"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 115 · 9 months ago

Changing the Mindset of Your New Team with Dimitrius Naylor

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The first 30 days of taking over a new team is crucial. Whether you are new to leading teams or an experienced manager, understanding that how your team thinks is key to success.

But how do you change the mindset of your team as a new leader? There are a few keys and tactics that work.

In this episode, Dimitrius Naylor, Marine, leader and now General Manager of a new auto dealership shares his view of why mindset is the key to getting a team working in unison. He shares how his experience in the military impacts his leadership style.

We also talk about diversity in automotive. Dimitrius shares his experience and hope that we can move to a time where you are only judged on effort and results.

Passionate, thoughtful and powerful. Great conversation.

Don't forget to subscribe and please share!!

Enjoy 

About Dimitrius Naylor:  

Former United States Marine corp veteran having deployed numerous times around the world. 

Follower of Jesus Christ, Married to my beautiful Stephanie in which we have three children between us. I entered into the automotive industry in 2009 and have worked my up the ladder having sat in all seats on the variable side of the business. 

My life’s work is summed up into my favorite phrase! “ hardwork is the great equalizer!”

Connect with Dimitrius on Linkedin: https://bit.ly/3yjql1S

About Glenn Pasch:

"Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.

Let’s Connect:

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

Support for this episode comes from PCG digital. It is anywhere from difficult to impossible to manage every aspect of the changing digital landscape. Rather than trying to do it yourself, why not leave it to an award winning team of Digital Marketing Specialists who have mastered at all connect to your message with more potential customers with PCG digital. Go to PCG digitalcom for more information. Let's say you're a new manager and you're taking over a new team or business, or maybe a new company. You're the new general manager of this automotive dealership in the case of our guests today, and so I wondered, what do you do in those first thirty to sixty days? Do you focus on the metrics to drive productivity, or you focusing on your people, or is it a combination of both? So today's guests to meet Yourius Nailor, who, I said, is a general manager who took over this new automotive dealership. His philosophy is a little different. He says he spends that first thirty, two and sixty days focusing on mindset of his team as well as the metrics. But, as he said, my people are my best are a lie and the more that I can invest in them early, in those first thirty to sixty days. Well, the process, the productivity, the efficiency in the result. They take care of themselves. Loved it. It's a little different take than most people would think, but I'm excited for you to meet him today. We touch on a few other aspects of his journey, from being a marine to being homeless, to moving into the car business and now being a general manager, as well as dealing with diversity in his journey as an African American man. We talked about that later in the episode as well. Very exciting. He is truly one of the most grounded, open, honest people I've ever met. I'm really excited for you to meet him. So let's dive into today's episode of You'R in charge conversations that sparked change with demetrious nailor. All right, so, Demetrius, thanks so much for being here and being part of the show today. One of the reasons why I wanted to bring you on. You know, we've gotten to know each other maybe over this last year. We've met a few times in person, but what's fascinating to me is one you embrace challenges, you take on challenges in your latest challenge is moving to a new dealership as a general manager, from West Virginia to Texas. Pretty big jump and there's a lot of people out there who were taking on new projects and leading new teams and taking on new initiatives and they struggle with trying to figure out what should I do? How do I plan out those first thirty sixty days to get to know my team, see what's going on, how to make changes? So for you, from the tactical standpoint, what is your strategy? Explain to me what you do. When you took on this new role, how did you prepare yourself and first thirty days, what were some of the main things that you focused on to ingratiate yourself with the team, understand what's going on and start on your vision towards where you wanted to lead the team? First, when thanks for having me on, one of the first things that I do with the team was to pray. We prayed and then we got to work. A lot of people have this like vacillation between do they want to kick the door in, as we talked about, or do they want to take time to get to know the team, figure out the inner workings figure out where they can make...

...pivotal changes. I'm a fifty guy. I work on mindset and operations at the exact same time. Whenever I get brought into a situation, I never look at it as it's a failing situation. And again, this situation that I was brought into here, it's not a failing situation. They needed to turn the dial just a little bit and I I was excited to do that, but at the same time I didn't want to go in and change everything. Alex has a great process here at Bravo, but there are some tweaks and things that I know that work that I've worked with for years. So first it was mindset, the belief that more is possible, because you get to a certain plateau and then you're like, all right, this is it, we've reached the Mecca, we're good. But my belief is that every day there's just a little bit more. So I always work on minds. At the first thirty days is nothing but motivational videos, teaching them that more is possible, how to get to more and pushing from more, and that's all we work on for the first thirty days. What I'm doing there is. I'm testing and watching and evaluating through the pushing. I don't like to come in and just like observe. I'm not an observer, I'm a doer. So I like to come in, but I don't want to like break people to the point of like, Oh my God, I can't deal with this guy, got to go. So I've really try and focus on that mindset so they expand their belief of what's possible and then we start strategically working on operations. All right, we need to do more of this, we need to do more of that, and once we start doing that, people will naturally either, as I always say, you're either on the island or you're off the island. People will naturally vote themselves off the island because they realize like wow, this guy requires a lot. He gives a lot, but he requires a lot. So natural, naturally people of ravitate off the album. But then there's some people that are naturally kind of come together in Gel and that's how I that's how I operate. Like if if anybody ever gets a chance to look at my facebook on some of the posts that we've done my previous teams are like, Oh, you're doing that with them too, and I'm like, it doesn't change. I think the right change on how you take over a team, get them bought in and then get them moving all in the same direction. The MODEL doesn't change. So so there's a few things to unpack there, and I really like what you're talking about, because I have seen that where a new person comes in and they assume it's all bad. That's the reason why I'm here. I'll put on my Superman Cape, I'm ready to go and I flip the table over and all of this where I agree with you. I don't think I will say most situations that you're going into not everything's broken. Your job is to investigate. So let me back up before you get there. What do you think if, if I'm a new manager and I'm going to take over a new team, what are a few things I should look at or conversations I should have with the people bringing me in before I get there, meaning how do I understand get a sense of what's going on before I get there so when I land I can start knowing what I'm looking for. So give me a few things. I should be asked. Skame few things I did was before I did anything before. When I accepted the offer, I said, okay, I just did background research. I looked up, I went to the face I went to the website and I pulled all the names of the salespeople from the dealership. And we're just going to front of the House. So I put all the salespeople's names and then I strategically went on each one of their facebooks and just what looked at how they are, how they interacted with the company versus their personal life. I look at that and I looked at some of the things that I saw and I said, okay, that's interesting. You know, me just kind of making like mental notes. So then I...

...kind of got a small picture of like who these people were. Right, young, smart, intelligent, love to have a good time, love going out, very family oriented over here. So that way, when I go in, already know what kind of motivates people. If I see a bunch of pictures of somebody's family on there and I see like hey, we we did this and this is on a Wednesday and of that went says their day off and they like to spend time with their family. So I'm doing a lot of very strategic I'm doing a lot of very strategic work in the background before I get on the ground. I'm also making sure that I understand what motivates them through that strategic work. Then from there I'm I'm having a zoom call with all the leaders, every leader, so I can start like figuring out like hey, what are some of the things that they'd like to see better? I'm not asking for problems, I'm just looking at like, Hey, where do you think that we could get better? What are we missing here? And that gives me an introduction to say like tells them a little bit about who I am, what do I stand for, what I'm bringing to the table and effectively know that I'm not there to fire anybody. That's the first message I was but I'm not there to fire anybody. I'm there to come into the fold and serve. So when I put that message out, so everybody kind of takes a deep breath because naturally, naturally an automotive, everybody thinks that you're going to come in and you're just going to sweep the table clean, bringing your own guys. Everybody else is going to be going. So I kind of lower the levels of the stress immediately by having that conversation. Look, I'm here to serve you, I'm here to help make the team as good as I can make it, and I'm just going to tweak a few things. That doesn't mean I'm going to fire anybody, that doesn't mean that that I'm going to change a whole bunch of things. But again, I'm okay with the fact that a lot of people are not going to make this ride because I do require a lot and that sets the tone well, what I love about and for the audience. I hope you grabbed what Demitrius was saying, because when I asked You the question, my brain went to both things. One is the people, but the numbers, the performance, the expectations of where do the people who are bringing me in see as the issues? And you only went to the people, and I think that's a really great lesson for everyone who's listening. Understanding your people, doing that due diligence, especially now that we can with social media, to get a sense of who they are. What do they motivate? Are They married or not? Do they have kids? What are their passions, and then extending your hand to leadership to say what do you think? Right, as they always say, seek first, as it was. Stephen Cubby says, seek first to understand, then be understood. So by asking them first, you're breaking down the barrier instead of you coming in and saying, Hey, the only reason I'm here is because you all failed, which brings that up. So I thought it was really fascinating about the people. So talk about then numbers. Is it when you're having those conversations, when you're talking with people before you know, before we're talking pre showing up to start, is it really important for you to understand what the expectations are of ownership or leadership who are bringing you in, and also your time frame for when they're expecting results or what success looks like for them? Is that really important as well? Yes, so performances. Let's taste bacco. So the reason why I focus so much on the people because the people are the biggest are a lie. HMM. Understand what motivates the people and you understand how to get the most out of your people. The performance will then take care of itself. Naturally. The conversation between me, Alex and everybody else was basically the...

...potential of the store is here. We're operating at a level that's here. We need you to come in and bring the operational tempo of we need you to bring your skill set and affectually, affect, effectively change the numbers by this number. He didn't give me a certain date. But again, we also know that this is a performance space business. So every day we're trying to effectively change the dial by ten, five, ten percent. So we're turning that dial by five and ten percent every single day and if we're not, then we're evaluating, looking at it and saying, Hey, we're not meeting this metric. Yes, we would like to be at three hundred fifty cars withinside of six months, but we also want to have a model. We had this conversation to we want to have a sustainable model. We don't want to see the Ekg we want to see more of a slow graph of just continued success. So the big thing with having that conversation is both sides setting those expectations, my ability and my talent level, saying hey, I know that I can do that it. But we've got to be smart about it because we don't want it to be a flash in the PAN. On the other side of that Alex saying Hey, look, I get that, but I also want to be here by this drop fedne. I'm okay with that, and I like goals and I like quotas, and that is just having a good conversation about what the possibility is, what the actual metrics are, and then how to move those metrics, because it's it's okay to have those. I want to have these lofty goals of three hundred, four hundred, five, hundred, six hundred cars, but how do we get there and where are you at? That's the conversation that had to happen and that's the conversation that did happen. Like we're here. We're effectively missing the ball here. These are the things that I see from my view. I want you on the ground to do x, Y and Z, to move these numbers, and we feel like that's how you can help us great so. So those of you who are not in the automotive space and a lot of the audience, Alex is Alex Florez. He is the owner, managing partner of the dealership who brought in Demetriu. So that way you have a friend of reference when he says, Alex, what I again? What what I love about this, and I am so in sync with your approach. It's it. I firmly believe in this approach, which is understanding where we want to go. But you said it sustainable model. There are many people who could come in and and, through their own sheer will and effort, affect change in the short term. We all could increase sales more, but is that profitable? More importantly, is that sustainable? Right we I equated to weight loss. You could lose twenty pounds very quickly, but is that a lifestyle that you can maintain long term, or are you going to gain thirty back because it's too exhausting and you're burnt out? The other piece that I thought was very important for all of you listening, those of you in positions who are taking what Demetrius is saying and saying how do I apply this? Is it's reverse engineering and breaking down these goals. What are we doing today so that we're moving forward? But the key was you're measuring it or looking at our actions or a results every single day to make sure that we are doing what we need to do or accomplishing everything, or else we're looking too far down the road and we're stumbling over things in the short term it's is that something? And the reason I'm going to ask that as I can't find it in front of me, but I've been rereading Colin Powell's book on leadership...

...from military and he talks about that. In military you're constantly evaluated. Every day you're evaluated and and and focused and checked and probed and you know. So that's the way one day build teams and, more importantly, that's how they build their bench and discover the next round of leaders. Is that something that will has always been innately and you to break it down, or was that something as a being someone a marine in the military? That's where that came from. The constant evaluation does come from the work or the constant like pursuit of like greatness, that constant pursuit of life. There's a little bit more that comes from the military. Every day I'll I'll walk up to the staff and I'll say I need just and they'll go a little bit more. But those things are from the Marine Corps. Those things are from the military. Constantly questioning and asking, can you get just a little bit more out of this person? Can you do just a little bit more? Can You affectual effectively shave down that time. You know I mean on this exercise. So, like one of the things that we always do is will do shoot houses, and what we're doing is we're trying to clear this house in a fraction of the time, because violence of action, not actual violence, which is violence of action. How fast we got it, how fast we got through the door, how fast we broke that corner with speed, accuracy in detail is a is the best and most effective way to win in a close quarters combat situation. Right. So I look at the same thing when I'm measuring every single day, like our performance. I'm measuring like, did we get to that lead fast enough? Did we respond to that client quick enough? Did we provide the best level of customer service? We did this, this was good, but could we have done something just a little bit better? And if you're always asking yourself that, like can I do it just a little bit better? Can I do it just a little bit more? Can I can I sweeten the deal just a little bit? Like, if you're always asking yourself, you're always going to be pushing yourself. It's I think it's the problem when you start saying, like we're killing it, we're doing a great job, this is the this is the best they've ever done it, and then you start falling into that and that's what happens to a lot of leaders. I've worked at a lot of different organizations, where they come in, they'd make the immediate change, they have a flash in the PAN and then they go we're here, we arrived, we're good right in the mill, but in the military we train every single day to get better, and the reason why we train is because we know that there's every day just a little bit more. So that's where I get that from. No, and I think that's one. It's admirable because I agree with you a lot of people don't do that, that idea of consistency every single day, having that idea of of always asking yourself or the team asking themselves, what can we do better? Also, for all of you listening, that idea of time. We as leaders coming in and taking over a project or a new team, we think there's this big gap of time, some mystery hour or half an hour that everyone's just lounging around and you think, if I can only find that, we could our productivity could increase, when in reality it's a series of one minute here three minutes here, two minutes here, could I get to the customer this much quicker? Do if I train myself? Do I need to go to Demetrius and get an answer? But now I know the answer myself. That three minutes is saved. And so if you're constantly looking at ways to improve our actions and train on them so we're...

...more confident, confidence, build speed and efficiency, then, as you said, your business starts flowing because the whatever piece of your business it just you finish a little quicker with that, which means I can do more in my day versus there's all these gaps of wasted time and I love that conversation. So let me ask you. When you talk to people about that, you brought that idea into them. Maybe they were already thinking about that. But when you're going to them a little bit more and you're talking about mode of Vasition with people and, you know, showing them videos and helping them to learn their craft and feel more confident, what are some of the pushbacks that you receive or reasons that people are saying? Either they can't or this idea of well, this is the way we always did this. How do you overcome those types of barriers to get into their heads to put them on the right path. So I don't love the word motivation because it's so temporary, it's so fleeting. I like the idea of I'm going to inspire you to have a different thought or approach the thought a different way. So if your first inclination is every time that their problem arrives, you say I can't or this is just not a possibility, I want you to pause and say I can and it, it is possible, and you're like HMM. So we work on that for thirty days. So rather than them coming to me being the problem reporter, we say this a lot on clubhouse. I I don't want the problem report, I want the problem solver. I'd rather you come to me like Hey, what have you done to try and figure this out first, before we built down the rabbit of me dropping on the hammer and saying, boom, it shall be done. Right. So I start getting them to expand the thought of problem solving, like how do we solve the problem? If we have if you were on the other side of this problem, what would you want to see be done? So when you think about it from that Lens, that is when you start really being like, okay, that's not a problem, I just need to attacker from this angle. We're exactly okay, becomes more of a problem. And I agree with you on the motivation. I don't like that word. I don't believe anyone can motivate anyone. You can inspire people to do things. The only person you can motivate is yourself. So I'm with you on that one. But to that point, what it sounds like you're doing is saying to people if if you're considering this a problem or I don't know what to do, it could be an information problem, meaning maybe you don't know, but if you don't give up and you ask yourself, well, what do I think we could do? And to your point, if I came to you and said, Hey, Demetrius, I have this issue, if you gave me the answer, well, that doesn't help me. But if your first inkling, which it sounds like you're telling people, this is the way you approach it, is well, Glen, what do you think we should do? Or I come up to you and I say, Demetrius, I've been thinking through this and I'm stuck. I got this issue a solution and be solution and I can talk of myself into either one of these and I'm not sure like that's working through a situation. Versus to your point, why just give up? I can't. There's there's a dichotomy, you know, me and Jaco talked about this in this book, the dichotomy between in powering your people in taking too much power from your people. So if your people really need to run to you for every solution and every problem, they then become powerless. Right. So they become powerless, they forget how to respond in the face of...

...adversity. They had that angry client. This goes across any business. You you have that angry client that shows up in front of your face because you don't know how to skillfully work through the problem. M You upset the customer even more because then they're like, well, why did I even waste time talking to you? I should have just talked to the guy who can make the decision. But black drained you and I've empowered you with the capability to say like, okay, this is what happened last time, this is how we got through it. Then you're not coming to me. You're just going to come tell me, hey, this is what happened. This is how I fixed it. Is that. Okay, are we good to go? You know, mean customers happy? I'm just going to go. Hey, great job, you know. I mean keep keep rocking. But for most people and most leaders they stopped and they say, well, you should have talked to me and you should have asked my opinion first. I want my people to be so skilled and so powerful and so strong that I become the guy that just walks by. Is like just checking, like the check box, because they know how to handle the problems. A lot of where customer service gets fumbled is because we have too many, we haven't too many touch points. I mean, if we take back to automotive, it's no different than when a client comes in and they want to buy a car and they've got to talk to seventeen different people in order to buy the car, but in point one they said they want to buy the car. You weren't listening because you're not skilled. You haven't been trained to listen and then solve problems. And I tell this, I tell myself guys that all the time. Number one thing about selling anything is solving a problem. Right people are coming to you for a solution if I train you how to give solutions rather than train you how to ask more questions, then you become more effective. Wow, see, I love that and I again we always talked about these little nuggets and things that you should be writing down. But that idea of sales, and we talked about it in our episode with Ryan Dowdy. She always talked about that. The key to sales is solving someone's problem. So first asking questions, understand what the problem is and then solving it. But to your point, empowering those people to handle the situation takes work, takes training, takes takes ego. Your Ego has to be put on the shelf because, to your point, a lot of failures. We've probably all had managers in our days who we work with, who are so holding on to that power, that title, out of fear that if I trained to meet your's how to do this, then they're going to fire me, when in reality they're only way that I can do more, to elevate my career, to go on and do more things is someone has to be able to do what I do and train. Try to train those people. But I love that is that you're empowering people to say you you have the power to solve this problem. If you need help, that's a different conversation, but you have the power to do that. Do you see in your career? Can you see examples or, without naming names, give me examples where you ran across people that were on both sides that either helped move your career along because they empowered you, or other ones that held you back because and talk about what they did so that if someone was listening to this and you said, well, here's three things that they did to help me and here's three things that hindered me, that that behavior, someone may sit there and go who I'm doing that? That might be a negative. So I've had both leaders. I've had leaders that empowered me and said, Hey, look, we're going to train you, we're going to teach you almost to the point of where you're going to replace me, because you're going to be so involved and so empowered, but you're going to be skilled at you're going to be knowledgeable. I've had those leaders where they they took the time to really help me understand the why, like why are you asking me to do this? And I think that is one of the things that I was able to take from the...

...military and turn it on the Ted, because of military is instant willingness and obedience to orders without question, down or reason. Right. Well, when you spend that on its head, I want the same instant willingness and obedience to orders, but I want people to understand why I'm asking them to do a task. And I've had leaders at say go park this call on the other side of a lot, don't ask me any question, just go do it. Well, okay, well, how did what am I doing this for? Are you doing? Am I doing this just to please you at the very moment, or my doing this because it serves an actual purpose? And I think people will follow you and do the things that are tough, in the things that they may not necessarily want to do, because they understand the why behind it. And I've had both leaders. I've had leaders that went to me and said, Demetrius, I need you to have this done by this amount of time and and I'm like, well, I'm I've got these other ten things I've got to do. Can you help me understand why this now needs to take priority? Now because I won't do it, but because I need to. I need to put my my ducts in a row. That wacking, I can make sure that every task gets fixed. Well, when I can understand the why behind it, I then start moving pieces around and getting things done in the timely orders. That way I can finish your task but still finish my work. So if you look at that from like a business saying, if it Glenn walks in and says, Hey, I need to have this audit of their website done by this time. Will Glen, you give me four other things to do, why is this one? Well, because if, if Glenn is just because I said so, like, and then you have this like, you have this slow the depreciation of Glen's value right, or the other part to that is, and this is also a very good point. You just made me think about this as someone who's giving that directive. A lot of times someone would they won't even say by this time. They'll just come in and say, Hey, Demetrius, I need this done because it popped into my mind as a leader, and I'm not taking into consideration what's on your you know your plate, but if you had to. Your point is if you built a culture where I could push back and ask you, Hey, glen, will when do you need this by it could be as long as you get to me by the you know, end of the day, tomorrow. That's cool. Now you're going. Okay, I can put it in now. If someone says, Hey, I really need this now because I have a meeting with so and so, then you can say, all right, I understand why and I can maneuver my things around. or I could ask I said, well, now I have two things that are do at the same time. What? Don't worry about it, I'll talk to so right that's collaboration. So it's really important as a leader to give that time frame, and that why? Because it'll one you respect the other person's time and their workload and it allows them to collaborate. Because if you don't need it right away, say that, or else they're going to interpret just because you're the leader it needs I have to drop everything. Yes, and then it also when you help people understand the why and the reason behind it's not because you, and please don't, I don't want people better listening to take this to the extreme. This isn't every single situation. You don't need to tell why I need you to put the bottom over there, because you know me. If it explode, just going to blow us all the pieces, like there's a time in a place for everything. But when I'm talking about the why and how most situations, the reason why I'm doing it is because I want to give people the chance to rise to the occasion. HMM. I want to give people like in the military, they're like, we need you to go do this training exercise and it needs to be done in this amount of time. Most top operators in the military trying to get it done efficiently, effectively in that amount of time because they want to be seen as the guy they want to they...

...want to rise to that level occasion where I want to everybody is that way. Everybody wants to please the boss, but everybody wants to really at their cored and know why, how and the time frame, so that way they can say, even if it's at the last second, there like boss, I got it done right, and we give people that. It allowed it imposer hours them, it trains them, it teaches them, but it also in bold in sense of reach just a little bit more. This is just the psychology of me saying, like, I really understand people and I understand people are our best capital. I think Erica tiphany or one of those guys said that some point people are best or why there are best capital. How do I just get them to turn their dial up just a little bit more? The numbers and everything, if you have a great process, will fix themselves. But if I can get the people to operate at a high level, my number is my metrics, everything will rise. So that's really show with that, because I think people struggle with that of how to break it down for someone right, how to take someone who is performing. So in automotive you're selling ten, ten vehicles a month. You and your mind look at them, look at their workload and you're thinking they could definitely be doing double that. They could. But if I said that to them, their brain goes I've been struggling to do ten. Your want me to do twenty. You want me to do fifteen, sixteen, you're crazy. But if you can and and everyone listening and breaking it down to incremental to say every day, if you could make do you think you could make three more phone calls? Do you think you could? You break down into almost produce it to such a right reduce it down to such a small level that they almost laugh at you. You know, I used an example when I was working with a client and we were talking about reputation and saying could you get reviews, and I said, Hey, the whole team. There was twelve people. I said, do you think you we could get one a day from all of you, not each of you, just one is a group, and they all laughed. They thought it was hysterical. They said share. I said, well, do you realize then you'd have twenty, five or thirty at the end of the month. I said, but if you got to you'd be here. And all of a sudden they all wanted to please and get it without feeling Oh my God, because if I said to all of them you all have to get one now they're pushing back and fighting. So, as you said, if I can break this down on a daily basis to something that seems almost insignificant, where they go yeah, sure, I can do that. That compound interest of all of a sudden, every day I'm adding on, adding on, a little bit, a little bit, a little bit. They look completely different three months down the road with their performance and and it. That's where that momentum comes from that you're talking about. Of of breaking it down guiding them, coaching them, looking at it every single day and knowing what's working whatnot, versus let's just wind it up, give them something and then go look at it at the end of the month. One of the actually got this from you. We talking. You said I want you to write everything down that you do throughout the day, break it down an hour by hour, and I said I require all of my sales people that make fifty phone calls, had ten live context and two appointments every day. That's a minimum standards. We call that the minimal standard. Right. So I said, man, there's so many people that have not hit this. What am I do? Like, maybe I need to tell them that it's more about the ten love contacts and the two appointments then it is the fifty phone calls. And I said no, because if they make more phone calls effectively, that the contact will come up and the appointments will come up. I said write it down. So what I did before five days straight, I said every hour we're going to journal and I...

...put all these white pieces of paper on the glass. I said we're going to journal every hour what you're what you did for that hour. We're not going to have somebody come around, I'm just going to get on the MIC and I'm to say, Hey, our check in. They all run up and they write what they did on that board. So then I said okay, and then people started saying, okay, I did this, I had this and that, went to lunch, and I said, just be honest. It doesn't matter what it is. Just be honest with yourself what you did for that complete hour and it write it up on the board. It's not unlike a punishment. This is this is just me trying to fare out what you do with your day. And what we found is that people are at on average in ourselves are only working about four and a half to five hours a day. They're here for eight hours. MMM. I said most people are trying to get all their phone calls done right after the morning meeting or they're trying to get them done right before they go home. So then the very next week I said this is what we're going to do. You need to make fifty phone goals. I want you to try and knock out fifteen phone calls an hour for eight hours. And they said, Oh, we can definitely hit fifty. Well, simple, Matt tells you that's a hundred and twenty phone calls, but in their head they're only worried about that one hour gap of efficiency. Right. So I reduced it down to the ridiculous and I said, Hey, look, if you only get the five to ten phone calls an hour, that's fine, but this gives you something our by our day by day to the track. And then we start looking at okay, now, I know, hey, look, within this three hours, this was not a great time to make a phone call. Right. This four hours gave us the best our lives. So when do we need to we need to scale up our phone calls. We need to either move it to twenty to twenty two phone calls per hour within this slot, or we need to spread it out between this four hours. So we started doing that. And then we look at the metrics. I have them here every day. I look at the metrics every day and I say, Hey, look, how many phone calls did you make this week? How many appointments did you said this week? Then we can start saying okay with these. Now we can start dialing in. Okay, you really do really well at this time. What are you doing during this time? Right? You know I mean and then we start really fine tuning. That's how we have been elevate every one person to their maximum standard. Where a US, we're not just running around saying like Hey, do this, do this, do this. Now they understand the why of the fifty phone calls, they understand the how to get there and then they understand, all right, boom, I've got to get to this level because you know I mean this is the standard and I want to please the boss. You work all three of those things together and that's how you get it seem moving forward. Well, what I again that idea of breaking down their day. Left to their own devices, they're going to do what they think is right. But by boxing it in, and we've talked about this, where once they start understanding what their day is and you asking them to meet yourious what's on your plan today and you say I have to do x, Y and Z. Anytime I check in, I'm checking in on your plan, not my plan. If it's my plan, you'll fight me, but if it's your plan and to your point, it's that idea. If I don't talk to you all day and you follow this plan, we should be successful that that should be a good day. But what I really like, and everyone who's listening again understand what he said here, is that you start with the framework, then you start generating different behaviors based on results. Make the phone calls great. When tracking, then what what we really are looking for his conversations. So when did we have the conversations? What was the best time to call? It could be different days, right. So then you start looking at it to we're very quick to write these blanket statements. Of all, every time I will call it between this time in this time. Well, maybe Monday, it's better to call in the morning than at night or afternoon or that. Now you start strategically building up a better structure for them, a better game plan...

...for them that makes them more efficient. Versus what you're just I can just check the box that we made some phone calls and then scratch our head. Why didn't that work? So I really like that way of adjusting behaviors based on data. We I believe in firmly pointing the Arrow and then pulling back as hard as possible. We work hard, we work really hard, but at the end of the day, when my people are feel I want them to feel embolden, but at the same time, I want them to feel like ever responsibility to that goal, and I mean that's why we work on the mindset, because I want them to feel like I always say I can, I will, I must, and then we tie it to something emotional. I have so many videos on it and I got that from eaty to hiphop preacher, but it really hits home for me because, like for me, one of the biggest motivations is reaching my personal goals and the things that I've had to do to get towards, to read some of my goals in life, and I want them to have the same kind of understanding of how to reach but attack measure and then strategically move towards their goals. So that's that's a lot of why we do the way we do it. It's I'm going to mention a lot of people say, as a general manager, you shouldn't be doing that and that's way too granular, and I'm just like, at the end of the day, though, I want to be able to the sign of a great leader is to be able to walk away, come back and nothing has changed. Right. That is what I'm looking for. So a lot of people are a lot of people give me grief about that, but I really want people to be bought into the idea of their own success and what that looks like. Right. But again, the people who give you grief, you know, may not be sick as successful. I think I read a quote that said people will people who judge you and say that doesn't work are usually not successful. Right. The people who you know, your people who are more successful or you are never going to judge you for the those type of actions. They understand it and they applaud it and say yes, because that's the way you work to create your environment. Now we, you and I, are aligned, but let's there could be someone else who says, yeah, I understand that, but my system works. It's having a system and being consistent with the system and monitoring your system, whatever it is. That's really the key, and I really love that idea of tweaking and ingesting so that people are empowered to follow the process, believe in the process. You've put in a position to be successful and, more importantly, they don't need you to be there. They want you to be there because having Demetrius, they're just boy. That just it makes it even better. But I don't need you to do my job. That is the sign of folks. If you take anything away from this, that, to me, is such a great point. Demetrius is building his team so that they don't need him to be successful. They will be successful. They want him there, but they don't need them. That's that's huge. That's huge. So let me pivot one thing here now, because we've talked a little bit. We talked a little bit about the military and things like that, and and you and I talked about this earlier and you had just mentioned something and it triggered in my head when you were saying, you know, I have my goals and sometimes I've struggled or been putting positions that are struggling to achieve goals. One of the things you and I talked about that I was interested in is, you know, I think the face of automotive in business is changing, especially from you're seeing more diversity in the workplace, from race to Male, female, gender to just a lot of different opportunities now for people in this industry. So for you over your career coming into automotive and...

...over the years from leaving the military, where I you know from my understanding I did not serve, but military it's not that it's color blind, but it's just hey, just get the job done. But for you, how important is diversity to you in building a team? Do you for your career to be an example of someone who is successful, or are you at a point where that's not as important for you? I just want people on my team that can win. I we go back to me getting the offer to become a general manager, probably in a lot of people's mind, a little sooner than probably it should have. You know I mean. I I've moved multiple times, but it was all strategically aligned to get to it, to an end goal, not chasing a title right, but chasing a place of the highest greatest impact. I look at diversity in the workplace as my right, my duty of my responsibility. I I'm not trying to sway the pendulum one way or the other. I just want to make sure it's fair down the line for everybody. And I say this a lot on club house. I say that we have a right and responsibility that once we reach a certain plato or a certain place in our lives, that we have to send that ladder back down. Right. I moved from Jack's North Carolina, starting in the car business, where I wasn't allowed to get promoted or move up in the ranks based on sometimes because of the color of my skin, because they didn't want to change the way the front office loved M I I personally have fought and tried to be the best that I could be. So that way, none of that ever played a role or a factor in but again, this is so this is still a conversation in two thousand and twenty one, going into twenty two. Yes, we have to recognize our ignorance in this part of the business, in this part of the world, where it's it's that miss number, that thing that's I'm spoken. But again, a lot of people ask me like, well, why did you? Because I wanted to give that opportunity to the gentleman or the lady that looked like me that wasn't given an opportunity. And do I purposely go out of my way to swing the pencil and to say like, I don't care what it is they're getting in an opportunity over this person. No, but I make sure that the playing field is absolutely leveled every time I go into a situation where I can and I make sure that I also coach and talk to people about it as much as possible, because I do know what that's like to not be given an opportunity because of the color of my skin or because I didn't look the quote unquote same as other people right for one reason or another. So Do I feel still think it happens? Yes, so I happen to work for a great organization now that's owned by two minorities and that are giving opportunity. I we were in our training class yesterday. It was nice to look around the room. We have a GSM that's female, Hispanics, we have African Americans called Kate. I mean the whole room was the melting pot of whatever should look like. And I think too many times, because we get comfortable in seeing what we're used to seeing. So that kind of like inadvertently like alienates a certain group, because if we're all used to seeing the Glens...

...of the world or the De matrices of the world and we're friends with those people and we naturally just kind of don't pull for those people. Right. My thing is, I look at it like this. I pulled for the most talented, the most qualified, but I've have an opportunity to steward or bring in some person of color or a minority or specially especially a female. I pull them in, you know, mean with the right qualifications, but I make sure that I take that opportunity to give back right I because position, you know. mean do I alienate one racer over the other? Absolutely not, but I make sure that I'd take the extra time to give it a credible second look. Or I'm a voice in that room and an advocate for that person that can't speak. So I think that's kind of where I'm at with it in regards to diversity. Am I standing on the Front Lines Holding a picket sign? No, but at the end of the day, I'm I still trying to champion it from my position every day and every chance. I get a hundred percent now and and I that that is one thing that, you know, I admire about you. When I met you, there wasn't any it just it's the way you carry yourself and it's, you know, it is that ability to look at another person and to say, you know, I want to be judged on my results. I wanted to be judged on my personality, who I am as a man or a woman, not on all of this other things, and you're right, it's still sad that we're having this conversation in two thousand and twenty one or two thousand and twenty two, and some days it's worse and some days it's better. But I think for all of us in leadership positions it is really about understanding the skill set that you need for your team and then going out and finding the best people and doing your best. Now, as you said, you know if you have two candidates and hire them both if you can, and though. But really we keep talking about this, this idea, and there are movements and there's ideas, but you know, we're all hoping for the day where it isn't about that. It's not saying, Oh, it's a minority owner, it's just an owner. And as so it's a woman GSM, it's like, no, she's the GSM right. So for me and my company it's not a conscious thought, but I did the math at one time. Someone asked me, and I think I'm going to say outside of my brother and I, all of the leadership positions are women. Was it conscious? Know, they were the best people. They stepped up right, and so we're hoping that, and I think your example of that, of the way you carry yourself and the way you talk about it and what you're doing that is inspiring to other people that you have the opportunity and you're they're reaching your hand back, and I think that's a really great analogy. Reach back for the people behind you, drop the ladder down, pull them up with you. I think that that that's phenomenal. So so talk about that. That that conversation you have with some of the people on your team who may be thinking I'll never get that. Like what what are those conversations like for people who may not think, well, you're you're looking at you and saying, well, you're the exception versus, I could never get there. My thought process there is, again, I look at I want to be seen. A lot of people say, Oh, I'm coloring, but I want to be seen. I want you to see me in all of my my African American beauty. I don't I want to be seen, but at the same time I don't want that to be the focus of our conversation. I don't want it to be. You mean there's so many ISMs and Ladism,...

...racism, you know, I mean all the different islms that are out there saying things, and you know, put that like so pointedly. She said there's so many ISMs that we can't even talk through these days. My thing is I just want everybody to have a seat at the table and have a voice that from there, let your actions and your talent and your hard work. Then the the platinum, be the playing field. Right when it comes to people on my team, I make sure that when we're hiring, I mean we don't necessarily have this problem here because of we're such a diverse area, but right when, when I was in West Virginia and they would be like, oh the major should you know? I mean you hired everybody and anybody. Yes, because I believe at the core principle everybody deserves a shot. When they do with that shot is up to them. Everybody says, oh, Dmitri's you're the exception, you're this or your that. What I look at it and I say is I just made the most of that one opportunity that somebody gave me and I just took off and ran with it. HMM. My Ob is to now show that people show people, minorities, women and anybody that wants a real shot. This is what you do with it. This is how you Stewart it and this is how you make it expand, and that is the conversation that I have with people that are looking to excel or that don't believe they can do it. That's the whole reason why I start with mindset rather than metrics and performance, because I want you to think that, regardless of what you look like, it is all possible. Right, prove that it is all possible. Now my saying I'm the best that's ever done it. No, but I am saying that everybody deserves a fair shot, a fair and intentional shot, on on getting to the top. And I have the top, far from it, but I'm going to make sure that everybody around me has that fair opportunity, as long as they're willing to work harder. Hard work is a great evils. Yes, and and to your point, I mean when I was thinking about asking questions, you know, and interviewing you, I was going, I don't, I don't want this to be a topic because of what you just said. Oh, we're only having this conversation because I'm African American. It is no, but it's more of the way you carry yourself and the passion that you have for helping others and to say I'm not unique. I'm unique in the fact you're looking at me as I'm unique, but I've busted my ass to get here. You know, that's the key. So if you want to bust your ass, and and and I think it was now I'm going to go blank on HMM. She she was. She's the CEO of three to one ignition and I'm sorry she's going to yell at me for Fordetty Your Day, but she came from Russia and she said you just don't take for granted all the opportunities that you have here. Right. She was saying in Russia you're born rich or you're born poor and you can't change that. There is no middle class, you know. But here, if you're willing to work hard, there's always an opportunity. And there's so many people, for whatever reason, who take their opportunities for granted or think they should be given something because of who they know, where they went to school, of their rick, whatever. It's nauseating. I talked to my children all the time about that. I said nobody cares. The only thing they're going to care about is how hard you work and are you will and if you're willing to work hard, you'll be successful. But just because you're my son doesn't nobody cares. I can get you in the door, but after that you got to do it yourself and it's that hard work and that's why I wanted that conversation and talk to you about how you're elevating your team, because there are so many people that look up to you. But it's that idea of looking up at you and awe of Oh, he's the Unicorn, instead of no, this was hard work and you all could do it. I I live...

...back and I think about the time that I was home as I came out of the Marine Corps and made some made some poor decisions as far as like proper power planning prevents poor performance, is what we always say in the military. But I made some poor I made some poor decisions on being able to have the kind of have the preparedness to do things like I have a military. So when I got out of a military I was homeless for a year and a half. So left in my car and a lot of people would have laid down and drugs and got addicted the alcohol and woe is me. I kept working because I always was under the mindset that more was possible. That's where I get to look just a little bit more. But at the same time they were like, when I look at it, my life is just multiple instances of just working hard and never giving up. And I want to show those people that want to automatically associate the ISMM's with hard work and I want to tell them that, like, Hey, look, at the end of the day, I'm not the Unicorn, I'm not the exception, I'm just a guy who said, in the face of it all, I'm just going to work hard, I don't care what happens, I'm going to be so good that they can't ignore me. And that's all it was. And do I look at him say there were some times that I wasn't given a shot or an opportunity? Yes, and can I man, I could always bang that drum like, Oh man, it's so hard out here. But what I instead said was I'm going to be so good or I'm going to go and grow, like that was my mentality, like I've reached this level here and they refused to see the hard work and the talent. So then I need to make a transition. I need to move. That's that's all there was to it, and I refuse to let anybody hold me back for race, religion, for any of those things, because I was always a hard worker. You could not like me for the color of my skin, but one thing you couldn't deny was the fact that I was going to make you a lot of money or I was going to generate you the kind of attraction that you needed to make a lot of money. So again, it just boiled down to hard work. And I don't want to dismiss the race portion of it, but I also don't want that to be the focus and just like I don't allow for my staff to focus on that. But at the same time, we're going to make sure that everybody gets a shot, regardless race, religion, creed. I had all walks of life work for me and I'm never going to hold them back. I'm going to empower them, teach them, grow them, cultivate them, mold them, but I'm going to require that they they work hard, because that is the great equal, as a hard work is the greeting wiser. So that's where I'm in on that, though, and that that is that is just awesome. I mean I got goosebumps. I mean just because I so understand that that is the way that you know, I was raised like hard work doesn't matter, and that is the only always, the thing in my back pocket I always had was I know how to work hard. So as long as I know how to work hard, I don't really care what I'm doing, what situation I'm in. Because very similar I was living in New York City. I was broke, like broke broke, not like, oh, that mean no, go to happy hour with a dollar and have a beer and eat their food. Broke, because but I knew I was willing to work hard, so it didn't matter, like I'll work all day, just give me whatever, and eventually you work your way out of those situations. So I think that's such a great way to sort of wrap this up. Is, you know, you want success, you want that, find people who can guide you, but the end of the day, nothing's given to you.

It's it's you have to work, because we all could look at people in our lives that were given things, that took it for granted and wasted it and ended up with nothing. You know, it's all comes down to working and that's what you want people to know you for, is your work, ethic, your talent, not all the other things that wrap around it. So so so that's awesome. So at the end of everything, what we do here is we ask if you just random questions to wrap up, and then we'll get everyone to be able to connect with you. So I ask basically three questions and I call them the one, meaning one one answer. What pops to your head? No, most super thinking too long. What's a book or something you listen to or watched right now that is inspired you that you would recommend to the audience? The one book would be the DICOTOMY and leadership by DRACO will it. It's it fits my style right, if it's my style. Talks to me about the military aspect, but it also molds and folds in the business aspect of it and there's so many lessons in there and unbeknownst to me, like I didn't realize how many lessons from the military I was taking into business, HMM, and how they work so well hand to hand that you don't even think about it. It's so second nature. So what reading that book? It really expose some of the thoughts that I have as far as business, but how they're so strategically aligned with tactics and military missions and I'm just like wow, it's an amazing look. So that would be that would be the first thing a coops of my head. Great, great, great, yeah, I tell you, I was lucky enough to see him speak with leaf Babbot at one time and spoke to them afterwards. But he's an enormous individual, by the way, the nicest individual. But Ho, you want him on your side, not against you. But you're right the whole idea of military as I said, I was rereading Colin Powell and just his philosophy of how things run into military and how they build their bench and how they look for people. I was going that's the way I believe I make so, so much sense. So I think that's great and well, we'll put that in the show notes for people. We try to keep all the books that our guests recommend and we're going to do an end of the year list of books for people. Okay, if I took all your friends, your wife, your family, close people who know you, put them in a room and said described Demetrius in one word, what do you think that one word they would say relentless. HMM, okay, I think that would be a good one too. And lastly, we talked about a lot of different things today and and I so appreciate you, one your passion and your willingness to share, but your your heart is just so a parent and your openness and willingness to put yourself out there. It is admirable. I am so glad that we have connected and and and sort of become connected in our lives because I think you are truly one of those people out there that really walks their talk and can make a huge impact in this world. So I'm looking forward to that. But, based on everything that we talked about, if you had to say when this is the one thing I hope that the audience takes away from this to one thing. What's the one thing you want them to walk away with? The one thing that I want them to walk away with is, I said of multiple times that are hard. Work is a great equalizer. I've spent countless days and nights...

...just going to work and just realizing that everything that I do means nothing if I don't show up. But I don't show up in life, at work, in my marriage with my with who I believe to be my creator, is if I don't show up in all those areas and work hard in all of those areas, nothing changes. No impact, no greatness, no, no fanfare, no, no great job by faithful son, no, no, I love you. From my wife. If I don't work hard in every aspect, like hard less, why? I wasn't kidding. Hard work is the great equalizer it. You have to work hard in your marriage. They have had trouble and I've had trouble and I've had had to really focus on intentionally being there for my marriage. I've had troubles and struggles and work life, but every time that I worked hard I was able to get through it. Every time that I felt like I was drifting away from my faith, I worked hard and read the Bible and prayed to God and did those things in I felt myself drawn here. Every aspect of your life is just a series of hard word lessons and hard work and lessons, one after another after another, and it is how you compound those to be able to work hard and smart and at the end of the day, when all else fails the chips are down, got a bed on yourself and just work your asshole and I love that. That is man. That that is just got me going and I'm sure everybody else. So again, to meet yours. Thank you so much for taking time today. I hope all the audience hope you got a lot out of this. I know I did. And and you know, this is a gentleman that I really think you should be connected with. So to meet yours. Tell the audience how can they connect with you? We're on social media. Can they find you? So, where's the best place to go? Anywhere. I'm on everything. I'm on Snapchat, I'm on Instagram, I'm on Facebook, I'm going to tick Tock. They can reach out to me on clubhouse and and everywhere, and I use my right word name. Just meetrious nailer at gmailcom. It'll pull up all of my social media accounts and I respond to everything. So feel free. I'm here to serve. If you ever meet anything or if I can be of an assistant. Say Anybody, just de metrious nailer at gmailcom. And I say listen, audience, this is someone that you should connect with. Very powerful, very grounded and very caring. So again, so, audience, you know the drill. Please make sure you subscribe to the podcast on Apple Or, if you're an android user, on spotify, you can jump over to youtube to watch demetrioucy his great beard game, see how handsome he is and enjoy watching it as well. Please make sure, if you found value today, that you share out this episode. I'm sure there's a lot of people you know that could benefit from what Demetrius was talking about. I appreciate your attention. I know there's a lot of places for you to consume content with the fact that you spend time with Demetrius and myself means the world to make and, as I say at the end of every episode, you're in charge. But now to Meetrius gave you a few more tools to help you become that are both personally and professionally. I look forward to seeing you on the next episode to Metrius. Thank you again, my friend. I appreciate a look forward to seeing you soon. Thank you, sir.

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