques. I mean, I always say is any time you read a book or or listen or watch a video, and I'm not a big book reader, so I'm doing the audiver audio version, but but yeah, just taking some of the tips and tricks as far as different types of questions task customers to make him more fans is one of the key takeaways I love in that book. Right, great, great, we will put that. Will throw it into the show notes. And then also, we've been did, since it's the end of the year I've been taking all of the book recommendations at the US have offered and pushing them out there, so this way people can pick them up. All right, next question. You like to travel. Where's one place that you have not been to that you would like to go to? Well, if it's, if I mean, I'm always going to say Switzerland, the man, I want to ski the Alps. That's where. That's my dream place to go, or Ireland. But if it's we're going to say here in the states. So no, that would go ahead. Okay, go ahead. Well, I would say main or Montana. Okay, you're sticking with the letter m. We like that. We're letting never I've never been the main. I just I'd never been there. So okay. What is one piece of advice that a mentor gave you that has always doesn't even have to be a mentor, could be, that has stuck with you and that you always go back to and remember? Yeah, no, I think I said it on this is head trash. Head trash, by the definition that I was given, is especially in sales, or it could be anything. Is You. It's your mind is beating you on what...

...you should be doing. So for example, I'm I just don't want to go to the gym today. You know, you're mentally talking yourself and then what do you do? You don't go to the gym. So you know, in sales, a perfect one was I was just in Nashville not too long ago and there was a dealer. I told me no. I mean it's a big organization, but I went down there and I just have I was like hey, I'll just stop by and say hello, and I stopped in there and said, you know what, we're putting you back on the books in January. But the head trash when I was down there said, manny, why would I go see somebody that told me no? You know I mean, and you just never know. So I always learned it. Don't listen to head trash. You know, if you're thinking about it, do it. So head trash could be I don't want to call this person, but you're thinking about that person, call right just now. Don't let your head trash dictate your decision. It's very funny you try to say about calling that. I always joke when I butt dial somebody, yeah, I should, I should, I call them back or I talk to them. I said, there was a reason that I hit your number. What's going on? So you know respond to that. But I really like that about head trash, because we do get caught up into the shouldubs, I should be doing this, and that's because also we let outside influences that we see, especially on social media, and we think someone has it better than us or they're working harder than us, and really the only thing you really can focus on is your own action. So I really like that. All right, two more questions. One is if I brought all of your family and your friends, close friends who know you into a room and ask them to describe you in one word, what do you think? The one word they would use? Infect ships, infectious. I like that one. So I have to wear mask around you because you're perfectious. Or is I have everybody around me? Do you actually it's not mean. So here's this, here's funny thing. It's the reason why they would always say that. As they know, that's my interview questions. So typically on an interview, if somebody ever says, what's one word to describe yourself? And I'm so funny. My daughter actually just said this on one of her interviews, that she stole it from me, but I always say infectious, and the reason why is nobody else will say that. And literally you went to the dementia that I knew you'd go into. Is I wear a mask on you? Yeah, but it's going to alter the question right back ass act like everybody that's around myself anyway. Well, that's fun. See, I love that. I love always breaking that. I when I coach people on interviews, I always try to ask them to ask a question of the person who's interviewing you, because they fall into those questions. What do you think? Where do you see your company in five years? Like, I don't know. You know what I'm saying. So I always give them a question to say. Why am I here, like why are we doing this interview today? Why? Why Now? Why not six months ago, or why not six months in the future? What's going on that you we you're trying to do this now, and that wakes people up. The interviewer goes, Oh, well, this and it unlocks the conversation allows you to sort of understand their mentality of why they're looking for someone right now. Is it growth? Is it's someone got fired? I think that I like doing that too, and I really like infectious. I think that's a good one and it does describe what you'll will ever say it other than in me man, nobody will ever say your daughter. She's just proved that. That's right. She's she's doing well. At least it's in the family. Okay, last question before we wrap them talk about a lot of things. If you said to the audience, or had hoped that the people listening to this took one thing away from this, the whole conversation, the one thing, and you're going ahead. I hope this is the one thing. They they they took away. What would that one thing be? Well, you know, I mean again for salespeople, I think they have to define who they are. And you know I mean. I told the story. I got my dog. He's like scraping the floor. So you hear that. That's what that's all right, dogs are right, welcome, but it's not. No, I just you know, in sales I always say be yourself. You know everything that I'm doing right now. This is who I am. I'm not trying to be somebody I'm not. You know who I am from an integrity perspective. Character. You're going to decide that and that's how you're going to be reflecting yourself cash if that's really bothering me, man. But, but that's what it's all about in sales. But you know, I think the thing that I always try to inspire people who do is be the best that you can be. You're going to find out who you can be through your journey of life and whatever is going to make you passionate, you're going to learn that through the course of your career. You don't and find out what that is. And a lot of jobs may tell you who you are, but you know when you're when you choose your career path, do it with passion, do it to...

...the best of your ability, use the right tools available to you and don't be scared of somebody says, Hey, we're doing video, and you know that that person's number one, number two, number three, number four in your district and your number ten. And you have to grow listen to the people that are excelling. And these are some of the things that I've done in the course of my career that have expedited my growth. I mean, I believe me, I've gone through some challenges that I'm not sitting there saying, and I got a silver spoon, but when you're in startup, no insurance family. I mean there's been a lot of challenges. So work hard and and be a part of the industry you are in and, you know, potentially be a thought leader, be a part of your company, be an expert, just invest study it. I mean, like I said, it's like I've been in three different careers, engineering, medical and now automotive, and I could tell you, like I wasn't too keen in my engineering days, but in the medical days, yeah, I mean I could speak therapies, I could I was like a doctor, right, right, as I said. But now in automotive, you know, I'm this engagement expert. I'm a crm expert, and people just say, tell me how you did it. And you know, I just appreciate the stage, but I hope somebody took that away and and just improves their life and got any questions, they could always reach out to me and talk about pivotal times of their life and I'll be bored happy to give them some thoughts. I appreciate that. that. That's great and so listen, Steve. I appreciate that. That's some really good stuff because it ties right back into what we're talking about. Career, in job, and the more that you are invested in your company, invested in your career and you're constantly learning and being present and giving that that's what's going to lead to success. It's not always easy, it's not like you were saying, not silver spoon. There's going to be ups and downs, but at the end of the day, if you always fall back on my willingness to learn, my willingness to work hard, be open, you'll get through anything. So I do appreciate that. So listen, thanks so much for being here. Really, like I said, I'm just so glad that we have connected and we we chat a lot and we see each other and we share a meal every once in a while, but I am so happy for your success. It's just, you know, all the hard work. You really are making a difference and that's really impressive and fun to watch. So tell everyone how they can connect with you online and where to find you. Folks, you should be connected with Steve. So where. Where can they find well, on my background here, you got all my handles on my different social medias. But yeah, they went here connect up with me on Linkedin. I mean probably that's been a platform I've used the most. Linkedin. I kind of professional, so you know, always look me up. Steve, wrestler upset Linkedin. I just created the live with drive guy channel on Tick Tock. So if you want to have some fun with videos, there you go. There's a my tick tock chain handle is a live with drive guy. But yeah, I mean those are the best ways get a hold me. It's through social media. Awesome, awesome, awesome. Okay. So again, apreciate your time, audience. Please connect with Steve. He is someone who you should follow and learn from, and he will answer if you do reach out, and he will always be someone to help you. He is that type of a gentleman. So you know the drill. Folks, listen, subscribe. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Or, if you're an android user, over on spotify as well. You can always jump over to the Youtube Channel and watch the conversation with Steve and myself. If you did find value today, please make sure you share it out. I'm sure there's someone who could benefit from what Steve Just told you. I know there's a lot of places for you to watch and consume content. To fact that you spend some time with Steve and myself today means the world to me. I really do appreciate it. As I say at the end of every episode, you're in charge, but now Steve gave you a few more tips and tools to help you become better, both professionally and personally. I look forward to seeing you on the next episode, Steve. Thanks again. Have a great holliday set out it. Look forward to seeing you, my friend. You gotta but thanks again to You.

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