"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 117 · 9 months ago

Leadership Accountability is Key to Success with Jennifer Suzuki

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Practice, Practice, Practice. We demand that of our sports team but do we demand it from ourselves? How often do you practice your skills? As a leader, do you hold yourself accountable to set aside time each day to really practice and then be available to your employees as they execute their tasks, or "play their game"?  

That is the question today's guest, Jennifer Suzuki poses. Leadership accountability has to be consistent. In order to maximize your team's performance, you have to balance time between executing and practicing. And it is up to the leader to hold themselves accountable to do this.  

 Jennifer brings over 25 years of experience to the automotive industry. She is a well respected trainer who brings a straight forward way of sharing her strategies. So much great information.   

Enjoy it. Don't forget to subscribe and please share it as well Thanks 

 About Jennifer Suzuki  

Jennifer Suzuki is the Founder & President of eDealer Solutions, Inc., the first automotive internet sales training company and a pioneer in digital sales. The activity based training company focuses on dealership leadership and their sales teams to deliver a fluid, time-efficient and seamless guest experience that increases showed appointments, sales retention and CSI.  

The digital sales online training system has enabled thousands of dealership teams immediate information to converting leads into sales. Her 25 years of experience includes: President of e-Dealer Solutions, In-Dealership Sales Trainer, six-year Guest Instructor at NADA Academy, NADA eight-year Convention Speaker, OEM, State Association, Twenty-Group Speaker, and Northwood University graduate. 

  She has a tremendous reputation for delivering significant success to dealerships looking to focus on digital and phone processes through profitable actions for all departments.  

 She can be reached at Jennifer@edealersolution.com or text 954.873.8029.  

About Glenn Pasch:   

"Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”  

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.    

 Let’s Connect:   

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/​

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/​

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

Support for this episode comes from PCG digital. It is anywhere from difficult to impossible to manage every aspect of the changing digital landscape. Rather than trying to do it yourself, why not leave it to an award winning team of Digital Marketing Specialists who have mastered at all connect to your message with more potential customers with PCG digital. Go to PCG digitalcom for more information. Practice, practice, practice, now, I'm sure that makes sense for all of us who played sports in school or watch our favorite sports teams. Were always talking about making sure that they're practicing, because on Sunday or whenever you're watching your game, we want our athletes performing at a very top level and if they're not, we look right to the coach and we're saying you're not helping them get better. Well, my question to you, be it if you're leading a team or an organization, or even if you're just an individual on a team, how much are you practicing your skills to make you better? And if you are leading a team, do you have time in your day that you're focused on training and development, or at least watching your team play the game, so to speak, so that you have real information when you're back in your training sessions to help them develop to be better. So today's guest, Jenner for Suzuki, is a top trainer in the automotive space. She helped sales teams accomplish what we just talked about. How to structure their days to make sure training is done off the field, so to speak, meaning before we start interacting with customers, as well as being present to be able to watch your team plays so that you can give valuable feedback, and how to deal with being pulled in a million different directions as a leader. We're all getting pulled away, but how do we get back locked in on that focus? I'm really excited. Her Passion is phenomenal and she's also going to share her journey from where she started selling cars to where she is today. So let's dive into today's episode of You'R in charge conversations that spark change with Jennifer Suzuki. Okay, Jennifer, thank you for being here. I'm really excited because I've known you and followed your career and I really do see you as someone who affects change in organizations. You go in and you have a truly do have an impact to their bottom line. So when you're going in or someone's raising their hand to bring you in, obviously there's something they want to improve on and it could be either process, it could be accountability, could be training. What are some of the things that business is are missing, that you're seeing when they're doing all this marketing to drive traffic, get people raising their hands, getting them interested, but yet we seem to miss really maximizing those opportunities. So say either of those, all of them. What are some of the what are some of the biggest things that you're running across? I could be easy fixes if somebody was in charge of a team and they're sort of struggling. Yeah, now that's a really good question and there's a lot to unpack in that question. Let's let's take it from you know, the basics. Like you said, they're driving a lot of opportunities through marketing. Any business is putting that money out there, no matter how much it is, it means something because, you know, we got to get a return on investment. But the challenges is that without a process, you know, even if you have the people it, if you don't have the process, this is where we get the disconnect and the process is ever changing and that is actually one of the things that I think limits a lot of possibilities for growth in businesses today. Is Not refining the process. And you know what I'm talking about. You've seen some of these businesses where you go...

...into their crm and you look at some of their sales processes and some of them are automated. Automated sales process in two thousand and twenty one. Going into twenty two is not authentic, is not human, it is so obvious and it turns buyers away. And if it is one of the first replies and First Impressions of an organization, a person, a professional institution, that one's probably a miss. Any event, that's one small example. Now some people say, well, Chat Chee's. I mean, we've got thousands of leads, we got to have some sort of automation. I get it, but frankly, we have a world of ai out there at our fingertips and AI is driving a more human side response, at more human response and and feels a little more authentic. And I guess my point is this. It's updating sales processes. Okay, so so let's let's talk about that because to your point. You Open up some of these CRM's and we have our processes built in now. They can either be, as you were saying, preprogram this is what you send out, or it could be a placeholder. said here, sort of the topic that you want to talk about, your first one. How often do you see organizations do what I'll call spring cleaning? For example, they bring you in and you guide them. Yeah, a year from now, two years from now, someone else comes in or they get a new manager and they put theirs in and it seems like no one ever goes back and says, do we even use this anymore than why is it here, versus someone who's just skimming through going, Oh, I've never tried this one before, and you're you're sending something out that to your point. It it's not connected to what your message is today. A grade and things have changed so much, even when you look at auto responses for after hours talking about COVID and protocols. I mean, yes, we're still in Covid, yes we still have protocols, but it looks dated because that was from twenty months ago Covid, you know what I mean. And then again it just sort of as a miss from that client experience. To answer your question about spring cleaning, let me say it is next and never my friend, and that is why we're having this conversation, because it is necessary. In fact, I would be looking at it. I'd be looking at that sales process every thirty days because it matters in and you know what, even even and just it's not even just that auto response. You know it's a it's when it sets up the auto the sales process, the auto sales process, and it prompts our sales team to do this particular follow up on at this particular time. Oftentimes, in that task it'll have like a proposed template and in that sales person, if, without instruction, they could be new to the business, that templates dated. There's it's just a miss in the language, the representation of the person of the business of what's going on right now. I mean, let's face it, every the supply chain in any industry has been impacted, and is that something we need to put out their front and center. I mean, people know about it and it's relevant and we got to hit them with it early on. So, you know, these are some of the things that I, like you said, spring cleaning is necessary. And it's so. It's automated sales tasks, it's the email templates. I can tell you the template list is long and fierce and outdated and I have if you ever watch a salesperson do their job, because I'm always looking for efficiencies. I want to tighten things up to make sure that we got a clear representation of a fluid, seamless buying experience and at the same time representing the character of our company. And when I look at the...

...list of templates in there, that someone's got a figure out which one they're going to send. That right there, my friend, is a time stealer and it can impact an organization success. So so for all of you listening, you can hopefully you're taking notes and you're going to have a nice list after this because again, one of the reasons Jen Geni is here is she speaks tactical. So just right there is that idea of spring cleaning. When was the last time anyone look through and said, if you know, it's like doing spring cleaning in your closet? When was the last time I wore this? If I don't remember, make a decision. Do you want to keep it or not? If it's not get rid of it or donate it. Same thing with your templates or your old processes. Get rid of them and really ask yourself, is this something that we want to share with our customers? So that's number one. Now number two would be your opinion on this. What I've seen at times is because we either have different departments teams handling different parts of the process. Very rarely is it connected. High performing dealers do connect it. I should say that that's the reason why they're high performing, but that idea of one hand doesn't know what the other ones doing. The lack of communication, word lack of synergy in types of responses, because the way I may answer something and then I hand it over to you, you're going to have a completely different voice. So, so Talt, let's talk about that. How do I connect if I have a group of Business Development or BDC folks in automotive or appointment setters? You know you have appointment setters in other industries who their job is just to get the person to an appointment and hand it over to a salesperson. How do we connect that? What are some of your best tips to making sure that we're the departments are connected and talking to each other. To your point, to keep that seamless customer experience versus a customer feeling like I have to start zero again. Yeah, yeah, yeah, which is a total miss. And Boon deals forward and getting those online reviews. That's going to drive more traffic. Okay, this is there's a lot in that as well. So, at a basic level one at a basic level, we have to try to hire people who care, who care enough to see that there's a problem and do something about it. We have to hire people and Nurture people and Mentor this team to not only collaborate together, but to communicate effectively amongst each other using the tools that we have at our fingertips. There are plenty of free tools out there to keep us all connected. But if you don't care about that customer experience, you're just banging out phone calls, the set appointments and get them on the board and you don't put a whole lot of notes in the system, you know when you have that customer come in, knowing that your colleague set that appointment and and that customer came in and you didn't put the notes in there about that customers time and the store. You didn't care. You know what I'm saying, like these are the things that, at a base level, have to be intact in order for us to achieve, you know, maximum performance. Lastly, just let me just jump in here a second, but so to that, then someone's okay, I'm in charge of one of those teams. What if I'm my team's doing at the other team isn't doing it? Or this idea of hiring someone who cares? Okay, I care, but isn't that more what you're talking about? Accountability up the line? Because eventually, if no one cares above me, dude, is net a trickle down fact where someone's going to turn around and go, well, why am I busted my ass if they're not busting their ass, I'm not going to do it anymore. So where does that? where I mean we're is the WHO's Cho who's in charge of connecting all this and making that accountability...

...of caring? I mean, Glen, that's a really good point and that's why I mentioned mentorship. It's a piece that's missing and a lot of sales teams we hire people to feel seats and most people don't get the knowledge, the education on what the expectations are of the sales process, let alone the circle back and inspection of the process to be idet to identify right misss and strengths. And the misses oftentimes come from not caring enough to put the information in there. On the other hand, it's oftentimes because nobody showed me the process, you know. And so yes, leadership, mentorship on an ongoing basis is what's going to help people recognize how we do care for each other and and, you know, just to carry that on a little bit further. Tools out there like what's APP and and Group me or slack. I would highly recommend using some sort of tool like this to keep those communications open amongst teams and make it part of the process. Things that you do hold them accountable and things that you do mentor on is effective communications, because when those customers have special circumstances and there are they're expecting certain things to take place, maybe more so than other customers, if that's not commuted to the front let communicated to the front line who's going to be meeting this person right the face, then we miss once again. Yeah, it kind of care enough to put that message out there to the team. So people really welcome this customer. And Yeah, and I think what you're touching on, it goes back to what you initially started with, is this idea our processes is end end, meaning I always talk about reverse engineering. You know, how do I want my customers to feel when they leave? A great okay, then what does my team have to do to make them feel that way? And then once we have that, we can build a process. Then we can find the technology that supports that. But there is a key point. It's training, but I think we always miss the word and development. Right, development seems ongoing. So when, when you step into an organization, is it process more or is it the fact that that training, Daily Inspection, coaching and development? Is that one of the pieces? I find a lot of people do a very decent a very decent job front in new higher training, bring somebody in, but know what, there is no coaching and developing. So so what are you seeing out there? Or how out how is how are you helping solve that problem for your clients? Here's my experience, and it's because it's managers that are in their roles without mentorship themselves or without the know withal or experience to run a team. They might have been really good salespeople. They were the hitters and then they advanced into a roll without the proper on boarding themselves to be able to develop people. They got the other the other side of the coin, you know, hold profit. They got that part down solid, but when it comes to the other side, developing people, that's the part that seems to be the missing link. When I work with organizations, it's one of my first approaches to the success of our relationship and I say it all the time. Don't let me train your team unless we train the managers, because if they don't know the process, they can't coach it, they can't mentor it, they can inspect it. And if it's sales team knows a process and the managers don't know how to do the process, and I just want you to know this, two very...

...different things here, knowing it and doing it right, which is our next step with our leadership, and because things are changing so rapidly out there in the sales processes. It is next to impossible if your fingers not on the pulse, if you're not expecting change, if you aren't looking for change, you know what I mean, you're not going to go out there and do the changes that it's going to take in order to attract business and move deals forward. And I'll give you some quick examples. With supply chain restraints the way that they are, it's impacting the way that callers call the stores and the questions that they ask. It's creating more objections, in my opinion. Then and and new objections then we had a year ago, six months ago, and I swear every month it's something new. You know, at this point, customers already know it's going to be tough to get the product that they're looking for. Customers already know they're going to be having to be more flexible than usual there. They're going to spend a lot more time looking for what they they want and then at sometimes throwing up their arms and just saying what do you have? You know, but these impact the sales process and we had to mitigate some of the risk of losing opportunities by simply having basic responses like no, we don't have that right now. Actually, no one has it, or we're not. We don't plan to get it until Q one. You know what I mean, like things like this can squash opportunities, whereas getting back into the doing part of this helps us identify what the real challenges are. Inspecting the Doing, inspecting, say, recorded calls in this example, or inspecting the sales process, will help leaders see that something is repeating itself and we got to modify the process. But if you're not doing it, and this is my strongest recommendation to anyone listening that's in a leadership role, get back out there and do the work, because it's ever changing. The only reason why I stay relevant is because I always do the work right, and I think that's that. There's a couple things in there that I want to make sure we highlight. One is that idea I have my you know, I'm in the daytoday right if I'm running a team, you need to be with your team and you need to be to be listening to what they're doing. You know you if you're running a sales team and they're engaging, where else should you be? I mean, yes, there will be duties that you have that maybe in the morning I have to be at my desk to generate reports, but eventually, using sports analogies, you need to be on the sideline watching the game. You need to have a headset on listening to what's going on so that you can make adjustments on the fly. You can add to your point, which I think is a phenomenal point. We have new objections, new questions up new play. We got to go think about what a response is, train on it, then go watch and see how it's implemented. And and everyone to your point is everyone is on someone else's team. That's something that I always remind people is that I know now that I'm leading a team, I'm on someone else's team. Now that means someone above me, because I'm on their team, should be coaching and mentoring me and inspecting me on what I'm doing. That's the only way you're going to create an a successful organization with death team. It's a team is working for the championship, and the only way that that sports team wins that championship is if everyone's training harder than ever together. It isn't just one person, it's everybody on the team is training hard every day. You know, and and and the truth is is that we've have more time than we ever have and my opinion, we're selling half as many products that we did in the past. Be It making three times the amount of money, but don't let that fool you and don't let that let your guard down. You want to win the championships. Right now is when you train. You train harder than you ever trained before. Yeah, so someone the other day, demetrious Nailor, who was on a previous episode, he was talking about...

...that idea of a little bit more every day and and I done it and he took this exercise as well as challenging your team, without judgment, without judgment, to document what you actually do during your day. I mean all of you, that doesn't matter what roll you're in. Document what you do every how, and what you'll see is there are times where maybe you're not as efficient or effective, or maybe there's certain times of day that you thought you were productive and you're going that's really not my productivity time. I'm going to move that task to the beginning of my day because then I'm clear headed, I'm not as distracted, or whatever it is. But to your point, where we have more time than we ever have because of technology, if we plan our day to be more effective, to your point, then you have time to train your team if you put it on the calendar, if it's important to you, you'll find time to do it. That's a fact. And and it's not only it doesn't have to be one person's responsibility. It's a team, you know. That's why any sports team's got more than one coach. You know, they've got trainers for just about every very little thing right, right, and they work all together. They run those plays, they change those plays, they react accordingly, and that's the world we live in right now. We have to be looking for change and be willing to react very quickly and groom our team to be looking for that change and voicing those changes so we can change the place. So let me let's pivot on that, because there are people who, within any team, there are, you know, you have your high performers, you're really steady, steady folks in the middle, and then you have people at the bottom, either they're new coming in, or maybe someone's leaving. Sure, but there is this conversation that's been happening over the last year, this idea of salespeople in businesses, dealerships, where you spend a lot of your time, so do I, branding themselves, creating, you know, building my name recognition in my community as the person you should I buy your car from. Or whatever you buy or so yeah, I'm bringing myself as the expert. Now, that's not for everyone. I don't think everyone should be compelled to do that. But what are your thoughts on that? Do you think? Have you seen it be successful? Is it a distraction? Is it just something that, again, if you're going to do it, has to have a process and accountability. What are your thoughts on this idea of branding yourself in a in this case in a dealership? Yeah, you know, I like this. I think it makes a whole lot of sense. It's the reason why I want to execute a high level sales process for a customer. I want them feeling so high level about everything that I do that way they feel when they end that sale is they want to run online and they want to post that review and pop my name in it. The more reviews I have with my name in it, you know I'm going to get the calls, I'm going to get, you know, more business. I'm generating my own opportunities and anyone out there that wants to be a top performer, I think, has to find a way to separate themselves amongst the crowd at all times. No matter what you know, and a lot of that has to do with social media. You know, I've seen sales people now doing really clever, fun, creative tick tocks and to me that's forward thinking. I wish I was that forward thinking. I like to watch tick Tock, but I don't see myself recording myself doing tick tocks, although I want to and I know I should be, you know. But the truth is is that that's highly effective for branding yourself and forgetting your name out there and attracting business, especially at a time where tick tock is really still in its infancy stage. You have a huge amount of opportunity to showcase your character, you know, and...

...what's important to you and how you do things and how you make up fun and easy, which is what everybody wants, because people are threatened by the car buying process or any high stressful real estate, you know, purchase, for example. Right. But in social media is a huge thing, you know, at that's where most people are spending their extra time, and so why wouldn't you want to be there showcasing you and how you do things? And Really, again, I'm always saying this, selling is caring. It's about showcasing your character and and there's how else are you going to do that? You know, I think that's a great point. I just interviewed Steve Wrestler from he's the from drive centric and he talks a lot about video and he talks about that idea of multiple videos that they can start seeing your character, your integrity, because you can't fake it for seven videos, you can take it for one. And I agree with you. I think it's it. But but to protect the dealership? Yes, just as you would. You mentioned it doing spring cleaning, to go through your crm for any communications at going out, any scripting and messaging. This is the way we want to speak to our customers. I think there has to be a process, a style guide, brand guards, some sort of guard rails right and then measure and then watching it so that you say, okay, Jennifer is doing a good job and that's working. I think that's really important to any of you who are going down that road, either as an individual salesperson, making sure you're communicating with your dealership to say here are my ideas. Is this within the framework? Or if you're on the other side and you're empowering your team to do this, make sure that you also have a guideline so that one it helps the team move forward because they know the lane I can play in versus will. I hope this doesn't get me fired. That should never be in the mind of anybody who's promoting themselves or your dealership. Yeah, I agree and and you know there's I see so many different dealerships doing different things out there. I I think younger lead stores make it mandatory to personally brand yourself. They show them how to do it. In sales meetings they are constantly talking about how they're going to make the next video funnier. You know, it's part of their culture and it's expectations in onboarding and it's tied to their pay plan. To me, highly progressive, relevant strategies. And the other dealers that are worried about somebody saying something poorly about them, you know, a salesperson doing something inappropriate. You know, I think you can vet those people prior to them working for you, because we can all stock somebody online, right, you know, which is, in my opinion, part of the interview processes. Who are these people? You know, how do they use their social media and if it has to be discussed prior of their on boarding, then already know what you're working with. But in my opinion, I think that that's progressive, it's necessary and, frankly, glun not a lot of salespeople out there are going to do any of that. They just aren't going to take that initiative. It is high performers who do things a little outside the average high performers and they're thinking a little bit differently about how they promote themselves. They're actually thinking about promoting themselves, whereas a lot of salespeople they expect their company to bring in the business and they expect the leads to come and fall in their lap. They expect the customers to walk through that door. And if there's anything we've learned in this current state is that we can't wait for people. You know, we cannot wait for people. We haven't. Let me, let me, let me, let me, let me just push backward question on this, because I've always my...

...brain thinks two ways, meaning that this type of video communication, getting involved with your community unity. That seems the way it was years ago, meaning there, you know, salespeople or there were always out at, you know, golf outings, or they were always out at community events and whether it would. Nobody was paying attention or worried about how many hours you were in the dealership. They were worried about are you selling cars? And if you said I have to go out, Hey, I'm going to have lunch with this person, they're like, okay, great, we're somewhere along the line. It feels like we've said you can't leave the dealership. And so, in turn, have we created the salespeople with that environment to go all of I can't leave. We've just trained everybody to say handle everything that we're bringing into you know, sit on the phone and going to see him and call all these people and and then call the people back and call these orphan people or look out the window and wait for them to come. Don't worry, we'll get them to you. You know. And and I'm wondering if we've created our own monster. But now this whole video conversation is allowing them to be present in other people people's news feeds or where other people are, I should say, physically to get back to some of those old habits of I don't know the RL I yet today, but are you selling more cars at the end of the month? Yeah, you know, I hadn't really thought about that. That's true. I mean, I've been in this business for long enough where I was expect did when I was selling cars when I was eighteen, I was expected to bring in my own business. In fact, this sounds so old school, but we have gotten away from this. I used to take my business card and right I have a buyer for your car. And back in those days people would sell their cars on the street. I'm from California. They put the cars on the street and they'd have like these rows of first sales and I would just put under a window wiper, boom boom, boom, Bom Bom, and wait for the phone calls. I worked in a dealership and that's how I brought in my own business. You know, today, I I am I find myself consulting and suggesting that now we expect sales people to bring in at least one sale a month on their own prospecting efforts. But I don't think that we as I don't think as leaders and mentors, they're talking a whole lot about how a salesperson can bring in their own business. I think that's been sort of a thing of the past. Well, it's you know, some some of my clients. I had heard it and it's definitely not my saying, but I think it's relevant to this point. Is they say, you know, I sell the car, but it's up to service to hold on to that customer till they're ready to come back. I know it's my job to interact with them as a salesperson, to call them up, not just a birthday call, but to check in, see how they're doing, you know, build that relationship where I know there are some sales trainers out there that would say that after three years, four years, if you stay at one dealership and you're selling x number of cars, you know, let's say you're selling fifteen to twenty cars a month. You know you're selling close two hundred cars. That means after three year, six hundred people in your in your area what a vehicle from you are how many you're coming back or how many of those people, to your point, had such great experience to recommending to them. So do you feel comfortable calling you up to say hey, do you have anyone and refer people to you? So you are building that, but I agree with you there. There we'll talk about. How many appointments did you have all of this, but very few times do I hear anyone ask how many referrals did you get this month? How many cars did you sell off of referrals this month? As a metric that is to be measured, to be improved,...

...and I'm going to tie that back to turn over. Seventy eight percent. And when you have turnover that high and you're not nurturing employee satisfaction, that helping them with everything that we talked about here today right a bounce and that's and it gets diluted, I'm sure. I mean that's my opinion. I work in stores. I mean that's the real, real is. I don't think that that's a big focus. Well, I don't think I think it's. It's a few things there and I think you're onto something. It's one. It's we don't I taught up at Northwood University and you know, they're that the young men and women who are in the Automotive Marketing and management program that I was, you know, teaching. You know, a lot of them were, some of them are going back to their family dealership, some of them were going into the vendor community. So we're going to work at different but what that exposed them to was the breath of this industry. A lot of times people go, OH, selling cars. It was always seen as a transitory job, or I'll just go sell cars till I find something else. And I again I think deal some of the very larger dealer groups or those ones that are thinking through this, are starting to advertise the career that you could have in the dealership, not just salesperson, but if you want to go up and management, to eventually be a general manager, you could go into finance or you could go over here. That idea of if you come here, we want to hold onto you and we will nurture you. But you're right, there's so many. You're battling that thirty day sales cycle where I need everything now, very high pressure if I don't have a lot of training or God forbid, my pay plan changes. Once it was working well, now it's change, it's you're right, it's almost were career. We're wondering why we have this turnover, but we're creating an environment that causes potential turnover. And not to say that we wouldn't have it, but if we could cut it in half and hold on to people, I mean then you're building your bench, but I think without to your point earlier, without that focus of training and developing and really thinking a sports team and that we're going to we have these people on our team, we're going to hold onto them and do everything we can that if they sort of fail, yeah, it's not it's on their time, it's not us. They knew what to do. We coach, we did everything we could do. The talent or the desire just wasn't there. It's practice, I mean that's the key word that you put out there. Without practice, people don't get better without practice. You know, we can't advance and grow without practice. We can't work through some of the challenges that are ressessing the growth. You know, without practice and discussion we can't see the challenges ahead, we can't make modifications, you know, together. And so it comes with practice. It's like anything, and I think that's actually one of the easiest ways for leaders to make a sharp turn away from this sort of turnover is taking the time to practice and to your analogy with the sport, I mean any pro sports team. You don't think they have a practicing schedule and the guys like Kobe, I mean these guys came in and just outperformed everybody because they practiced harder than anybody else. Right. But to your point, they had a schedule that everybody came do. Now Kobe can stay later, which he is known, who was always known to do. But your point. The other piece to that is I always say I ask people, when people bring up the analogy of sports, I'll ask those in the dealership or other businesses I can solve for well, where are you, as the the coach of this team? Where are you when they're playing? Right, if you ask yourself when...

...you were in sports, right, what did you did you play sports in school? I did, okay. So what sport did you play? Well, I swam competitively and water polo, okay, okay, so think about that. Water Polo. Right, when you had practice, where was your coach? Right there? Okay, when you were playing games, where was your coach? Right there? Okay, never left, exactly in the mix. So where are our managers of teams? Great Point, most using that time when the game is being played, which is when I'm dealing with customers, and I always say, yes, there are times where you do need to be off the floor, but they should almost be the other managers to fill in. You know, that's why you have a whole crew. Well, that's my point. They should be trying to drag you off of the you should be like no, I can't leave, versus sure, let's go and be you know, because that's where you're they're playing the game. Yeah, but to your point, what I see more of it. They will do some practice in a morning meeting for a little bit. Yeah, and that's value bowl and that's so good. But the key is, are we transferring it out to when you're playing and and and listen, by any stretch, I love I love managers and I was managing sales teams and it's not easy. So POWs, no one out here listening. So many tasks exactly. They're getting pulled in a million different directions. Phones or I was just with a client the other day. Phones ring and we every two seconds, phones ringing, phones blowing up and I can't even have a conversation. So I get it. But the more that we can try to organize the day and even if we say, Hey, if we could accomplish twenty percent of what we have on this paper this week, that's great. Now can we get to twenty five. There's always going to be fires, but if I could spend that time even a little bit, even just one I'm walking through the floor, watching what's going on, listening what's going on, versus just making the beeline for the for the other side, I think that's we know what you've been saying. Is it that that marries that coaching to the process? So now I can tweak my team, feels that I'm their team, feels like I'm trying to help him get better. I mean, all of that works really well. Yeah, you know, it's hears making me think about so many things that I coach on with managers and I you know, I mentioned and this is a good this is a good way to sort of, you know, get focused on being in that game. One of the easiest ways to do this, and I actually do this every morning when I'm getting ready, I listen to our say, our clients recorded sales calls. It helps me. I mean I could tell you at this time, at this time in the stores, most customers are calling the store now. They are not just walking in there. They already or hip to the game and what's happening. And you know, if anything, I mean we're seeing an influx and calls because now it's three states over, you have the one they want. There's just a the sales processes on the phone now more than ever and it's an easy way to get in there and see what's happening or how people are handling right tougher scenarios of my opinion. So in the morning what I'm getting ready, I actually listen to record calls as I'm getting ready. I'm multitasking. It's easy to do and in the past management, and they may still have a little PSOR PTSD on this is, they would listen to record calls. They would have fire somebody. They get it all fired up, blood pressure through the roof and they just want to come and swinging and I'm like, you got it. That's he can't lead by fear anymore. It doesn't work for younger generation, then work for people. It's not cool. But you know, when we listen to the calls that we think about what are the strengths here and if I can identify the fact that there is a missed opportunity, it's probably because we didn't practice. It's not that person's fault per se, is that we didn't practice it hard enough, you know, and that's that's why I can come into the more, I can go into the morning meeting and if I carve out twenty minutes a day to be...

...consistent about education and and nurturing employee retention and growth. Right, this is a great opportunity. You'll get inspired. Just listen to a call every single morning. You'll be inspired about what to talk about. Well, if you're searching to your point, searching for the good, not just the bad. So that way and again, taking that responsibility, first of saying, if it's not happening, shame on me, let me go fix it. Until you know, it's a as I say, it's not a knowing know problem, it's a no, because a no like no. I don't want to do it. So let me just let's pivot a little bit, because there is something you just said and I'm so I'm always curious about my guests journeys. Right. So now people see you and you're very visible out there and everybody who talks about you and just from chatting with you now, I understand passion into commitment and you are let's go, you know, charge up the hill, run down the mountain, all of it. It's just great. But well, I'm sure people are looking at that and they could be intimidated to say I, well, I can't do that. She's special, she's a she's a Unicorn, so to speak. So roll me back to here we are, because you said in school you were competitive swimmer, you did water polo, all of that. So let's roll back to high school, Gen Ninth Grade, ten grade from that point. Now, where are the similarities? What are some of the things that they're just baked in? You always have been. But also then, what are other things that may you no longer do or you've evolved into in your journey, you know, along the way, especially as a woman in automotive and sales. Again, I it's just it. I wish we never had to talk about it this way, but it's always fascinating to me about people's journeys through this. So talk to me about that. Well, I may not have the answer you might have expected. I you know, for most of my life I enjoyed sports but I didn't see the meaning behind it. It certainly groomed me to know the equation for winning a championship. HMM, it's a lot of what we talked about today. You know, it's it's nurturing, it's practicing, it's wanting it, it's pursuing it, it's, you know, realigning, changing the plan, changing the plays, wanting it, going after it. I knew what it was like to win and I like to win. But I can tell you anything else in my life. School wise, I was never committed to I was a terrible student. I had terrible test scores. You know, when I finished school, I failed that everything. I don't even remember my scores and I think that's a real that's because I just can't admit it because they were so bad. Not a single person accepted me on the college and I applied to all the good schools thinking I was a winner. I can tell you that where I am today, after a lot of thought and a lot of work and a lot of therapy, is I am a survivor. I made some hard turns in my life because I was I was raised upper middle class. I never wanted for anything and the rug was pulled out from under me and my senior year in high school my parents split. That was chaos and I'm about to go live my life thinking I'm going to college and everything had been given to me and then it wasn't. My Mom was an alcoholic my entire life and she is a lot of the reason why I am where I am today, because she made me fight harder than I ever should have and I respect that, but it was not given to me.

So here I am, senior year. My Mom's wasted, she's not taking care of May, my dad's left, I have terrible test scores and I'm on the street. I'm about thirty days from being homeless. I don't have a car, I don't have shit and I got nobody that's got my back. Yet I've come from things and I want those things back and I get a job selling cars, and I didn't have there was, there was is no other option but the figure that out and to make it happen. And I would boil it back to you've got nothing, what are you going to do? You're on survival mode and you're going to figure it out. And once you know how to figure it out and you see that that winner is inside you and you know exactly how to get there. You know, through fighting, through getting beat down and then picking yourself back up. And you get beat down so many times I don't care if I get be down today. I laugh it off because I just know there's something new around the corner, you know, and those things change the way that you make choices and the way that you go about your life. So there was a lot in that that I threw down on you, but it wasn't something that I was groomed for. It was that I was left without a choice and it was sink or swim, do or die, and I had no other choice but to figure out the only opportunity that was given to me and to do it and to and to go hard, and that was to sell cars, and I did and I can tell you I've never left this business, because the one thing that does give back to you is opportunity. It's up to you to carve out your path, you know. Yes, it'd be great if we had mentorship and leadership showing us the way, but frankly, I didn't have that. You know, I didn't expect it either, because I didn't know any better. But I think of you find a goal and you set the path to it and you fight hard for it and you don't give up, you could achieve anything out there. Anything that is as well. That is what I love about that. First, thank you for sharing that. That that's amazing. But through all of that, I think what many of my guests have sort of echoed is exactly what you just said as well. You can't expect other people to hand you something anymore. You know, it's your parents job to a certain point to help give you things, but once you once you get out there, you need the opportunity. And the other thing is is there's always opportunity if you're willing to work, if you're willing to fight, if you're willing to you know. And that what I loved about what you said about the the the sports was you figured out the equation right, right, but but that's that's key. That that really is special, because the equation is there's a there's a process, there's there's a goal, there's has to be a desire, because if you don't have the desire, you're not going to work through the tough parts right, if you don't you know. But you're going to have somebody who's going to point you in the right direction. Now, sometimes you're going to have a coach who's going to maybe guide you a little more gently. Sometimes, again, it sounds like when you were selling cars. Are Like, here's your book, there's a car figured out yourself, but that in and of itself is they gave you the book right, you know. So there is, but it is that commitment. And to your point is maybe for some people here they don't have that. Their backs aren't completely to that wall where it's like, you know, the survive time, but you have to not survive. And I'm hoping, you know, some people don't have to be in that position. But mentally, you out there it's surviving the job or is this my career? That's what I want to do? Then it is. It's the same thing. I'm not going to be in that and I really think that's important for people to hear, because what you've done with your career is admirable.

Where you are, your respect in this industry, the the the impact you're having on people's lives. You're probably not even I will tell you that you're probably not even aware of the impact that you've had on all the people that you touch when you work. And I'm sure right now, when people hear this, they're they're going to go yeah, she's I'm like her, but I'm just out of high school. I can get to be that. So, you know, just in it. Just thank you so much for that. It's my pleasure. I mean, life is hard and the one thing that I have learned is it's not just about the prize. The prize is it feels good you you win, you got the prize, but when you learn to enjoy how you get to the prize, that process, that hunt, that's when you can really enjoy the cycle and you've got to enjoy what you do. And I'll tell leave you with this one last thought too. And and I had to make some sharp turns in my life and identify who I am, and most people selling cars that I work with, especially younger generations, do not know who they are and they are still trying to find that person. And I was. I find myself having these conversations. Frequently, find your passion, find the things you love. For me, My Love was not selling cars. It was a means, but during that process I found my passion and it drives me every day and it completes my happiness. And so when things don't go my way, they don't weigh me down, you know, and I can see how it brings me up because for me. It was about being able to help other people succeed, you know, and I knew that when I became in that role, when I got that role, to be able to coach and show somebody else the way, you know, so they wouldn't have to go through the pains I had to go through. Right. That's what I enjoy and that is what I fight for every day. Other people's success. I'm finding it along the way too, but it's about finding a passion and so you can find your true happiness. And when you find your true happiness, it just shows and people are attracted to that and they want more of that and that's what we want from our customers to you know, and I think that's what just what you said and again I hope I try to make sure we highlight things so people really remember, because there should. That's just so dense and rich with great information. was that idea of enjoying the journey, like the journeys longer than the prize. Right. So again, if you if you only are on the prize, the journeys much longer. But every day there are little wins that you can celebrate. There are going to be setbacks, but if you again focus back on the equation, focus back on like that setback is just that way doesn't work. It's not a judgment against you. It's either you, I didn't, I didn't. That effort wasn't there. Let me try the effort again, and then you can say, well, you know what, that paths block. Okay, let's not try that, let's try something else. So it's a constant idea of refinement to get to the goal. That that's that's really real. Say Yeah, yeah, yeah, well, it's playing every day with the knowledge and energy you have today, and guess what, tomorrow I'm going to have more knowledge because I learned something today. The key is not making the same mistake over and over and over again. That's silly, but it's you know, I remember reading. I can't remember again, getting older stinks with your brain, but I can't remember if it was Edison who used to say when something didn't work, he's like, well, that's one less thing that I have to try again, right, versus the list. Yeah, he's like, okay, that one doesn't work, let's try this. That one does a work. Eventually it does. Versus making a judgment against yourself and I'm sure again during your time, as you...

...joked, about their pay and just being without people. You need to be able to have people around you to help you, or else it can be daunting sometimes and it starts going away from the actions that I'm doing aren't working, to a judgment about yourself, about it's me and I'm not a good person, and we got to get out of that. Should be mentality. To know. Let's just get back to the equation, let's get back to the process, let's get to the path. And if I if I'm hitting a wall, who do I have around me that I can ask to say, am I crazy for doing this, or what do you think? To keep pushing you through, as you said, going to your coach after practice and saying can you help me? And you're doing that for a lot of people, which is, as they said, phenomenal fellas hope. So I always hope. So No, don't hope, because, see, that's the other thing is is you have to you listen. If you're not going to tell yourself, I'll tell you you are. You're having a big impact and, as they said, the impact is not just helping people sell more cars, it's that the fact that they now understand the equation. That impacts their whole life. It's probably impacting their relationship with their spouse and their family and their friends and their church right and now they're they're being present more in their lies because you're teaching them how to be present in the interaction of helping somebody with a car sale. But it is that dealing which struggle and stress and, as you're saying, mentoring them. Yeah, I think you're you're you're in your you're in the right path for yourself, because the impact you're having is you can see it. You can see it. Thank you. Thank you for saying that. It's good to hear and I know way a lot of times we're all know we have the it's okay, I just do them, my job, but you know, you do need to hear, we all need to hear from people that you know, even people that are in our circle, other people that are not in the circle, to say hey, I see you and I recognize what you're doing. And, as I said, that was one of the main reasons I wanted to have you on because I you know, I watch you from afar and I see the impact, I see what you do in the hard work that you do and the impact and everyone who talks about you did. I've never heard anyone say anything negative about you other than she's phenomenal what she does in the clients that she works with are lucky to have her work in there. Wow, thank you so much. I fight for that, you know. I want to do the right thing all the time. I want to see people succeed. I feel responsible for it when they bring me on, so I fight hard, you know. Yeah, right, that's great. So wow. So that's a good way to wrap because I will get to the wine because I think that's like I said, I'd think that ending on that one point about responsibility. You know, great leaders field take responsibility serious for themselves and for their team and their habits and their consistency and how I show up every day. That, you know, that's true leadership. That's difference and I think a manager to a leader. Manager show up to manage. Leader show up and are setting an example for others and in through their actions, inspiring them to do better. So, all right. So at the end of every episode, as we shake that off for a second here and get back to knowing other things about you, I ask a few questions, just random ones. I call them the one whatever one word or thought comes in when I ask you. These things are random, nothing to do about what we've been talking about, and so I just like to ask the fun questions. So number one, what is something that you are reading or listening to or watching that's inspiring you that you want to share with the audience? I love Tony Robbins. I was never a huge Tony robins fan in the past, but I recently got hip to him and I just love everything he says and does. and see how he fits with you, because he's every one other one. Just in case you like this one better. I Love Gary V. I have always followed him. His episodes make me feel good. They're always on...

...point. I like this guy. I like everything he says. Well, I think both of them and I agree with you. I like both of them. I listen to Tony Robins will your way way back, and and Gary be I've met him a couple times. You know, spoken at the same conferences, so we were able to chat with both New Jersey folks. So very nice, very approach. He is who he is, meaning that woode same thing, who you see here. Well, it's just he doesn't change and but it's all very re tactical and he listens. He's very present. You know, when you're talking to him, you're his focus. He's not with his phone up going to hell. What are you saying? He's right there. So I think those are really great. Good. We'll put these names in the in the show notes and things like that. Okay, next question. Traveling. I saw, I think you're traveling with your daughter's right to New York City. Oh yes, so if you, where would you place it? You haven't been to. Where would you like to go with your daughters? Anywhere? I really had my heart set on taking them to Japan this summer. MMM, I had all the all the plans, but with covid and the the change of events, it seems like may not be plausible this year. I really want to take them back because I'm half Japanese and my kids are a quarter. But it's important for me that they see heritage, yes, and at least see the differences and cultures, and I just want to give them these experiences in their life. That's all I ever focus on. Like you're not getting anything for Christmas, we're going somewhere. No, I listened that that is one place that I would love to be able to go to as well. So let's see now. Next one would be if someone described you as a or your describe yourself as a cartoon character, Superhero. WHO WOULD IT BE? Okay, for once I'm stumped. I stumped her. Yes, you know, I've never been a TV goer. That's the issue. I don't ask me about TV shows, movies, people, superheroes. I can't even them. Let me let me one. All right, then, that's that is okay. We would prove it to something else if I took all of your friends, in family, close people who know you, put them in a room and ask them to describe you with one word. What would the one word they would use to describe you? Care? I can definitely see that. Okay, last question. We've talked about a lot of things here over this past almost hour, and so if you had to say, Glenn, if there was one thing I hope the audience takes away from our conversation, what would that one thing be? Do not ever give up. It is very easy to get yourself into a circle of negativity, especially in the auto industry. It runs rampant and it is a it's just it kills opportunities for personal and professional growth. You Circle yourself around people doing better than you. That can bring you up, not bring you down, right, you know, because you are going to get be down, but you'd got to dust yourself off and get back up again, and the more positive people you have surrounding yourself in your circle, that is going to make it ten times easier to find success personally and professionally. Love that, love that, love that. Okay. Well, first of all, a piece of advice my mom gave me growing up I never forgot and I keep it and I hold it dear to my heart and I say it frequently. You are who you associate with, as my mom is...

...always saying. No, God, no, true, yeah, no, I tell my kids that is the same thing, and he and I always remember that too, and you hear that a lot till I can tell you about where you're going by the five people that you spend the most time with. You know. So see your mother was correct. All right, so listen. Thank you so much. This has been such a joy, such a pleasure chatting with you, and I know there's people who are going to want to reach out to you both I'm sure client dealers are going to listen to this and say that's who I want to help me. But there's also people who want to connect with you as well, maybe chat with you. How do they find you? Where's the best place for them to meet? Well, there's several places. You can always email me, Jennifer e, dealer solutionscom. You can always find me on social or on Linkedin and DM me. I always respond to all my DMS, unless they're ads. Those ones I probably don't respond to. It's somebody always trying to get you on Linkedin. Always they connecting as like, can I have two minutes of your time now? Yeah, I oh, I got a gun. Yeah, but no, I anyone that's looking for, you know, advice or they want to ask me about anything that has to do with anything we talked about today. For you know, hit me up on any of those channels. That's that's way to go about. will put them all in the show note so this way you can find but yes, again, thank you so much. This has been phenomenal audience. You know the drill. If you haven't yet, please subscribe to the podcast on apple or if you're an ANDROID, you they're over on spotify. You can definitely jump onto youtube to watch our conversation on the Youtube Channel. Please, if you did find value today, please share it out. I'm sure there's some folks out there that could benefit from what Jennifer shared today. It means the world to me that you're here. I know there's a lot of places that you can consume content, but the fact that you spend time with Jenner from myself means the world to me. As always, they say at the end of every episode you're in charge, but now Jennifer gave you a few more tips and tool to help you become better both personally and professionally. I look forward to seeing you on the next episode, Jennifer. Look forward to seeing you in person this year out on the trails, and thank you again so much. Appreciate it my pleasure. Thank you for having me. Take Care, Yep, me too.

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