"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 111 · 9 months ago

How to Create a Powerful Personal Brand with Christine Gritmon

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Brand is a word everyone uses but many misunderstand. What goes into a personal brand since so many individuals are promoting themselves and their products. 

How do audiences connect with you? How do you build a great relationship with your audience? What can you learn from bigger brands that could help your personal brand?

All great questions and social media and brand expert Christine Gritmon joins Glenn on this episode to discuss how she helps elevate personal brands for her clients. 

Funny, tactical and energetic. You don't want to miss this episode!!

Don't forget to subscribe and if you liked the episode please share it out

Thanks

About Christine Gritmon

Christine Gritmon empowers professionals to step into their personal brands in a bigger, bolder way on social media. You CAN do it–she’ll teach you how! 

She’s spoken on stages worldwide and is a frequent expert guest on podcasts, live streams, Twitter chats, and blog posts, as well as hosting her own weekly Twitter chat, #ChatAboutBrand, and live interview show, Let’s Talk About Brand.

Connect with Christine:

https://www.gritmon.com/connect 

About Glenn Pasch:

"Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.

Let’s Connect:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

Support for this episode comes from PCG digital. It is anywhere from difficult to impossible to manage every aspect of the changing digital landscape. Rather than trying to do it yourself, why not leave it to an award winning team of Digital Marketing Specialists who have mastered at all? Connect to your message with more potential customers with PCG digital. Go to PCG digitalcom for more information. For many companies and individuals, they look at social media as an advertising platform because it can place your message in front of thousands or potentially millions of people. And while that's great, the problem is a lot of companies and individuals are looking at social media only as an advertising platform. They forgot that social media is social, that the key to success is building or relationship with your audience. Let them understand who you are as a person, as a company, what you stand for and, more importantly, how you can solve the problem they may be facing. But if you don't connect, if you don't focus on the relationship, no one's going to listen to you because you're just going to look like everyone else. Now I know many of you are going, okay, Glenn, well, how do I do it? Well, that's why I brought Christine Gritman on the show today. She is a social media expert, but also an expert on personal branding, and she's going to share some tactical advice, some common sense approaches that, for many of us, we may have forgotten. It's about the people, it's about building the relationships and I can't wait for you to hear what she has to share with you today. So let's dive into today's episode of you're in charge conversations that spark change with Christine Gritman. Okay, okay, Christine, thank you so much for being here. I've waited to have you on for a while. been very excited about this because just following you online, I got was really attracted to your branding, which is what I want to talk to you about. Really really seem to walk your talk. So my first question to you. For the audiences, there seems to be this this idea of throwing the word brand around as this this this concept that anybody could latch on too. So when you're working with individuals or businesses about this idea of brand, what are they getting wrong and where do you start to set them on the right path? Absolutely, so different people have their own interpretations of the Word Brand. I like to say it's the version of you that lives in other people's heads, and you want a version of you to live in other people's heads. If you're in business and you can take control over what that picture looks like, in fact you should, because people will hopefully have an impression of you one way or the other no matter what. So it's good if you can make sure that that impression that they have of you is one that will also benefit you. Another thing to keep in mind is another way of looking at brand, another sciente you can put on it is who are you and why should people care? Also, why should people even remember you? Why should people even remember if they've seen you before? How can they remember if they've seen you before? Why should you stick in their heads? Why should you take up some of that valuable mental real estate of theirs? And that's really where I start with people, which is who are you and why should people care? Because we're all bombarded by so many people and things and brands and entertainment...

...and just everything trying to get our attention at all times. Social media has made this constant. Yes, and so if you really want to break through that. You need to help, you need to tell people understand instantaneously why on earth they should even care. And some of that is done because you have a really clear message of how you can help them, of what's in it for them to give that to give you their attention. And sometimes it can be as simple as being likable. All. I mean, that's actually helped me a lot in business. The fact that people actually want to deal with me, the fact that people feel better after having had an interaction with me, has helped me more than my, you know, actual skills or intelligence and the early stages, simply because you don't get a chance to show what you can do and you don't get a chance to really work with people unless they want to give you that chance. And so that's the big look. Let me ask you on that, because I I really want the audience to understand that, because what you just said well, first that's one of the reasons why I connected with you, or was attracted to to your message, as you came across approachable. Right. Number one is you. I felt just watching you or being part of your chat about brand, you know, the on twitter. It's you seemed collaborative. You didn't come across me at a conference or something, I'm the same way. Come up to me, talk to me. I'm how you would expect, right. But that's so going back to when you're trying to craft it, you know how who you are and why should anybody, and I like that, why should anybody keep you in their brain with all of the other information they have? So then, going back to that earlier question where they get it wrong, I think what I see is some people put the put their what they want to sell you ahead of themselves. Yes, for everything. Is this weird funnel Hook, and I think that also has everyone's guard up all the time about should I let this person in? Is Christine just going to be likable until she goes hot? I got you in my funnel. So is it just can you fake it? Can you really fake being like that natural, or is it really you know, you have to be that person to really attract people. You know, being likable. You can't fake that. Do you see where I'm going with this? I do. One thing I'd like to point out is that likable is definitely highly subjective. There are certainly going to be people who see me all like cram like, oh, she's too much. Oh, she's annoying. Oh, always with the red. That's so gimmicky. So I'm not going to be for everybody. I'm definitely not going to be for everybody. Similarly, there are other people who are kind of, you know, a lot more reserves, a lot more kind of and those people who think that I'm too much are going to trust that person more because something about their arrived just resonates and they sort of trust that subduedness as sort of having some degree of seriousness and professionalism involved. You see what I'm saying? So like back to you being really connected with who you are. Right, if that's who you are solidly, I'm more reserve like for me, I'm not to your point, I'm not flashy. I can get animated, but I'm not a where. I think it really goes back to what you're saying. The more you understand who you are and are true to that, then you are going to attract someone who's interested in that because it resonates...

...somehow. But but you can't fake it, no matter what it is. You can't try to put on a mask of one or the other if it's not you. Yeah, you can, and many of us do, and many of us have, especially early in our careers. A lot of times, especially when we're young, we have this idea of wanting to fit into a mold. When we're younger, it's wanting to fit into the mold that the cool kids model for us. When we're older, it's wanting to fit into a certain model of conceptions of what a professional is like and what professionalism looks like. We dull down those parts of ourselves that stand out. Standing out feels like the worst thing ever. I mean, who hasn't been in seventh grade? Right, standing out can be terrifying. Right, it can be harder to be yourself sometimes then it is to fake a persona right. But I believe, partially the older we get, partially the more we have to back us up to say that we do have value, when we do have worth, even the external stuff. I mean worth should come from within yourself, but having external backup, having their receipts, doesn't hurt, and we gather those as we live some life. Sure, and you know it does. It does come to a place where it flips and fitting a mold of who we are, not because we think it's what people want, does become more difficult and more work and more maintenance and more brain whatever. Whenever I forget something really basic and my kids make fun of me for it, I say, you have to remember like three things. I'm full and and you know, I don't know anyone who is a full on grown up who has the bandwidth to fake it. I mean I just don't care enough to fake it. So so it can actually for some people, though, getting over that hurdle and realizing that it's exhausting to fake it and realizing that it's actually harder to keep yourself under wraps then it is to just, you know, let your freak flag fly. That's actually a big hurdle for a lot of people because people we are, you know, as a society, it is kind of ingrained in us that we want to be perceived a certain way and we see all these models out there of what to be like, but literal models, right, and just roll models, all these ideas of what we should be like. Should I not be showing up on video because I'm not a size to and blond and like twenty? Of course not, because there's people who would much rather see me. But it can be hard for us to get over those hurdles of who deserves to be seen and heard and who doesn't, and the elements of ourselves that we've spent so long trying to hide and trying to sort of sand down those edges. That's exactly what we need to give free rain to in order to stand out in a way that's not going to be soul crushing. No, and I see. I think that. I think what you're saying is spot on because, and this is where I think, social media video, the advent of having a camera on our phone and documenting blessing, for sure it is. But what I like about it is I actually think consumers are trusting the rough edges, more absolute is super polished, because he's and ticktock. It's all got an intimacy and immediacy. We trust the UNPOLISHED, we trust the not overproduced, because we all know that you can fake it well. So. So then, to follow along the line you're you know you're sitting with someone in your business, you know someone hires you. Either an individual is saying, please help me...

...with my personal brand, or an organization says, please help us with our messaging. I think we have a brand once you lock it down and you say, okay, here, now you have a grasp of who you are. Yeah, what's that next step in terms of messaging or communication out, because there may be someone listening thinking, all right, I think I knew who I am. I think I have a quote unquote brand, but I don't know how to communicate it. So what would be that next step for someone to move this, move it to let's create before we fire, so to speak. Yeah, so, while I do stand by the idea that your brand needs to start with who you are and needs to start from within yourself, you can't be the result of like a focus group that you that that you like impose upon yourself. Right, the next step does need to be thinking about others and what they need and how they're thinking about what they need, because oftentimes, what we want to offer them, whether it's what we can sell or just like to help, we know that they need, it's not necessarily in the same type of language as they have in their heads and we need to understand what's in their head so that we can match it, because that's what's really going to resonate with them. So so one example will is I was just talking to somebody this morning and that's not even a fake one. I was actually talking to someone this morning and she was saying all this stuff about here. Here's what she was quoted in a study. And so was talking about what the study, you know, is putting out there and what the sponsor of this study is trying to get people to ultimately take action on. And I said, okay, but the audience for this, the people who are going to go download this study, what problem do they know that they have? She's like, well, their problem is their siloed and nobody's talking. I said, I know, but they don't know that that's their problem. What's the problem they're actually seeing? She's like, they're wondering why, you know, people aren't opening their emails and why their copy isn't converting. I'm like, that's the problem they know they have. You know why? You know the deep underlying issue is is that people aren't communicating that they're treating all these things is separate. They don't know that that's their problem. They just know they're not getting the result they want. So that's what you need to lead with in order for somebody to actually want to read further and learn more and learn what their real problem is and hopefully hire you to help them solve it. But if you're not using the same language as they are, they're not going to be able to find you, you're not going to be able to help them, you're not going to take up that valuable real estate in their brain because they'll pass you by because they'll think that your message is not for them. Well, see, see, I love that and I'm audience. Please let's let's pause on this, because I think I agree with you where a lot of folks miss. And I run an agency, so we definitely are constantly having these conversations, not just what problem do we solve, but, to your point, what questions are they asking before that? What are they struggling with? And I think where where people make mistakes is they create the persona or this perceived audience, which could be very broad. Even if you niche it down and say here's exactly my persona, we forget to do exactly what you said, and I think that's key. So, audience, make sure you take notes right there that idea of what not what problem do you want to get them too, because they they're they're going to think they don't have that problem. What's the struggle right now, water, what's keeping them up? Address that and then, through once you have them looking at you or listening to you, then leading them to maybe that next step where they say, oh, that's what's causing my...

...problem. I really, really love that and that's another reason why it's so important that we don't use social media as a broadcast tool. It needs to be a relationship tool, because you can't really understand the struggles, especially not the surface level struggles, again, to the point of the problem they think they're having. Maybe they haven't gotten down to that root cause yet. You're not going to understand their thought process, their needs, their blockages, especially unless you're speaking with people, not to people, MMM, with people social media. Originally, you know, when marketers came in and crash the party, they said this is unbelievable, this is totally free advertising and they were like, Oh my God, we have all this attention and now we have all this targeting and this is incredible. This is, you know, shooting fish in a barrel right and and of course, you know then we reached a tipping point and now brands are deprioritized, for good reason, because we're getting the way people interracting with people. But what we didn't realize, what well, I realize it, but so many people didn't realize and don't realize still, is that it's less of a an advertising tool, though it is that as well. It's a relationship building tool, yes, but if you're going to get really technical with it, it's the most impactful free market research you could ever possibly get, because you're seeing what people are saying when they're not talking to you and you're seeing what people are saying when they are talking to you. And if you put yourself in the right conversations, if you're in those right spaces, if you become a part of the audience that you're ultimately hoping to be known by. That's unfathomably powerful and it's free. So while I recommend really using social media to build relationships, not just to, you know, listen and get that market research, the fact is, if you are looking at things from a data standpoint, market research is an incredibly valuable element of social media and it's incorrect, an incredibly valuable element of having a brand, simply because you know you're developing a community around you. You can see and hear why people who Love You love you. You can see and hear why the haters, you know what they're saying negatively about you. If that's relevant, I would focus less on that. I focus more on the people who get you. But because that's going to do better in the long run. Strengthening your strengths. Follow your strengths people, follow the people who love you and find out why. And that is an incredibly valuable part of social media. That anyone who's focused on just getting their message out there and that's it and not listening back and not hearing, not listening first, even right. You know, people say social media doesn't work and then you see that they're posting basically like build as well. Yeah, that and and that's fine if you're testing right, if someone's testing to say what what connects? I want to see about this, but I think that no, I understand that. My but I to your point is if you're if you're paying attention and you're seeing what questions someone's asking you, what solutions you potentially are provide to them in those situations, you're not selling M and marketers, as they always joke, marketers get into everything and screw everything up eventually. You know, again, even clubhouse, when it first started. I popped on their almost a year ago and it was conversations, but it was also really apparent really quickly certain rooms that were just sales pitches from the top or every time every somebody, time somebody raised their hand, it was well, let me tell you what I can do for you, and it was it was...

...that bad that person at a cocktail party that you just were going, oh, please get away. But to your point, I think all of us have made the mistake with advertising on social media is that you get so caught up on the advertising, the media side, you forget the social side, which is conversations and relationships. So I think, I think that's that's spot on. So also, even when it comes to advertising, though, the Algorithm is the algorithm is the algorithm. So you're going to get a lot more bang for your buck when you ultimately advertise if you use your organic posts as market research, if you use your organic posts to see what does and doesn't do well and you want to toss money at what's doing well. You don't want to put good money after bad. You don't want to say well, this didn't hit organically, let's boost it. You want to say this did hit organically. Let's boost it, let's create an ad campaign that builds on this premise. That's what you should be doing. And you know organic social is the best possible advertising test. Right. Yeah, I and and same thing. I think it's I've played around more with copy, sometimes short, long, especially when pushing out, you know, conversations that I had with the podcast, you know, pushing episodes out. Sometimes I've just tried very simple, sometimes a little longer, just to see what connected with people are. What got response is time of day, the whole the whole nine yards. But variables. But it is always comes from a place of educating the audience or sharing with the audience versus buy from me. You know this good, there's no but nothing to buy. It's more education. But to your point, I think again for audience listening, listening to this, using your organic posting your organic content to see what you should be promoting and putting money behind. I think that's I think people do the reverse. I think they pushed money out because they think it's good idea conceptually in the board room and they just step on the gas and then later on go why didn't that work? If something's not resonating, when you don't put money behind it, it's still not going to resonate. The MOS. Put Me Right. More people will see it, I mean it does push out, so you have more opportunities, but the fact is your small sample size of the people who are seeing your post organically use that. Don't do value that right? I think that. So let's let's talk a little bit now. Let's move a little bit to that next phase of your branding. I've heard, and I agree with it, now that I am doing more of my own not just the agency work of you know, really success is, you know, contents, probably creating at the contents probably at twenty to thirty percent of the game. It's the distribution of it that really is the key of how to get it out there. So if somebody's asking you, okay, so we have some messaging, would you recommend just hitting the platform or or place where they have a bigger audience? Do they spread themselves out with you know, I we've heard the you got to be putting out twenty, thirty, forty, fifty pieces of content today to really cut through. What's your what's your take on content distribution? Interesting story from my own brand. I cut way down on the content that I was creating and just really doubled down on basically just my chat and my show. That's the content I create. It's my chat and my show, and suddenly everyone was like, you're doing so much more content, I'm seeing you all over the place, and like I'm doing so much less content. You're just seeing it because it's good. So there's definitely lesson in that, which is, you know, we all know the social...

...media algorithms mean that most people won't see most of our post, no matter how much they follow us, they just won't see our post. It's a fact of the algorithm. and rather than, you know, just pushing more and more out there, don't pay attention to what's hitting. Do More of that. Pay attention to what's not hitting, do less of that. The Algorithm is giving you clues all the time by reach and in fact your audience is giving the algorithm clues all the time by their engagement. So I would say there's a couple things when it comes to what to do to put your message out there. One of them is pay attention to what's actually getting engagement, to what's actually hitting, because that matters a lot more. You can have you know, huge number of followers, but if a very small percentage of them are engaging, that is going to actually be a bad thing. That's going to be worse than if you had a smaller audience but more of them were engaged. So that matters. Watch your ratio there. But even before that, even before you get to that stage, I know prevailing marketing industry wisdom says be where your audience is, figure out where your target demographic is spending their time online and be there. I would I mean be aware of that. You should definitely be aware of that landscape you're fitting into. But keep in mind I work with a lot of people who are, you know, they they're small businesses, they're often solo preneurs, they have limited bandwidth to work with. They can only do what they can do. So I recommend that they focus on what they don't hate. I recommend they focus on the type of content that they will actually enjoy creating, types of conversations they'll actually enjoy having, and that they should be on the platforms and be creating those content types that they'll actually do, because they will be more consistent with it, they will do it better and it's really just so much better to do fewer things really well than it is to feel like you have to spread yourself then being everywhere and doing everything. So I would say again it's for the smaller the brand it is, especially if it's one person big hm that needs to come from inside of you, the same way your personal brand does. The way you express it also needs to, on some level, come from inside of you. If someone hates writing and they're terrified at it and they think they're terrible writer, I'm not going to tell them to start a blog. If someone is absolutely petrified a video and they look like they're being held hostage every time a cameras on them, I'm not going to tell them to start live streaming right. You know, if someone has a total monotone voice, I'm not going to advise a podcast. So you know, you need to show up in the way that you're going to be comfort it and that's going to show you off the best. I like that. I like that. I like that idea of bringing it down also and focusing more on the quality, because again, unless you have a team, who's going to be their focus is cutting and pacing and creating all this great content. For most of us even for me. You know, with an agency I have, their focus needs to be on clients, right the raating revenue, and I've played around and fell into that myself of how much do I need to do more versus? I spent the last few months really tell you pushing things out and noticing what wasn't, keeping track of time when things went out, what what connected with people. To say, you know what, it's not the platform, it's the content and and it all. Sometimes will blame the platform and go all that platform. Reality is, nobody liked it. Because how that darn hour, because the content wasn't good, or it wasn't...

...it was. You default to using the distribution tools, the sprouch socials and buffers and all of these where it becomes this I'm going to just create all these things in an hour and my week is done. But to your point, that's not really building relationships with your audience, it's just talking at them, and I think we've all made those miss stakes. I know I have, and I see a lot of people doing that as well, and you just that's where it doesn't stop the thumb from scrolling to go. What is that? I also feel like anytime you are I mean there's a benefit, certainly, if you've limited bedwidth to that's creating content, to scheduling stuff out, that certainly is good, but you need to realize that that's not instead of spending time on the platform. Right, that's an advice that that's just too everything you put out there you should have the hope of it sparking engagement. Everything we put out there, you should hope that this is going to start conversations and you need to show up for those conversations. I know people who schedule stuff out left and right and they don't even know what goes up at any given time because they scaled dulled it so long ago. And then they get a comment on it and they don't see that comment for like days, if at all, and it's like no, no, no, this is what you were supposed to want, like the goal of this piece of content was to give someone something to engage with. You can't not show up for the point of the thing, right. Well, think the point of the thing is to get it out. Getting it out is when it starts, it's not when it ends. I love that. I love that. I was interviewing Brian Fanzo at one time and he had said, you know, turning on his notifications for Linkedin more than even other more than even other platforms, because he said out, you know, we may be on linkedin every day, but a lot of people are on once a week. So when they make that comment, to be there for them, because they may not come back again for another week. And I think those of us who are in the Social Media Agency world, marketing world, we think everybody's on at full time and or they're on it as much as we are. So it I agree with you being present and involved and building that relationship with your audience. That's what's going to have them want to see that next piece of content or, you know, share out a podcast episode or share out an article, that you share it out because they're seeing as someone who's in my circle of people that I like and trust. Yeah, and how? You know, I can't. If Christine sending the article out, oh well, I like her viewpoint, I'm going to read it, versus the million other people who I sort of know but I haven't built that relationship with. And I think the key through all of this so far that we've talked about relationship first before we start, just because we had the ability to push out things doesn't mean we should without thought behind it about what do I want from my audience out there? Absolutely, okay, so I want to pivot. Now that we have all of that fun stuff, let's talk about you. All right, in when I was researching and, as I said, I followed you and we've been connected now on fourth grade school picture with the lasers, yes, the blazers, all of that. So walk me through because probably, I think it's about five and a half years ago now, maybe a little longer, you left working for companies and now this is career number for that I'm on right now. Yeah, I mean I followed it through.

I was at a St Lorder. Was Way way back in a day. Yeah, so my first career in my twenties in New York City was with the cosmetic beauty industry, the corporate beauty industry. So I worked for UST a ladder, I did some work for Avon, I did some work for she sato and that was really, really cool. And the interesting part is that I always worked with the marketers, but I was never a marketer because the marketers didn't go home to late PM, so I so I wasn't ever a marketer. But I always worked in related functions and social media didn't exist, so that wasn't a thing yet. So that's crew number one. Then I had my son and I realized that being a stay at home mom was exhausting and harder but going to work. But I realized if I wanted to if I was leaving him, I wanted to care more about what I was doing. I wanted to feel more of a creative spark. So I actually had on the side, while I was still working, I had gone and done a certificate program at Parsons, the new school for design and graphic design. So career number two is I was a freelancer. I was a freelance graphic designer and writer. I hadn't intended to be a writer. I was just like, yeah, it's another thing I can do. I can put words together. I didn't realize that most people can't. So I had diminished, you know, the value of being able to write, because I was like well, can't, and everyone right, they push it like crazy in school. No, no, they cannot. So writing took off and it was a nice little freelancer them. There of you know, some design work, mostly writing work is it was, you know, fluffy stuff for local things. Then I had my second child. I had my daughter and I had to catch twenty two of I don't have enough work to pay for two kids to be in part time daycare. I had some help from my parents, but not like every day. So I don't have enough money coming in to put two kids in daycare right but in order to get more money I'd need to get more clients and I don't have time unless the kids are in daycare. So it was I was grappling. I was like, do I just stopped trying to work and just own being a stayathome mom and stop the push pull, or do I go back to full time work, which is also terrifying when you've worked for yourself? And the perfect, the most perfect thing happened, which is that my favorite client at the time, which was our local newspaper, brought me in full time, and you would think that was a continuation of career. Number two. Completely different to be in a newsroom. First of all, it made me a much, much stronger writer. When I was a freelancer, they would just take my stuff in and then just edit it afterwards, right, but when I was actually in the newsroom, I got trained on how to do it properly. My writing got so tight and so good and it was just so much better. But social media was a thing by the time I entered the newsroom, it was still relatively new to them. They were still trying to figure out how to, you know, maximize that opportunity, which was a great time because it meant that, instead of having someone who was the be all end all of here's how you do social they had someone who was, you know, fairly new at it. She was very smart, but she was she was learning along with all of us, and the fact that I had a natural affinity for it, she definitely looked me in on all of that. We'd try things, we'd see that it worked, I'd help her explain to everyone why it worked, and I also naturally gravitated towards personal branding. This was something that was fairly new to the newsroom. These professionally trained journalists had been taught to keep themselves as a nonentity, keep yourself out of the story, yes, for all those years, and then suddenly they needed to develop twitter following. So they're like, what the heck is this? I didn't have journalistic training and I just kind of took naturally to the whole personal brand on social media thing. I appeared in an ad campaign for our paper. I wound up getting promoted to a position called engagement editor where I helped other people in the...

...newsroom first of all build their personal brands online and on social media, but also build them in real life. So we do real life events. I'd find real events that were going on in our community and say, Oh, you should go to that because you work with this community and they need to know who you are and that you care. So that was really it was a really cool time that I did notice after a while people were starting to ask me to give talks on social media for lower business groups or even things that we put on for the paper. People were asking me about social media and at first I was like, but I don't know anything about social media. Just kind of do it. Why are they asking me? And then I realized, Oh, they don't know either. I know for them they do know. Plus, I started educating myself. I said, if I feel like I don't know enough, learn right. And so my personal brand, the fact that I was a known and trusted and liked entity in my community and the fact that I had all these connections in my local business community. I it, I caught the the bug. I started hanging out with local business groups through my work at the paper and I started thinking about going into business myself. I said, if people are looking at me as a social media expert, why don't I take this and actually help them? Right, and so I it was interesting. I had quit jobs before, but I had never quit a job that I was happy at before, and I was happy. But I took the leap because if I hadn't quit, if I had built it as a side hustle, it wouldn't have gotten built. So before before I quit my job, I went to a lawyer and filed the Scorp Paperwork, I did a headshot, shoot the photographer, I ordered business cards, I did all these things and I met with some perspective clients also, and I did all of that because otherwise I just wouldn't have gone for it, I wouldn't have built it. I was too comfortable to to really go for it unless I sort of took the the ground out from under my sulf right, burn all the boats and let's just get going. Yeah, so that was may of two thousand and sixteen and what I do has changed so much in that time. I started out doing social media for small local businesses, specifically restaurants, so I was literally going there, you know, taking pictures on the phone of all the food, you know, posting things, constantly, texting back and forth what's a special tonight? After less than a year of that, I realized that it was very much not scalable, not all that sustainable, and so I switched very quickly to teaching small business owners how to do their own social media better, and that was great for a while. But then last year I really started doubling down on personal branding and I'm also shifting who I work with. I'm working with professionals of various sorts, especially fellow marketers. Right, very interesting shift and one that was terrifying to make, and still it's I'm mid transition into that. But fellow marketers are who think I'm brilliant. Fellow marketers are the ones engaging with my stuff. Fellow marketers are the ones who realize the value of what I'm bringing to the table and they have trouble doing it for themselves. It's sad. I understand that. Yeah, I understand that. I understand it. So I'm helping fellow marketers clarify who they are and why people should care and putting that out in a bigger, bolder way. No, and I I love that journey and it was I'm glad you explain the engagement editor, because when I was doing my research, as like I have to ask the wedding pages, well know it was. I read it and you described it well and I thought, oh, that's that's a real the fact that the newspaper at that time, you know, saw that or you that collaboration, because it's really important, especially at that time of and for everyone listening. It...

...goes back to what you said before, relationships. It was helping the the the writers, create their brand, come out from behind the scenes, right, and I love that. You always say do your you can't be part of the story, and that's hard for them. But what you did was connected them with the community, connected them with the audience. Built the relationship in the audience is say hey, these are people you're about. Go let them know you care. I think that ties everything that we're talking about really well, because when you identify the audience, just standing behind and writing without them ever meeting you, be a video be it in real life, getting a sense of going back to what you were saying, getting a sense of who you are and that you do care. That's important and it's very easy to just still fall behind another meme, another post and with and thinking. That's how you're building a relationship of caring without interacting, answering what they're saying. I really like that. Keeping an ear to the ground is so important. The most important thing I did when I was there, when I was writing still, is I joined facebook groups for all the local communities we covered, to the ones that would let me in as an Honresident, because I realized if you really want to know a story that's going to matter to a community, listen to how they're talking amongst themselves. Right, because, yes, you know their pr you know someone has a story that they want to promote, their PR agency is going to send you a press release. Yeah, that's great. I want to hear what people are actually talking about that I can say, you know what, there's a story here and we know people will read it because they're already talking about this right, right, and I think that ties again going back to what you said about listening and seeing and understanding what questions your your audience that you're trying to connect with is are really asking, not what you perceive they're asking, or, as we had said earlier, that that I already know the problem that you're having. So here's how I solve it. But I haven't even got to that problem yet. I'm still struggling over here. So when you started the business, I think over this last year I've noticed a lot of people leaving to become the consultants or I'm going to come out and start my own business, and you mentioned a little bit of the fear of making that leap and jumping and doing it. How have you designed? Again, I'm assuming that you work at home most of the time or you've built an office in Your Huh? I had an office my first few years of business, actually an outside office, but I am a home yeah, right now, socuse you had said, I'm running upstair. So my point is, is that important for those of you who are working in your house? I mean I'm in my house right now because my office we we're we went all remote and we're just but how how is that been for you, or how important has it been for you to sort of stake out a place that you actually treat as your office, meaning that it's a respected place, versus I'm working wherever. How talk about that, because I know some people do struggle with being remote workers, whether they're doing it for themselves or for a company. How important was that for you to really build that for yourself? That's been a journey as well. When I first launched my business, I had this these ideas about external legitimacy and that's part of why I got an office. Actually. I said, you know, it's a real company has an office, and I shared an office with a couple other women I knew who were self employed and it was kind of Nice that we had that support. We could bounce things off each other. We were in related but not the same spaces, and so that was really nice. And I gave up the office because I bought a house...

...that was a block away from it and I said, okay, this is just silly, because one of the advantages of that office is that it was in, you know, thriving business hub, and I can actually see my old office from my attic window right now, and so I got rid of it. I was like, you know, that's money, we don't need to be spending. HMM. And there's this weird little room in my attic up my house is from one thousand eight hundred and ninety seven. I don't know when someone constructed this room, but it's literally just like nailed together bead board panels. It's like a shack within my attic. Very creepy room at first, but I'm a little WOOO. I put a lot of good energy into the space. Okay, so I made this my space. I liked the fact that for live streaming I could have things set up. It takes me two seconds to just turn on my lights, turn on my camera, put in my inputs. Two seconds because it's always all set up right up. But so I was working happily up here for a while. Will the only problem is it's freezing in the winter and roasting in the summer, but I do what I can. During the pin during the beginning of the pandemic, during the beginning of lockdown, when my kids were doing virtual school, I found myself needing to be a little more available. And again, I'm all the way up here in the attic right now, right. So I started doing things like working from the couch, working from my dining room table and in addition to the obvious focus issues of that, because the fact is you notice, oh I should put on the Dishwasher, oh I should do some laundry, oh, the cat threw up. You know, there's like a million, a million pulls on your attention. In addition to that, I also realized that I've just imbued this space here, this office space of mine, with so much productive energy, like it sends a message to my brain of we're going to be productive now, just like when the lights are on me. I've had times when I've just been exhausted and grumpy and just not on at all. But I guessed on a lot of stuff, as you know, and I know that once I slap the Red Lipstick on and turn on these lights, even my my brain chemistry is so trained at this point to know, all right, it's time to be on and it's able to call back to times when that was legit and I can call on that when I'm not feeling it and make it real. So I've come to really value this office space as a space that just sends a message to my whole brain and my whole body of this is what we do here, and I will admit that I did a lot of work from the dining room table today because it's cold up here right now. I had a client session, I had to prospect calls, all of that on my dining room table. But even that, I'm starting to even make my dining room table office a little more of its own thing. I have a nice ex Stan thing for my for my laptop. I have my one place, Matt that I put all my stuff on and it feels different than it did when it was haphazard. I have my my one spot there. But when I'm up here, man, when I'm up here it's just it's just magical and I get so much done when I'm in this space because it is just for this. So see and and one, I appreciate the fact that, you know, you came up into the freezing cold to do this with me. I have a space heater under my desk and I have a blanket on my lap right now. We're good. Well, there you go. Well see, that's all. It's all behind the scenes and no one needs to know that, but I appreciate that. But I did that for my you know, I did a little Webinar from my team when they all went remote and and that was one of the things I told them, is really create a space. The difference it does well, to your point, I think that that's what you said. It much better than I did. What is that? It tricks your brain into seeing something that's consistent and then saying, Oh, it's time to work. You know, my wife and I shared this room. This was her office until I was setting things up and putting things down and she just said, you know what, I'm going to go create my own space now in the guest room and she's starting her business. And so this way,...

...same thing. I can leave all of this up, but when I walk in here, it's work. You know, I can. When I come into this office and I you know, nine o'clock, whatever time I start the day, it's work, and then when I'm done, I leave. I don't hang out in here. Yeah, they're Dan at up here eitherre it, but that allows me, as you said, as soon as you walk in, your brain clicks into Oh, it's time to be productive, it's time to work. And and I wanted to talk just, you know, again as a little extra, little bonus, talking about that, because there are so many people who are moving into you know, doing a business themselves, leaving to be consultants, and I think that's one of the biggest questions I get asked. So I always ask fellow business owners, how do you where do you work? How do you set it up? I think it's incredibly valuable to that. I actually want to improve my husband's set up because he's in the laundry room. It's just open room. So our second floor hallway, where the bedrooms are, there's just this open room at the end of it. There isn't a door to it and we moved our laundry room up there. So there's the laundry stuff there and that's his office now, now that he works from home full time. That's his office and I keep telling him we need to at least put some sort of like divider between his back and the washer dryer because he's on zoom a lot. You know, I'm like we should, we should kind of define this space. Is a very small room, but we should define it a little her so it feels like, you know, this is worktime, this isn't the laundry room right now. Well, that's what we did for my wife. We bought a we got rid of the bed and we bought a sofa bed to put it there, so that way, in case the guests does stay over, we still have a place. But she got cat you know, like the wall cabinet where it has a desk in it to save space. But now she has her set up where she can go in and she does her work, versus trying to work in the same space as two people. It doesn't doesn't work, and showy says I'm messy, even though I don't think I am. I stand corrected, but she does so so that's great. So I just want to first off thank you for being here. I think some of these high took a lot of notes and all come back. Sorry, I u see me turn put my head down here because I realized take a lot of notes from the guests. Stared at the camera. Didn't even notice. selfishly, I do selfishly. I do a lot take these notes. So that's part of the podcast. I get that. It's good. It's all good. So the way we end all of our episodes and then after we done with these questions, we'll get all of where people can connect with you and audience. You should. You truly have been one of my favorite follows and people that I've followed. I mean I you were recommended by. As you said, the marketers support each other and when I said who should who should I talk to? Of course they're all. This is one of them and I love being on your chat about brand every Tuesday. It's so much fun, so valuable and gain just so many great new connections. So Bravo to that. I really really applaud that. It's really well done. So I asked a few questions here. They really don't have anything to do with anything, but first one is for the audience. Something that you're reading or listening to that's inspiring to you, that you think that you'd like to share to them and say here's a book or someone I'm following or something I'm listening to. What would it be? I will admit that is very hard for me to do right now because I'm in this push pull of there's worktime and there's family time and professional development, and Enrichmond often falls through that gap because I feel like if it's not something I'm doing to actually drive income right, I should be spending that time with my family. And well, I'm admittedly not doing a lot of reading and podcast listening and things like that as...

...much as I should be. I will say that twitter, I hate to say, Oh, I'm not reading books, I'm just on twitter, but that's the chapter of life I'm in right now. And no, but really, has been incredible for me. First of all, my own chat chat about brand. For those who don't know, it's not the Christine show. I'm learning from everyone and everyone is learning from everyone. It's not me say, coming down from on high saying this is the answer, it's me asking honest questions and hearing so many different answers and just learning so much and growing so much from that. Also, twitter chats like Metalin sclars twitter smarter. I learn a ton from but even just who I follow and the conversations that I have when I go on twitter, which I do a lot. I start with the notifications first because I want to make sure that I engage with everyone who engaged with me. I think that's incredibly important. But also some people just do that or they just look at their lists or whatever, but I really do look at my feed because I have people on my feed that I'm interested in hearing from and learning from. I should use lists more because some of them are super valuable and I want to make sure that I really do see what those people are tweeting. But follow smart people, follow good people, and and it can be incredibly informative. I'm training the Linkedin Algorithm as well to see that I don't like the trite copy pasted junk. But and I'm doing that by showing them that when something is useful, when someone's trying to have a genuine conversation, when someone's trying to get genuine enlightenment and give it to everyone who is seeing the conversation. I'm showing Linkedin with my commenting activity, that that's what I care about, and so I'm seeing more of that on Linkedin as well. So I'm trying to again, I highly recommend reading things. Do read things. Reading is fundamental and business podcasts are great. It's just my life right now. That's a I I think what you just said about how to use twitter is is inspiring and then is useful as reading any other book, because you really are connecting. And I will second that. Your chat about brand is not the Christine show. I love the way that you just lob questions out, facilitate and stay out of the way. You'll have an opinion here or there, but it isn't let me tell you how to do it, and I've sat on some of those as well as I've been on panels, and it's let me tell you how smart I am, which is we we don't need any more of that. My live stream show, which is a companion to the twitter chat, my live stream show. Let's talk about brand. I'm interviewing experts. I'm not, you know, giving a lecture on what I think right. My opinion gets in there. I'm having a two way conversation with the expert. I don't just want to show up and ask some precanned questions. It's conversation, but I bring on people who know more than I do on something I want to know more about and that my audience wants to know more about too. And so that also is a huge way that I'm growing and developing, because I'm having conversations with smart people all week long. That can help me up my game in my area of expertise, because there's always more for me to learn. That's why you're here. I'm I started this as well for that reason, so that I can have conversations with people who are way smarter than me. That's what I always say about my company as I hear higher, smart people and get out of their way and let them do what they do. Question number two. If I took your close friends and family and put them in a room and ask them to describe you in one word, what would that one word be? Fun, I think so. I would agree to mystic. I word is, I think, leadery. She means not the...

...mean Cheler to who was like a bitch to everyone in high stood many like genuinely. No, I truly think and and and the funny thing is now, chatting with you and having this conversation with you, is your exactly what I the person I thought you were going to be? Plus plus. I think there's a couple plus pluses. I would just wait till we meet in real life. Like, wait, I can't us wait. Okay, last question. Actually, I let me ask you this. I always ask guests, or I'm starting to ask guests. Okay, who would you think would be another good guest? Who's someone in your network that I should go out and chat with that my audience might like? What have been some of your most popular episodes? Oh, good Lord, let's see. Breathe. I will tell me what your audience wants. Well, that's combination. Brian Anderson was one, Brian fanzoe was one. Let's see, who else? A gentleman named Jonathan Goldhill, who was a succession planner for business. Also, you know, some of my clients are in the automotive field. So when I've interviewed some of the people in that field specifically, you know who people recognize or know. So it's a blood ring rate. So you know, it's a great source. I find is relevant industry events. Look at who the speakers are, because when you mentioned Brie and Brian and myself, I'm like, we all just spoke in August at Social Media Week Lima. That you talk to Jessica Phillips. If you haven't, Oh yeah, Justin Yeah, yeah, but you could kind of look at her whole Social Media Week Lima lineup. Thanks. Will just go there wet friends with pretty much everyone who spoke. So if you need a connection, let her your friends with a lot of people, it'd say. So okay. So we've talked about a lot of things. So my final question to you is if there was one thing out of everything we talked about today, one thing that you wanted the audience to take away from this conversation? What would that one thing be? Stop hiding. You're so much cooler than you think you are, oh my God. And if the world has not sent you that message, it's because the wrong people have been on the receiver it. The right people will think you're freaking awesome. So find them and they can't find you unless you just rock it down be yourself. That I love that. I think that is fantastic advice. I appreciate that. Well, Christine, this has been phenomenal really, so much great information. I can't wait to go back and listen and can't wait for my team to listen to this as well. I think you provided so much great tactical value as well. So how can people connect with you and find you online? I know it's sort of simple, but I always like to ask. Yeah, I am really easy to find. I'm the only Christine Gripman there is. It's great grit, like when something's Gritty, likes and and Mon like Monday, and so Christine Griptman, Google, ma'am, everywhere. I would say gripmancom connect is a very good place to go because it gives you buttons to follow me on all the things on twitter, on Linkedin, facebook, instagram, wherever. So it gives you the buttons to follow me, but it also has a button to fill out a form so I can follow you and I can connect with you and give you that support as well. So gripmancom connect and we will put that all into the show notes again. So thank you so much, Christina. Has Been An absolute pleasure. Love chatting with you audience. You know the drill at the end of every episode. Please make sure you follow the episode, go follow Christine. She will be worth the the the follow. That one little click is going to bring you a lot of value. So please...

...make sure you do that. Make sure chat about brand every Tuesday. A lot of fun, a lot of great learning, so don't miss that as well. To add about brand Tuesday's noon eastern time, and then let's talk about brand. Is the live stream show Friday's new eastern and that is simulcast on facebook, twitter, Linkedin and Youtube, and we will link all of that in the show notes so you know where to find that as well. So don't forget to subscribe to the podcast on apple or if you're an android user, go over there, click it as well. You can also go over to Youtube and watch the full episode. Please make sure that you remember to subscribe, but also, if you liked what Christine and I had to say today, please make sure you share it out with your networks as well. I'm sure there's someone who could benefit from this information. I really appreciate your attention. I know there's a lot of places you can go watch content, but the fact that you spend time with Christine and me means the world. As I say at the end of every episode, you're in charge, but now Christine gave you a lot of great information and tools to help you become more successful, both professionally and personally. I look forward to seeing you on the next episode, Christine. I cannot wait to meet you in person. Thank you again so much. Have a great holiday. Thanks you to all right, take care.

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