"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 3 · 1 year ago

Five Things a Manager Should MUST do in the First 30 Days

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode Glenn Pasch shares the 5 questions that need to be asked of supervisors & team members in the first 30 days.  

We discuss other key leadership skills and strategies that need to be focused on. How you can impact your team and set the groundwork for a successful run as a new manager Following these business tips will help set the team off on the right path for future success. 

About Glenn Pasch:

"Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.

Let’s Connect:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

So you just got the job and you're wondering what should I be doing, what should I be focusing on in my first thirty days? Well, I'm going to share it in this video. Hi and welcome back to another episode of you're in charge now what? I'm your host, Glenn Pash, and the goal of this channel is that help those of you that find yourself in charge of a team, a division, a project or even a business, build the skills necessary to lead high performing teams. Each week I'm going to focus on one topic. I'm going to share some tips and strategies that have helped me build my business and I think it's going to help you generate consistent results from your team. So let's dive into today's episode, and the topic of today is going to be those first thirty days. This should be around our third or fourth episode and we've talked already about the key trait that a new manager should have or possess, in my opinion, and that's that coach's mentality. It's not about you, it's about your team as you now assume that role to lead. We also talked about the advantages and disadvantages of coming in from the outside. You know, hired in from outside the company or being promoted from within, meaning I was part of this team and now I'm leading it. What are some of the challenges I'm going to face? So the big focus for me, for any new employee that I hire for my company or when I started out running teams or being hired in to run a new position, was the first thirty days. You know, we three thousand sixty ninety days, but to me thirty days. I look back and anytime I was very successful at what I was doing, those first thirty days were really important. I got out, sort of get out of the gates in a really good way. When where I struggled or if it just took me...

...longer to get where I needed to get, it was because I didn't follow the process, I took it for granted or I my ego made me think, well, they're hiring me in, I must be special and I got away from what worked, following my path right. I've said this and I'll say it multiple times, is I've been successful a lot of times, but I've also failed a lot of times, and usually my failures are not from sometimes it's from not knowing what you should do, but a lot of times it's not doing what I know I should be doing. So that's something again, a little tip, a little tool for the toolboxes. If you have a pattern, if you have a structure that works, keep following the structure. The minute you take it for granted, you're cutting corners and you're probably not going to be as efficient or effective as you should be running this team. So let's get into the the the details. What should you be focusing on in those first dirty days? So, as I said, do you in the video about coming in from the outside, the the your advantages. You don't know what's going on. So your tool at that time was asking questions. So I want to refine that tool and say, okay, Glenn, I'm asking questions, and you said you know, ask what and how questions. But who should I be asking the questions to? Great Question. So there's two sets of people that you need to make sure that you sit down with and ask questions in those first dirty days. It's the supervisor that you report to, not the person who hired you. It may be the same person. Who Do you report to? Whose Team are you now on? So remember that. We we talked about that. Yes, you run a team you're responsible, but as a leader. Now that means you're on someone else's team. There could be a group of other team leaders, but you're on their team. So that person, whoever I report to, Whoever's...

...team arm on. That's one person I need to have conversations with. The other group is my team. Now you may think that's billy or odd. Why would I want to ask questions of my team? Well, it's important for you to get off on the right foot with that team and there's certain questions you should be asking. So before I tell you what questions you should be asking, you might want to ask me. When should I be doing this? How soon should I be doing this? Well, in my opinion, I would be having these conversations with the supervisor and the team no later than ten days of starting there. I've done it a few different ways. Both have been successful. If I was taking over a team that I was promoted from within, I probably had I already knew some of the team. I was aware of some of what I'd be asking them. I really needed clarification from my supervisor so I could ask that sooner. If I'm coming in from the outside or when I've come in from the outside. It took me a little longer to get a sense of what's going on. I spent more time asking, working with the team before I went to the supervisor, so I had more concrete questions, specific questions, to ask the supervisor. So which either way. But I wouldn't let it go more than ten days, you know, lesson two weeks, I guess, because I don't want it to I don't want to put so much time into those first thirty days only to find that I've gone off on the wrong path, where the supervisor expected me to be year and I ended up over here. So let's talk about supervisor first. What questions should I be asking my supervisor? Well, this again breaks down into two parts. First part is about you as an individual. Second part is about operations, how the team runs, expectations there. So what question should you be asking about yourself? Well, the first one,...

...and I know it seems a very odd question, but I think it's very useful. The question is why did I get the job? It's a very, as they said, very odd question to ask a supervisor what, but I think it's important to understand what that supervisor or the people who hired me. What did they see in my interview? What did they see in my experience that stood out where they said that's the right person? I need to understand that. Why? Because if my experience previously, they're expecting me to bring in maybe, you know, if I hire somebody in front to run let's say paper, Click or social media for my agency, maybe the fact that they ran social media for certain types of clients, which now we want to go into that industry. That's important. That should be communicated. The reason why was because you have experience and that industry and we want to go there. So if I didn't communicate that or if you didn't ask me and you just came in and started working, you're missing an opportunity to again bring value to the company, to stand out in the supervisor of mind. So you're asking that question. It's really important to do that. The other thing that I would ask is about your your as as a person leading this team. Is, what are the expectations? Time frame? It ties a little bit into operations, but it's about you, meaning how long do I have in terms of generating results? If I was promoted from within, maybe I know the answer, but I still want to ask the question. Maybe I realize that the previous manager was let go for underperforming. Maybe I realize that the manager was promoted because they were doing a great job. So understanding that runway, so to speak, of how long do I have if the...

...team's underperforming? How quickly do I have to get a turnaround? Completely different strategy. If I have ninety days or a hundred and twenty days to show a fifteen percent increase versus thirty days. I need to understand that if I don't ask that question thirty days out, that supervisors looking for those results and I still think I have time. So again asking what the expectations are and when do I have to deliver them. The other question I would ask is about the previous manager. The don't be afraid to ask your supervisor what happened, meaning what did they do or not do? Again, it's not about feelings, it's not about we don't want to get into personal questions. It's actions. Actions drive results. So I if the the previous manager was successful, what did they do to generate the results? They may the supervisor may say, well, they were very consistent, they had morning meetings. They what I loved about that previous manager is they were always coaching and developing, or they always came to the table with new ideas, or they you know, we're always here before. Their team was right. I want to mimic that behavior because that was important to the supervisor. Same thing if they say, well, here's the reason why they weren't successful. They came in late, they stopped doing training, they stopped working with their team, they were never prepared for the meeting. See, those are things that I need to know that that was that stood out to the supervisor as a negative and I don't want to do that. So those are the type of questions. And then, lastly, the question I would would make sure I ask is what authority do I have over my team in regards to either changing processes, is hiring, firing, pay plans? You do I have? Do I have authority over that team to do that? Now, be careful, little sidetip.

Be careful or don't. Wouldn't say be careful. Don't get upset. That's a better way to say it. Don't get upset if your supervisor says, well, you have authority by but I want you to run everything by me. I do that with my team. I don't care how experience they are when they come and they work for me myself or whoever is overseeing the team or my right hand. Will we make sure everything runs through this? I'm hoping that over time they're doing everything I need. The meetings when I'm checking in with them, everything's going according to schedule, so then I can loose in that, you know, check in policy, or I just say okay, you have it. Now it's your team go. So don't get upset, no matter how experienced you are, if your supervisor asked you to run everything. They just want to make sure that you understand how the company works. You could have experienced somewhere else, but it has to work for this company here. The other part of that having authority over your team if your team interacts with other teams, meaning that if your customer service to sales or marketing to sales, or sales to marketing, you know, does anyone have authority where they can come and take my employees and have them work on other projects for their team without running through me? Right again, you have to understand how the hierarchy works. What you don't want to have is if one of your team members is not doing something that you're expecting them to do and they said well, well, Glenn pulled me on to this other project and you go will glen never came to me to ask me and you have to have that conversation making sure you understand all that hierarchy. So those are questions I would be asking my supervisor now operationally, again goes into what are the expectations? If you don't understand the Daytoday, what is the daytoday? How often do you and I meet? How often do we get training, meaning me? How? How? What's the training structure down below? Can...

I change it? Right? Understanding all the INS and out. It's really important understand that operational status. One of the keys of again, the operational status is understanding what that supervisor expects from you. So questions again. How often are we going to meet to review the team's performance? Maybe it's weekly. What Day of the week? What time? What do I need to bring? Do you want to report? If you want to report, what's involved in it? What's specifically do you want in what format? The more that you can get that type of information you can then better provide the specific feedback. If you don't ask that question, you could generate a beautiful thirty page powerpoint report and on the supervisor, all I want is high level wins and losses. On the flip side, if you give me a high level wins and losses and I wanted to understand the details, notice there's a disconnect. The key for this the tool for your tool box asking these questions. I will tell you if you sat in front of me as a new employee or a new supervisor of a team that works for me, you're heading up a department, and you sat in front of me and ask me these questions within a week to ten days of me hiring you, I would be incredibly impressed because you're taking ownership, you're taking control of the team your you're thinking of all the different sort of tentacles of where your team impacts or what impacts your team, and you take responsibility so you're armed with the right information to go out and spend those first thirty days getting things laid out implemented so that we can drive towards success. So that's your tool. That's the key and the reason why you ask your supervisor these questions. Now what are we asking...

...our team? Again, coming in from the outside, it might be more of the what in the how because I need to understand the day to day processes from an internal standpoint. Right my supervisor can tell me what's supposed to be happening. I need to get rolled up my sleeves and get in here and figure out what's really happening through watching and asking the right questions. So I'm on the fence about this. I've asked this question and it's work sometimes. I've asked this question and it doesn't work sometimes, and that's why I sort of go I'm on the fence. Asking about the previous manager. I've asked questions about the previous manager and when it's worked. Is asking about what they did, their actions. I'm not about I don't want to get into how somebody felt about them, because that gets into emotions, emotions, emotions or can be really cloud everyone's judgment. But I want to know is if they were successful. What did that manager do for you that made the team successful? Or, on the flip side, can you tell me how how, how the manager interacted with you? What did they do? What did their schedule look like? You might uncover things that maybe we're working previously and the manager just stopped doing them. Well, we used to have daily meetings and then they stopped. In the beginning the manager worked with US each once a week or once every other day, and then it went to once every two weeks and then I can't remember the last time that someone worked with me. So again you start to understand the structure and maybe what they actually liked your team. I like getting that feedback. I liked having those morning meetings. You start keying into what the team found beneficial. The key big question that you need to ask each of these members of your team is how do they learn? One thing about that. How do they learn? The reason...

...is everybody learns a little differently. In a future episode we're going to talk about the four different communication styles. I personally me I work or learn better by watching and trying to do versus reading a manual. If I have to read a very technical manual, it's painful for me. I'd rather go to Youtube, type in, show me a video, let me watch. I go find someone who does it and says, can you show me? I learned by watching someone and then I can mimic it and I can figure out. It speeds it up for me. On the flip side, there's other people that you. They like the manual. They like doing it that way. They say, just give me a list of what you want me to do, I'll figure it out. I'll come and ask any questions. So by knowing how your team learns, that's going to put you in a better position to know that. This person I have to demonstrate for and explain where maybe we create a video and let them watch the video before we do the train. This person would rather have a report or a manual. So I have to give them either a website or the manual and say here's what we're going to do, it's all written out. Please study this and we'll talk about it. Understanding that's going to make you a better coach. The other key piece to that is when they want to be coached. There are some people that like to have coaching or those types of conversations first thing in the morning. Get it out of the way so I can get onto my work day. Other people would rather get on with their work day and say I don't want to be disturbed, I'd rather do this after three o'clock. Or could we do this at four o'clock before we leave, or after lunch? Is Better for me. Again, I would rather train someone or give feedback or have meetings with people when it's convenient for them they're ready for this, versus me imposing it just because it works for me. Remember what we said, once you're in a leader ship position, it's not about you, it's about them. So if you can really focus ninety percent of your schedule that,...

...if it fits for the team, that's great. They're always going to be times where you have to do something at a certain time because your supervisor needs it, and so I have to have this meeting now with you because my supervisor needs this different conversation. But if you can limit that and open it up to your team and ask them when they want to be coached and developed, I think it'll help you along those ways. So those are sort of so let's summarize again. Well, we're asking our team questions, right, we asked we're asking them feedback about the previous manager, but we're asking them what and how. What did they like that the manager did, what was important to them? What maybe drifted away, because, again, if it's important to them or they liked that, we could get it back on track pretty quickly. We also want to ask them how they learn and when they would like to be trained. That's important for them. Now, of my supervisor. We want to talk about again ourselves what stood out for me in the interview process, why I got the job. I want to know that. So if that's important to them and that experience is important to them, I want to double down early on, in the first thirty days, so that I recognize that. The other is the time frame. How quickly do I need to generate the results? Also, the authority I have over my team. Do I make these decisions or not? Same thing, don't get remembered, don't get upset if, for a certain period of time, everything has to run through your supervisor. They're just making sure you understand how it fits into the business. They're not discounting your experience. So I hope that was valuable to you. If it was valuable, please click the subscribe button. It would mean a lot to me. This way you can be notified when we post new videos. We're posting them right now every Tuesday, seven o'clock in the morning. We will be adding more videos in, also with some interviews, because my take with this channel is I want to give you my take on this. The first thirty days but then I'm going to...

...be interviewing some industry experts on their experience leading teams. What what did they want from someone in the first thirty days or what did they do in their first thirty days? So again you get different viewpoints, more tools for your toolbox. As always, use the comment section. Let me know what you like, what you don't like. If there's a situation you want me to comment on, give you some advice, I'll be more and happy to maybe you'll end up being a future video as well. So please share this out with your network. I know there's a lot of people out there running teams who are figuring it out on their own and this could be valuable to them. My goal with this channel is to be your coach, to help you lead better teams. So, as always, as I end every single episode, you're in charge, but now you have a new tool to help you be more successful. So thank you so much for your attention and have a great day.

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