"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch
"You're In Charge" with Glenn Pasch

Episode 99 · 1 month ago

Content Marketing That Matters to Your Audience with Brian Fanzo

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Content marketing often is taken for granted. The assumption is anyone can do it or even more frustrating is the content you are marketing is not well thought out.  

In this episode, Brian Fanzo joins Glenn Pasch to discuss what brands should be focusing on with their content marketing strategy. What message, what story should they tell , what platforms should they be using. This can be daunting but 

Brian Fanzo who has created his own footprint online as well as consults for Fortune 500 companies on this topic is here to help. Brian also shares his journey with ADHD in the second half of the interview and how it has helped him with his craft. He calls it his superpower and he shares why.  

Tactical tips Brian has done to cut through the noise on social media to be one of the most requested keynote speakers in the world. Enjoy this, please share, subscribe and rate the show I appreciate it.   

About Brian Fanzo  

Brian Fanzo is a digital futurist keynote speaker who translates the trends of tomorrow to inspire change today. His customized and personalized programs showcase real-world stories and examples of forward-thinking people and businesses. He teaches companies of all sizes how to leverage technology in real time in order to engage their customers at the right time.   

Brian has a gift for bringing people together online and offline. He has worked in 76 countries, highlighting his passion for change, collaboration, and technology.   

Brian is currently the Founder of iSocialFanz, which has helped launch digital and influencer strategies with the world’s most iconic brands like Dell, EMC, Adobe, IBM, UFC, Applebee’s, and SAP. Brian has been recognized as a Top 20 Digital Transformation Influencer; a Top 50 Most-Mentioned User by CMOs on Twitter, and a Top 25 Social Business Leader of the Future by The Economist. His followers on social media and podcast downloads rank in the hundreds of thousands, resulting in Brian being an influencer for 19 of the Fortune 100 companies.  

Connect on Linkedin with Brian or on his website https://www.isocialfanz.com/ 

About Glenn Pasch:   

"Everyone finds themselves in charge at some point in their lives. Yet many of us lack the skills to generate consistent results. My goal is to help you learn the skills to adapt and grow in your personal and business life.”  

Glenn Pasch is CEO of PCG Digital, a full service digital marketing agency that specializes in helping businesses create and deliver customers raving, recommending & returning for more. 

He is author of 2 books including "The Power of Connected Marketing" and has spoken and educated audiences throughout the US and internationally.    

 Let’s Connect:   

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glennpasch/​ 

Personal Website http://glennpasch.com/​ 

Company website: https://pcgdigital.com/

Support for this episode comes from P CG digital. It is anywhere from difficult to impossible to manage everyaspect of the changing digital landscape. Rather than trying to do ityourself, why not leave it to an award winning team of Digital MarketingSpecialists who have mastered it all connect your message with morepotential customers with P C digit, go to P C G, digital com for moreinformation and welcome to another episode of yourin charge. Conversations at Spark Change, I'm your host, Glen Pash. So today's episodes focusing on contentand what brands and businesses need to do with content in order to connectwith their consumers. It can be a very confusing idea this this concept of content. It'sso broad. What does that mean? What messages should I be pushing out? Whatstory am I trying to tell what platforms should I be using and, moreimportantly, who in my company should be doing this and what obstacles arethey facing? Well, I brought Brian Fansel Ng to day to help answer thosequestions. Brian Fansel is a well known speaker, content Creator and also consultant tosome of the top companies fortune five hundred fortune, one hundred businessesto help them understand the role of technology where it fits in theircompany, had a leverage technology to tell their story to connect withconsumers so that they get the right message at the right time so that they engage not just now. Buthow do we hold on to those customers long term and make an impression onthem so that they don't think of doing business anywhere else, except withyour company? So, let's dive into today's episode of urine chargeconversations that spare change with Brian Vansa, so Bryan tanks, again for being here,I'm really excited to pick your brain about this idea of content. Now, when Ifirst met you, you know, the idea were sort of your title wascontent creator and you went in and help businesses and as I've gotten toknow you it's that's not an easy label, meaningthat that's just a very broad brush topic to say, content creator, but forbusinesses, when you're going in and they're bringing you in to say, help uscreate content. What questions are you asking them? Andsecondly, what obstacles do you encounter or hesitancy and actuallycreating content to help them yeah? That's I mean I love thatquestion. I think you know part of it for me. You know, I think part of itfrom a standpoint of what does it all mean? How does this all show up is justthe idea of you know when I'm we, when I, when I'm working, especially with abrand, if I brands coming to me or how are positioning it, a lot of it comesdown to you. What is the story? Your currently be you're currently tellingyour clients, like you know, and this can be online and offline right. Ithink that's often like the misconception is that we we only reviewor look at what's you know online, but then you kind of identifying. What doyou know that it's currently working in your positioning, your value,proposition understanding, you know being relatable with your clients asfar as the things are going through, I'm really trying to break down. Likethe nuances of you know, in many cases you funny enough. I think, as manycases for me I'll go to the you know, sales team and say hey when you closeyour best deal. What was the conversation you had where? Where didyou have the conversation? What was the thing that you looked at as pushed youknow something over the edge and most times when they'll tell me that andthen I'll go look at their digital footprint, I'll look at their socialchannels, I'll look at their website. Maybe it's mentioned on like one pageon a blog post or even like on the about page, but it's not something thatis kind of a thread across their entire content and then the other one issometimes when we look at it. Like there's just a lot of noise, a lot ofcontent, you know- I think for me, this is where you content is king. We'veheard that you know phrase for a while, and I think what had happened was wejust started. You know sending email, newsletters, writing blogs doing videojust because someone told us we had to and not only do we get lost in that,but our customers are kind of confused on what does that all mean? Why are wetalking about that? What you you know even they're, unsubscribe and we'redoing some of those things, and so, for me, part of that is like how do we takethat story and get in front of the right audience, but the I think themagic part of this is at the right time. Right like I think most companies canunderstand the right content. They most can understand who the Rightt audienceis, but that right time feature is like...

...the one that can get a little bit. Youknow it takes a little bit of work. It takes a lot of trial and air. It takesa lot of you. Everything from your podcast to a youtube video. You know, Ithink, a lot of times we look at it as the hard part is the content creationand I think the hard part- and this is where I think the biggest hurdle is formost brands- that I work with is the actual getting in front of the rightaudience at the right time, and I think that takes a lot of work. So a couplethings on pack in there yeah. Let's start with that last point. What itsounds like and I've heard this through other content. Creators is yes thecontent, it does take time and needs to be well thought out, but as you'resaying there, it's the distribution. That really isthe hard part because it has to be thought out. So when are we targetingor if what do they do with this piece of content should lead them down adifferent funnel than if they don't interact with this content, and itseems like what I'm hearing is. There's a disconnection between departments like you were saying:Marketing and sales: Do they talk to each other, or this idea of justpushing out content for content sake. So how would someone who's in charge ofall of this? I someone's in charge of all right. I have to handle all this,which part should they be looking at? First, O, that's a good question. I think Ithink part of it is just looking at overall like what is the. What are thetouch points that you're, having with your customers across all of yourdigital channels? Rightly just kind of being honest with yourself, and I wouldeven include what is the data that you've already you gathered from thosecustomers right? I think we oftentimes underestimate the impact of asking acustomer for the same data over and over and over again and right. I thinkabout it from a customers perspective. How many times have we shown up to awebsite? You were logging in and we're like wait a second. Why are they askingfor my email and my phone number for this piece when I purchased ten thingsfrom this co? The place for you know I bought my vehicle from them, and nowthey want me to re, opt in or read things, and so I think that's a goodplace to start is kind of looking at the data you have looking at the touchpoints you have and then I would also say like really looking at when do youwhen does it, it feel, or at least seem that your audience is most engagedright and I think you email newsletters. We think this is one of the few placesthat email news letters have really focused on right, like every emailnewsletter data point that comes out is about. You know the time that you'resending it- and you know you setting it in the morning on Sunday, night orMonday morning, or you know whatever that may be, but we don't think aboutthat in the rest of our content. Right like if, let's just say something isbasic as an instagram post. If you're posting, O Instagram, like the lifetimeof an instagram post, is not very long and if you're posting, let's say you'reposting at your eleven a m during the week. What are you, the people you'retrying to reach? What is their normal habits at eleven am during the weekright? Are they so on that? Yes, they might be checking their phone, but ifyou're asking them to take an action, are they at a place in their life there,or you know, within the world that they're right able to take that actionright and then I think the other piece of this is and to me it's a kind of asoap box of mine is understanding that each different medium is going and eachdifferent network is going to require a different strategy, not because thenetworks are so different but, like, let's just say, you're postingsomething on your on instagram versus linked in. Let's just put those to astwo places. Okay, Instagram, you can guarantee ninety nine point. Ninepercent of the audience is consuming that on a mobile device like to me.That's that's amazing data right. So if we know that someone's looking at thaton a motif ice, I mean no one goes to instron. For the most part, I meanright and if you do it's kind of like a weird Oui. So if we, if we think aboutthat, you're called to action, the time that you're asking someone to do that,even the way that you approach the content needs to be thought of from amobile perspective versus something like linked in where I think the lasttime I saw the data on Linkedin. It was somewhere north of seventy percent.Think seventy three percent are on a desk top or on an ipad when consuminglinked in content, and so when we think of it that way. Okay, maybe it's on atab, but also we have to realize that people usually check in check outlinked in once. Every week people check instagram five times a day right likeso. These little nuances, I think, are extremely important and- and I dobelieve you can take very you- one piece of great content and position iton both channels and find value. But you have to understand those nuances oryouee. We hear this a lot about. Well, you can repost it just put a differentcaption or you'll change, something I don't think it's about the caption orthe photo or like. I actually do believe it's about understanding theunique aspects of each one of those mediums. Like you know, mobile deviceversus not Moitie or o. You Know Hey. I...

...know that people are checking like forme like one of the things that I work, especially from a personal brandperspective. Is I tell people to turn on their notifications for linked in ahundred percent, because for a lot of people when you get a comment on linkedin the next time like if you reply to that comment a day later, the personthat commented might not check into link in again for another week. By thattime they have all these other vocations. They don't even rememberwhat they commented. So for me, like it's, like it's a very high priorityitem where, if some one comments on Linkedin, I always had people test me.I reply within like seconds like thirty seconds, a minute, because I understand,like hey they're on the APP now they're actually engaged. Let me take advantageof that versus instagram. You can check it on those codifications whenever youget to them so that those little things, I think, are the nuances. We have toreally understand a D An, and that was a great tip. I learned that one for me,because I had turned off all of my notifications because it was justblowing up my phone except when you- and I were talking about that and you said linked in. We may check ita lot right. We may but most people, don't they come inevery once in a while once a week, you know high users, don't get don't getoverwhelmed or dissuaded by. You know your circle of friends that are arehigh users of this. That doesn't mean everyone's using this, so I alwaysthought that was a great point and to your point of this idea of making surethat content fits the platform. But going back to what you had saidearlier and I don't want to skip it insist this idea of the story thatyou're telling starting with looking at. What's working, I think the problemwith a lot of content when someone comes in, they think everything's wrong,and we have to change everything versus someone saying. Well, let's audit, whatwe're doing, let's take a breath. Do you even know what you should belooking at looking at it auditing it and then making a plan? And youmentioned that so is that part of one of the things that you do first isgoing in and auditing before we start making changes without question and andfunny enough most people when they're one of the things that surprises whenthey start working with me is, I often have them stop doing more things than Ihave them start doing. A most people are assuming like I'm going to come inand like Oh gosh, we're going to have to do video, we're going to do storiesand, more often than not I'll be like I'm, not sure why we're doing that, andif we don't understand it, and we don't understand if it's working or not,let's pause that just for the moment. So we can examine and I would alsoargue like for all for a lot of us. I think that not only is the audit in thesense of what's working, what's not working but like where what is theattention and the expectations that were putting on our audience, and Ithink that within the audience on understanding like wow, we are we'reasking them to do a lot of things without us, realizing how many thingswere asking them to do. Just Hoitin. Explain that, because it's e is thatmean that, is it mean that certain types ofcontent you shouldn't be asking them to do something? It's more of just anawareness, walk me through that, because I think that's really animportant topic. I don't want to want to breathe through yeah. No, soeverything from you, if we're sending three emails a week right, we're nowwe're now showing up in their inbox three times and and not only askingthem to open it, and even if they're, not opening it we're, also asking themto give us the the headway to not unsubscribe. If one of those emails isnot a value right and then right, even if you think of it from the even fromthat side, where you were going on the hey, what is where other touch points?It's not that we should be doing less of them. We should just be hyper awareof what those things we are asking, because sometimes creating content froma pure educational perspective where we're not asking the audience to doanything can be the best element to set us up for the ask right and I think,for a lot of brands for a lot of leaders. The it's like every threeposts, three posts in a row. Are you know we have a new book coming out orwe're launching a new podcast, or did you know we have a new sale going onrather than coming out and saying did you know you October is this month andit's a wariness month, and these are two things you can do to make yourlives easier right like where our ask it's not US asking it's actually UShelping, and I think that understanding that across the like the nuance acrossthe board is important, and I think, on top of that, the other piece of thiswhen we're looking at, like from an audit from a touch point from our wherethings are going. We also hear a lot about like the life cycle of a customeror a client and those those pieces. They are there, but we also have torecognize that I, if a lot of the things that are happening online today,are happening within what they call dark social right where so and darksocial for the standpoint of it's just social interactions that we can't trackright. So it's someone that sees something in their facebook post. Theyclick the button share and they take the link and they send it to you viatext message or they facebook message to it or they put in an email and email.You the link and say check out this...

...this post did you see this well, sothat's that technically, is that social post is working, but for us that youknow marketers that are trying to track that. There is no way for us to knowthat link came from this facebook post that someone shared via email, and sosometimes I think we we will over calculate like all that post only gotfive views, but we have to like look at like, and this I think, also comes backto asking our customers doing a little reverse engineering like I think youknow, when you have a really happy customer. One of the things we can takeadvantage of is hey. I would love to know like what were the things that ledup to your purchase decision that really helped. You really, you know,really see the light and make that final decision, because we would loveto learn more about that right. Like going to them- because I think it'sfunny for me, like I just paying it for myself- I know that, like you know,Delta Airlines is really good at this and like a weird way like debt owl,like they'll, see I'll, buy three airplane tickets in, like a two dayperiod. They'll send me a survey and within a survey it says Brian, we knowyou're a frequent flier, but we noticed you bought three tickets in a shortperiod of time. was there something? And you know and they'll have the listlike their give away their instagram post the reminder? And for me it'salways like I like jump at the opportunity, share that feedback, and Ithink that's that's one of the ones that we have to kind of look at andeven looking at your sales team and saying you know for most time, sale seawill know like. Oh that person, I've been I've been going and engaging withthem. I've been falling up with email for weeks upon weeks, okay, well, whichone of those emails finally pushed them over the edge or was just a timingissue. I think right. The more we're willing to kind of break things downthere, the easier content creation becomes yeah, and I think that's awonderful point what you said about sales and marketing for some reason ina lot of organizations, they are either so separated or in some waysadversarial right. Sales is going hey marketing.Where are my leads? I got to call people and, and marketing is sayingsales you don't even use the things that I'm giving you, but to your point,is if you sat with your sales people and said not even what one of them is like you're saying whattipped them over what what got their attention, but, more importantly, we,the ones who didn't buy from you, what are their hesitations? What are theirproblems? What are their things that they're struggling with, which then canbe content to address work? You know find, as you said, an educational piecepotentially to say: Hey, here's an article for these people and here andyou're seen as someone who's serving your customers versus just chasing themfor a sale yeah, especially from the standpoint of we know, word of mouthmarketing is so powerful and I think in many cases we don't we don't look atthe like. This person wasn't ready to buy from us, but if we empower them sowell that they that there can talk about us to others, I think we leave alittle bit on the table a especially I look at at that, especially the digitalspace, where someone look at something as like man that I really I don't havethe space for that right now, I'm not you an me sounds like extreme, like aPeloton bike. Great is a very interesting I did a year and a half ago.I did a lot of research, I'm figuring out. If I wanted to get a work fromhome, work out at home or work out in the gym right and after a lot ofresearch. I realized the Peloton I wasn't like. I didn't have enough timeor space or understanding of okay. I look. I get the Peleton right now, butI will tell you about ten times I went to people and, like, Oh, my goodness,you have to get the Palatine bike because of this this and this I didn'teven own it. Yet right and a year and a half later, I ended up buying onebecause things in my world kind of aligned for that, but I was doing wordof mouth marketing for them before I was even owning their product and partof that was because there, when they follow it up on that you, their emailstream, even some of the content they put in my feed. It wasn't about gettingme to buy it. It was about the experience that is continuing to existthere and that don't be there. Whenever I'm there and all of a sudden I waslike well now, I'm not feeling pressure and I'm believing in what they'reactually putting out there versus feeling like like. I didn't, get theemail like ten days later, thirty days later like. Why didn't you buy this?Why didn't you buy this? He was more of like hey. Did you know in our community?We also have guides for people to help from accountability, and we have ahealth, a nutritionist. You know piece that we can have. So I think thateducational, an like understanding that, even if someone's, not the customer atthat moment, they could ultimately do the marketing for you, yeah and- and Ithink that's you mentioned it a few times. I think some of the more successfulcompanies and even clients of mine, they're piloting to having more conversations about theexperience of doing business with them versus just their product, because alot of them are selling similar products at other Individu know, otherbusinesses can sell. So it's really doubling down on. Why should you dobusiness with us? Here's how it's going to be here's, how we're going to be there foryou after purchase. I think that sways a lot of people who are looking atproducts in a similar vein being an automoile, be in an exercise bike, beat a gym, be at a restaurant. The end...

...of the day. A stake is a steak andyou're going to lean back going to maybe a restaurant that you go to younow you bring your daughters to it's about the experience that they have inthe excitement that your your daughters and family will say going to it from anexcitement standpoint or the experience. That's validated on the way back. Idon't think a lot of companies are focused on that experience as well orthinking that it's an important peace versus here's, my product, here's, myprice, oh you didn't, buy here's a hundred dollar gifts or typical. Willthat help you like they just kept camerin that part of the sale yeah? Ithink, and how do you create content around that right? That experienceright, yeah, there's a new brewery, but that opened up by my house and I waslaughing because part of the reason I went there was you know when I knewbrewery pops up for me. It's like! Well, I hope the Beers gonna be good right.You don't ever really know and the photos and the video that they postedon their feed of walking like in and out of the of the restaurant area, andI down the corridor and they had like this like Dj stand, but it's a familyfriendly when there's like board games. I remember that I was going to go therestaurant. I was going to like my favorite brewery, which is down thestreet, and I Amelia was like you know what I'm more in the mood for that andand as much as their beer might be. The thing that they think is the reasonthat I'm going there not beer fan. It was a hundred percent, their ability todocument that experience right. It wasn't every bruty says: Hey we're afun place to go. They'll take like one stock photo of like the the area whereyou're sitting, but I remember this this coming into my feed multiple timesand when it pushed him to shove. I took myself. I went there the very next day.I met my clients there at that restaurant and I'm taking my daughtersthere this weekend and it was all based on them, highlighting that uniqueexperience, but not in a way that was just the generic one, one post andforget it, and I think right little things like that, like I would say,documenting not always just creating, is the other mistake that a lot aremaking where hey just document the things that are happening, how they'rehappening when they're happening and you'd be amazed how easily that contentbecomes the most successful compared to the piece. That's like the perfectlighting of perfect set up with a pre view. I mean even the jeep that Ibought the the jeep that I own now I remember they had the like perfectstock photos all over the all over the website and I'd narrowedit down like three different jeeps, but it was actually a video that was takenby my sales rip, who I had three different sales rap all of them. I wasinteracting with online, who did a video he's like? Oh, you want to seewhat that jeep looks hold on. Let me send you a video he walked out of hisarea, walked down on his phone and did a video just walking around the DEPitsell. Often I had seen all the Gore. You know the photos and all thesepieces, but it was that video. It was two parts of it right. The fact thatthe sales guy was willing to do that for me and to me that felt verypersonalized right. He was like hey. Let me go jump out and and and captorthat video and then second part was. I actually felt the I even felt the showroom because, as he was walking around, I could feel like the environment. Itwasn't just the photos that I saw right on the other channels. Yeah, that's oneof the things we work with a lot of automotive lers and that's one of thethings that we've been most of our clients do that now, because they thinkjust those words that you use. It felt more personal. You put a face to thename and you can actually go. Look. Here's the car. I mean you have thetechnology, so let me just pivot a little bit, because on that note youknow you your story, working in technologyworking for the government military. You know working in technology likewalk me through a little bit of that story, like from that moment to whereyou are now. How did that transition to now being seen as someone who is a indemand keynote speaker, you know, and when we're talking about companies thatyou're working for we're, not talking about like, like you were saying, thebrewery down the street, we're talking fortune, five hundred four one. Onehundred companies walk me through that journey because I think I think theaudience would love to hear that yeah, of course, and you for me, it's been,you know, definitely not a straight line right. I think for anyone that,like is you know, especially with kids right. It's like right. You know I wentto school for Computer Science. I couldn't even get a job in thattechnically out of the gate I got lucky, you know I was wearing for turnyletters in a grocery store after getting off of ups, I worked for upsfor a little over a year after school, and some one saw the fraternity lettersunder new my camp at at the college. I went to and offered me an an entrylevel help dusk job at a government support center, and you know I had totake a pay cut from ups to get that and sure enough. You know. Nine years laterI was running a massive team. You know thirty four direct reports we wererunning. You know. I was traveling to fifty four countries, you three tripsto Iraq, two to Afghanistan and I absolutely loved it and at the time youknow I got promoted and do their promotion ceremony. They were, like youknow, Brian is set for life. Cyber security is taking off Brian is youknow one of the youngest leaders we have in the spaces and for me there wassomething about. I wanted to make a...

...bigger impact. I didn't reallyunderstand what the word bigger impact meant, but I was like if I stay in hisgovernment Gig, it's gonna be a great game. I make a lot of great money, butit's not going to be fulfill me. The way that I was looking for, and so Iactually went and chase what my dream job was, which was a technologyevangelist so that anyone's familiar with Guy Kalasa I and the Apple Story.He was the evangelist for Steve Jobs. He was Steve, jobs, right hand, man,and so, when the went long before the I found long before, you know the MACbook when Apple was trying to compete with windows. His job was to reallyjust build a cult following around people that wanted to talk about this.You know this machine that didn't have a right click button right, the likethe early MAC mouse. You had no right click and I always thought that it wasa cool job because it could be you're helping. You were inspiring yourbringing community together, but I didn't have to sell or market like thatwas actually my like, which is funny how I, where I'm at now as I was like.Oh I don't have to sell a market like that's a sounds like a dream job, and Idid that for two and a half years and during that time is when I kind ofstarted to realize that, even in my days in the government, I was speakingon large stages. Helping you know, kind of the audience see what was going on alot of my talks when I work for the government was how do we attractmillennials or those under the age of forty at the time to to want to workfor the government, but also to help us innovate in a space like cyber securityand to me like that, was such a cool like. I love that as my like role andthen in the data center company that I went and worked for afterwards. I wasreally the one that went to every client we had from Bank of America,Johnson and Johnson Wells Fargo, Sam Song, and I went to them and positionedokay. This is where your technology is today, and this is where you're goingin the future- and I understand we don't have to jump on the future, butwe need to set ourselves up to get there, and so the interesting thing wastwo years. Ten days after I joined that Datus in our company with my dream, job,which was the technology of Vangelist, the company got purchased and they camein to me and were like. I don't understand what your job is as anevangelist. I don't understand why you reported the CEO and, like today's yourlast day- and I remember like- and I was like, the face of the brand like onthe website was my photo. I was one speaking a lot of these big events andit was definitely unexpected. I had just had my we were preparing for my third daughterto be born, and I remember feeling like this idea of okay, not only now whatbut like where. Does this all kind of a line, and when I did some selfawareness and like worked with some mentors of mine, one of the things thatjumped out was, although my career, like the path of all the things I wasworking on, seemed very sporadic. Really. The one true skill, or thething that I kept getting people would rely on me for, was to translate thethe future the technology, the the Geeky side right into something of youknow that managers and leaders could take forward, but also be able to workwith managers and leaders on what they want and then transatlantic that to thecomputer science, the data, the database, individuals and so for methat was kind of like my Aha moment of wait a second. It's my perspective oncertain topics that allow these worlds to come together. And so that's when Ileaned in about seven years ago, to let's try out this full time now. Kino,speaker role and I've been very blessed. You know, I don't have a book out atthe moment. I'm not like a you know, I'm not a Marke name, but I've beenable to know speak at about sixty events a year. I've been to seventy younow. Seventy four countries- and I get you- know a lot of the brands. I workwith you know, and even now, I'm getting a lot of my old government.Work is kind of coming full circle because they're coming back to me now,I'm being like Brian. Where are we going with the future of digital andand what is the role of something you like this creator economy and then Ihave brands like Ibm del Sam Song, Sap. Even you know, BEC I go UFC apple bees.I just look at a big event apart mentalize, which is a large Baltifamily event, and for me, like the interesting part of it, is really whatmy role is and it kind of fits into the title now is I'm a digital futurist,but really what the my like, what I present to the audience is helping themto see a harmony between technology and humanity right and I'm not one thatbelieves technology fixes people problems. I believe people fix peopleproblems and I've leave technology if used correctly and at the right timecan help us scale can help us reach new new new heights that we never imagined.But I really do focus on not technology to replace us as humans, but hey if wecan have a robot that can do this. What can we do as humans now? Can we spendmore time on the customer experience? Can we spend more time replying to ourcustomers that want our attention, and so it's been a definitely aninteresting journey for me, but I mean I couldn't. I couldn't actually seemyself doing anything else for the rest of my life. Just this is it's just onsuch an honor that I get to. I get the testthings out beyond the bleeding edge,but also help businesses focus on what...

...they're doing today, I'm not thefuturist. It's like you know, robots are going to hear it the earth we needto sleep in sleeping pods in the future, like there's a there's, a whole lot ofthose that exist, I'm more of like hey, let's see where we're going tomorrowand make sure that we're planning to day to set us up for that successtomorrow. That's great yeah, because sometimessomeone's going to misunderstand when you say futurist, they're, going tothink o the. What is this weird guy over here, but the one thing justlistening to your talks and hearing you speak. I really think that's a gift in theskill that you do have, which is translating complex thoughts or complex.You know the technologies into actionable terms where someone goes. Oh,that's what we have to do with this. Oh now we can go. Do this and, like yousaid, you can also reverse it and say to the technical people. This is whatthey want to do: Here's how what can we do so? On that note, we, where do you see the next three tofive ten years, when you say this concept of Digital, the digitaladvertising space, digital space of you know what tools were using or no longerusing what? What? What do you see coming down the pipe line? So I thinkthe big language were going to see is web three Dodo or web. Three is kind ofjust like the current thing that we're talking about and what really web threes is kind of leveraging is the blockchain technology which right now,most people kind of link to cryptocurrency is in like that's whatbit coin and the theory Um and those things are built on the block chain- ismuch bigger than that in a sense where really what blockchain is? Is it's adecentralized database or ledger up data that is not owned by any oneperson or anyone? Energy and the beauty of this is- is a very transparentaspect of reinventing the Internet right. The idea today is thateverything was built and not only kind of like a silo, but not many peopleknow the code or the way where your data is stored, inside of somethinglike a facebook or Amazon or how they're sharing that and when we lookat web three Dodo. I think you know it s a lot of its led by this desire forus as consumers, right where we are smarter than we've ever been before. Wehave more data than we've ever been before, and we're willing to makestrategic decisions based on this information that we have. One of thetrends is going to be. As you know, the data is the thing we've been using toget all the free access to the Internet right like every time someone Complaiyour facebook went down a week ago or whatever, or so. I guess it was thisweek, and you know we don't pay for facebook right. We are paying with ourdata that they're using for advertising, because they're technically anadvertising company, but when we think about that, what if we were able todecide who has our data where, where our data stored or even have a betterunderstanding aware, the data fits into this interlect into our own, yourecosystem, because I'm one that you like, I upload my watch data to mydoctor every single week, and it's because I looked at it. It was like. Ican't do a sleep journal for my adhd tracking, but I will gladly give youthis watch data and all of a sudden he is the by my doctor, was like I canbetter prescribe medicine to you based on this information I'm having, but forme there's still not a transparent sharing of okay. Well, now that mydoctor has that, where can I share that somewhere else that maybe my fitness omy fitness coach can then take that same data and kind of bridge on thatand so web? Three really is this idea of empowering the consumers with dataand then layering an element of transparency across the Internet rightand- and it is almost for me- I do look at this as as transformational associal had when social kind of hit the scene and even as transformational aslike the com boom, that we saw, because one of the things that we have to startlooking at is like what does monetization mean in this new futureand even what is the? U K, the whole currency, this crypto currency, part ofthe thing that I looked at like I'm, not a I'm, not a financial advisor, I'm,not one that plays in that space, but the exciting part about something likeCrypto for me is. It removes a lot of the barriers that existed online in thesense of how we exchanged money and goods. Everything was very much from atransactional place right, we're moving much more towards less transactional.You know feelings and the idea of people can buy into something caninvest in a in a creator. Invest in a business, invest even serious. Sere wastalking to me how about that invest and invest in like ultimately,that fan experience, and so like one of the things that I am a bullish on rightnow is that if you are a brand or a business, the idea of always needingmore is going to go away. We don't need more followers. We don't need moresubscribers to our email list. We actually have we're going to be able topull this back a layer and say what, if I provided more for those that arealready our customers that are already our fans and this I can go towards thisidea of your creating deeper value, but...

...also really kind of shifting how weeven think of content creation online, and so this is where I we look at wherewe're going. A lot of this is driven based on consumer behaviors, like theidea that we no longer trust a brand just because they've been around a longtime. I also don't trust the brand because they have a bunch of followersonline like that, like that concept is gone away right. I think the neat partabout this, for me is that I do believe it's a little bit of a level set forall players. You could be a small business that is wanted to be a headwayor you could be a big brand. This feels like you've kind of been disconnected alittle bit from your community. Both I believe, have equal shot at coming backto this, like a thousand true fan, model and kind of leaning in tocreating content conversation, digital experiences that are really focusedtowards your most passionate fans and and audiences, and imagine to me thisis where it gets really exciting. Right, like even I mentioned my jeep beforeright. If right now, I have no connection, I bought my jab a coupleyears ago to my dealership. There's, no, you know, there's a random email thatfollow up that exist, but if there is a if there was a concept where I knewthat, because I bought my deep from this dealership that not only was I apart of a community of others that bought jeeps from that dealership, butthat I, by buying another vehicle from there, I would now have another layerup right. Maybe now I'm going to have a discount, even because I bought twocars from that dealership, I'm going to have some kind of additional benefits.Some of those things exist right. Some of some are doing that work from oursure you customer card, but what what? If we could do that and it could existin the digital landscape right like rather than it being like? Okay, heythe third time you buy a car from us. We give you a discount it's. How do weempower everyone? That's bought two cars from us to feel like they haveexclusivity with us that they don't get anywhere else because a lot of ourcustomers right now, a lot of us in the digital space. We're craving that wewant, we want to people to acknowledge that we exist and we love exclusivity,and I think that is just like the true basis of what we can do online no, andI think that's phenomenal, because we do that. You were speaking about Deltaright as a frequent flyer. You get certain perch, you get certain. Youknow you get to board. First, you get towalk on the blue carpet where other people don't tell where you getshuttled between flights, if you're late, if you're already a certain highlevel. So, as you said, everything escalates the more you participate withthat brand, I think I think more brands who are starting outtoday are thinking that that's a way that they as a new brand, to treatthose customers first out of the gate and appreciate them right out versussomeone who's a legacy brand. Who potentially can be looking at it andsaying? Well, we've been successful doing it this way. Why do we have tochange? I think those are the ones who are going to be more surprised becauseyou're right right now we're at this flux point where you hearabout blockchain. You hear about all of this and you don't really understand it,but you also don't need to yet got soon you will and for those people that aretoo far behind or they're too large to pivot, they may end up really beingimpacted. So let me pivot. We got one or two more things. I want to chat withyou about, and on that point you mentioned your Adhd and one of thethings that I have a lot of respect for you're, very open with that. How it'syour super power, more and more people are sharing moreabout themselves, honestly, sort of that again that behind the scenes, oneof the things I've always loved about your content, I mean even you're, setup right behind you. You know it's not it's! It's! Here's all the PESA! Byturn this way, I have a green screen. O here's my board over here or you know,you've done the go pro and all over, and I think that allows people to seewhat really it means to be a creative person. So same thing with this withyour adhd. Why did you decide to share that and how, as it impacted otherpeople or the feedback that you've been getting from people because you're soopen about it? Well, I thank you for bringing that up.You know is something important and a driving force for me. You knowinteresting enough. I was diagnosed at thirty one years old, so it was nineyears ago that I was diagnosed. I remember the day like it was yesterday.I know the clothes I was wearing. I know where I parked my deep in theparking lot like. That was that, because there was a day for me that Iwent from feeling like I was broken for most of my life to just feeling like Iwas reminded that I was different and when I say that it's I was extremelysuccessful. Post college schooling- It was very tough for me and I couldn'tever figure out why I people would say imagine if you applied to yourself andI was like- I was trying as hard as I could and couldn't solve. Some of thesethings that existed and so being diagnosed was a big. It was a big. It'sprobably on the only time in my life, I felt a weight lifted off of me like Iremember that feeling, but I will say...

...there wasn't like. Okay, now I'm goingto go change the world. With this conversation it was actually threeyears later, I was on stage and I had really not talked about my Ahduc at alllike it was like I was medicated. I understood I started to be a little bitmore into the mental health space. You know from a from like trying tounderstand its role with technology, but I was actually giving one of thelargest key notes. I've ever given my entire life, I was at a Amazon webservices, the AWS event in Muscone inside of San Francisco, and after mysixty minute cenote, I was doing a kind of a Qa with the audience and some oneasked wow. You are like really your energy, you talk fast, you have a lotof things going on, but I can't get enough like you must have adhd orsomething- and I was like the person's question like from the audience and Iremember being like well. Actually I do. I was diagnosed a couple of years agoand I realized that it now impacts every part of my life, but it's alsothere's ways that I'm turning into my superpower and part of my greatness arethe things that Ahd enables, and you know- and I went on and asked a couple.Other questions answered a couple, other questions and then afterwards youknow after go offstage here's a line of people that are waiting for you. Youknow I remember, I give a sixteen Aquino that I thought it was reallyreally well designed. I would say eighty five percent of the people thatcame up afterwards talked about my answer, mentioning Ahd, and it wassomeone that had a daughter with dyslexia, someone that had actuallystruggled with autism and she didn't want to tell anyone around her, and Iremember and the day actually out. I was four people left in the line andthere's this lady. I could see her like. I was talking to somebody. I could seeher the next person to talk to me and she was on her phone on face time and Iremember feeling like that's kind of rude like you're waiting in line andtalk to me and you're on like this is out. We like awkward right and so likethat person I was talking to you left and I walked on was like ma'am. Youwant me to skip you and come back she's like no. No no she's, like I have myson on face time, and I just told him what you shared about your adhd onstage and he's going through some things he's twenty one years old andhe's decided that he doesn't want to go to his college classes anymore, becausehe's ashamed by some of the the things that that exist. He has to deal withanxiety and a couple things and I end up grabbing a phone, and you know itwas very awkward for him because he's like mom, you know the twenty one yearold kid. What has his mom like handing his phone to some random speaker kid?You know, and I just like kind of had a normal conversation and asked him acouple questions. He asked me a couple questions and at the end he was justlike he's like, but why like? Why are you like putting it out there, and Iwas like well honestly for me, the more open I am about it, the less power itgives others to hate on me for it or to judge me, and ultimately, it allowspeople to better understand the things that I'm going through and in manycases gives them permission to admit what they're going through, and Iremember him I kind of like nodding his head, and I just said something youknow is very casual at the end, I was like tell you what I'll include it inevery intro for every time. I take the stage, if you're willing to take afresh approach to how you look at this and make sure that you're not lettingthis one limitation prevent you from showing up, and he said yes of course,and and since that day, so since that day, I've put it into my pro. You knowit's been part of my my you know my bio and someone introduces me on stage, butit really was the last three years that I kind of leveled it up, probably alevel that most people are seeing now and a lot of that had to do with themore I shared about my adhd. Not only did it did it help others kind of admitthe things they have going on, but it allowed those that, like might look atthings that are going on in my life as like me, like Brian, why aren't youreplying to my text like? I know that you saw the text you're on twitter oron instagram you're, not replying well for me like the way that our adhdbrains work. Part of it is it's not that I don't look at that as a priority.It's just that my brain doesn't stack tasts. Everything is an even plain, andso when other things come up, it just pushes things along and so there'sother things could be basic and mundane, but just the way, the way that brainworks, and so three years ago I kind of started leading into a Moor and thenabout eighteen months ago my middle daughter was diagnosed adhd andDyslexia, and that was a whole nother. You know I got to see it through itdad's eyes. I also got to see it through well what if I was diagnosed ather age? What would I have wanted? How can I approach that? And that meant alot to me and truthfully- I haven't really shared this much publicly yet,but it's something that it's coming out is based on going through that with mydaughter, I went through testing for dyslexia and was diagnosed now withjust lexy myself and the interesting part of that is I'm a host in MC forsome of the biggest events in the world and part of the thing I learned foryears was: I struggle pronouncing some people's last names and what I did was.I came up with my own way where I would go to them and say: What are yourfriends call you? What's a nickname, I want to introduce you by that and theyeveryone always thought that was me hyper personalizing. Really it was me.It was me covering for something that I struggled with right. I was like it wasa coping mechanism that, like everyone I introduced, I always use a slang ortheir nickname, because then I didn't have to mess up their last name, and sothat interesting part of that for me...

...and where we're at today- and I thinkthe pandemic taught us this more than anything else right like no but ematter. What your job title is no matter how much money you make for aliving. It's not going to stop your kid from walking behind your zoom callright. It's not going to it's, not G H, like the human condition that existsaround like we all have those things that are going on, and so I think thebeauty where we're at right now and where I ahd shows up for me, was thatthat I don't need people to stop or to change everything to work with me, butif, if they understand how I work best- and I understand how you work best andwe can meet in the middle, I believe that's how we can all look at all thethings in our lives. Like my my main focus for it now is. I want everyone tolook at their vulnerabilities that they have and shift their mindset ratherthan thinking of is a vulnerability. Think of it. What things does thatvulnerability in power that only I can do and it's a you know it's a beautifulspace ran. I think mental health as a priority right now is such a refreshingthing. I grew up in a house that you know medicine mental health. You knownone of those things were ever discussed or you know existed yet. Mydaughters know at twunty in the afternoon there's time for Daddy, Itake a second dose of at or all like. They know that in like in theconversation, because I want them to know that I know I am not perfect inthings like that exist, so yeah. For me, IT'S A it's a beautiful like arenawhere we're at and and ultimately I think, the reason I'm so ave- and youknow loud about it- is less about the ADHD. But it's more about hey. I justwant to give everybody permission to be be okay and be proud of who they are,and that includes the things that are or donabit now and and what's reallywonderful about that is my youngest son same thing diagnosed to Adhd anddyslexia and you know, he's doing fine, but you know once you unlock that hethen all of a sudden they go. Oh and my oldest one we tested, because once wetested the youngest one for dislike, who we noticed the older one was having and all of a sudden and what I lovedabout what you said it was it was. It made sense all of a sudden. You realizewhy you struggled you know like he was saying. Oh, that makes sense why it wasso hard and he's in a student, and they were saying do you know how hard it iswith what he has to be able to do that, and so I would talk to him. He says wow,you know, I don't know, I just kept doing it figuring it out. Now, all of asudden he'll say it. Oh I'm dyslexic, and but it was permission to say. Ohthat was hard, but, more importantly, now they're getting strategies to helpthem move forward to be able to do that. So I think you to your point, the morethat you talk about it and the other thing I I really loved about it. Is Yougive it less power over you? When you talk about it, you know it's like Nemright now in my I I talked about it, then you can't think of it because itdoesn't bother me, so you look silly doing that, but I think and I've seen the reaction to yourreally. You know your strength and willingness to stand up there and andbe that person that other people can look at and be able to say well if hedid this look what I can do and, more importantly just to have that impact tosay we all have something so call what it is and move on figureout the strategy- and I think that's just incredibly incredibly admirablewhen I and when I saw that, and so I wanted to touch base on that onebecause thank you, Er Nal, to me, but I see the passion that you have it foryou as well, so and and I'll sit just requst throw in there. I had someonethis past week, one of the biggest name, people that I am even in the circle ofin the industry that I've looked up to for years. Send me a direct message, Ove, a twitter and said: Hey. Can I on the phone with you- and I will tell you-I was one of those moments of we're sure, of course, when we have adiscussion and- and she opened up that she was diagnosed with some autism andshe's, going through some things that, and I will tell you the the feeling that the information sheshared with me and how the fact that someone had turned her on to myopenness with adhd before she went through the testing and that connectionto like. Oh Hey, there are people that are owning it that are successful in. Ilove that you mention with yours with your son. You know that the the reasonI believe a lot of this is also coming to light was there are a lot of thingsthat were misdiagnosed or assumptions right like I was the youngest senior VPever in a company of Twenty Zan people in a government contractor, and when Iwas diagnosed I was it still was like the Oh, my God goodness, like imagineall the things that I to the point of me having to change the way I saidpeople's last names. Are you almost develop hes coping, but I will also sayyou know: I'm a Busne, I'm all for business right and people will oftenask and I've had this discussion a lot on Brian. Your Adhd. Do you think itlike makes things worse or harder like people are going to judge and- and Iknow that people are probably going to judge and there- maybe people that will,if there's equal grounds and they're like Oh, you know, I'm gonna have Brianmight need you know there might be some...

...more thing. I'm okay understanding that,but I will say for me the conversations the connections that it'sopened up by simply just explaining the things I'm going through have been lifechanging and like that phone call this past week- and I mean she broke down intears- and this is so one that I hold on like the highest of all high pepedestals and and we're going to we're going to do the story together. Shewants me to to we're going to do a piece of content together on it. Butfor me it was, I even told her than was like. I don't tell anyone that youcalled or that this conversation happened like I want you to go on yourown journey she's like no she's, like don't mention my name yet until we puton a piece of content on it and like make something on it, but she's like no,that you've changed the way that I'm even going through this to understandthe way to look at it, and I mean for me like in, like my like the why I'mdoing all of this was that phone call alone right. There was something that Iwould have I wished. I had someone to call nine years ago, when I wasdiagnosed, I just said: Hey you got these things going on, you have to ownit and so yeah. I just want to show that because like because I think alsoin this, like world of business, we're at right now there are a lot of thingsthat you have to do. Risk first reward right like what's the risk of mesharing this about me. What's the rewards of me sharing and I thinkoftentimes rewards, we sometimes look at the rewards and like the well,people are going to better understand me individually or or no now, I'm youknow if I don't reply to an email, someone's gonna give me a little bitmore grace, but I think the rewards is like that human aspect like that, likejust like that, someone that I was there for someone that I didn't evenknow knew why it was right. Many ways like to me: that's the beauty of whatwe're doing on line like even you share right there about your kids and gettingthem both tested right. There are. A lot of people are like, oh well now, ifyou are getting them tested, if, if glanis looking at that, maybe I need togo back and approach that, because it's not about everything, we've done upuntil this day being wrong. It's just. We are at a place now where we canapproach things differently and we can go at them in a way that maybe we'llshift a dialogue, because our schools in our corporate world are broken whenit comes to setting up for neuro drivers. Success Right. They are notbuilt for that at all right now and I don't believe they will be until wemove the conversation into the Public Forum because they, I don't blame themfor not being built for near diversity, because if you were norder, which islike for those that don't you know it's all of the different things from autismto Dyslexia, to anxiety to adhd. The the all of the the new at ever conceptis that your brain just works differently, yeah and why you godifferently, yeah and and for me, like I mean I'm, a very emotional personright and I'll just show this last piece like I was a kid I played collegehockey. I was very successful in sports. Every sport I played in high school inI tried out for a team. I made it, but I was never the best. I was always. Iwould always say, like I was probably the smartest on the floor. I could seethe most right and now I know why, but I was one that if a coach yelled at me,I took it so personally I would start crying right. I would tell you I'm acollege hockey player on the bench. My software year were undefeated and thecoach Berates me about my position and I just start bawling like full on tiers.So we all know that locker room is cry, baby, Fansel Ke, you know, and but forme the tears were how I I because I took everything personally but then Iwas always the one that would be able to sit with it. Look at the coach andgo put me out there I'll prove you wrong. This time. I would jump out, andI learned now looking back, there are a lot of people that have that same likeregent, rejection, sensitivity, disorder like I have that are veryemotional, but they have not got to a place where they're comfortable withoutletting it externally exist, or the amount of kids. Today, the amount ofpeople today that take that and personally go sit by themselves andstruggle. You know in those dark closes of dark rooms. For me when I startedjust like kind of like leaning, Hey, it was just who I am and what I was allabout. The idea of that now like if I could just go back in new and college,Hey Brian, the therre parts of your brain. Like a D D, we did a brain scan.My parts of my brain are flipped and a part of my brain that usually wouldtrigger for someone to take in that feedback and take that from like a now,a responsive is where my emotions are set, and so, like my crying is me meaccepting and it's nothing I'm doing wrong right right now of times I wastold as a kid suck it out. Brian Boys don't cry in the baseball field, Brownyou got to be kidding, I was I was taken home and it was I it was none, nofault of anyone. That was doing it at the time but like for me like. That islike the example of like understanding now, if we give people permission tounderstand themselves in those moments, you won't go into those dark closets.You will kind of accept that and and for me, if I can, if just sharing thisonce in one podcast, one episode impacts one person, you know I feel,like everything has been worth it no and, and I think the conversation andyou are standing there and mmy...

...understanding. Now you know it's justan idea, if you think about it, just from a very simple level or the way Ithink about it is that you know it's like a computer, his brain processes,information differently than someone else's and that's okay, because within you know, if we stop with the labelslike that's bad. Well, no, not really, because when I see other people who nowI know have that they're, some of the most productive, focused individualslike they'll, sit there and they'll. Do the research and they'll get it done,but in this other arena they might be a little more awkward where, on the flip,you're really great in this one. But you struggle over here, so it's gettingaway from the labels of good or bad just starting to put your arms around.What does this person need to be successful? They need a little moretime. They need a little more. They need some reminders. This person needsyou to pack them on the back this person you're right. I think that'swhere you're. What you were saying is businesses in schools, because it'sstill built on a factory mentality. If we need everybody to be doing it, sortof the same way, because it's easier to manage than a thirty, whatever size,classroom or business, I have a team of forty people. I can't worry abouteverybody's little, but that's really what leadership Ithink is going to have to evolve into to understand those people, becausegreat leaders do understand that and they do give the people that space tounderstand that I don't talk to Brian First thing in the morning, because ifI bother him he needs to, he needs to set his day up or this other person. IfI don't say good morning to them, they think I'm mad at them and their massducked for the whole day right. That's really what we have to get to, but Ithink the more that especially people who are viewed assuccessful, and I that's again why I have suchadmiration for what you're doing, because people will look at you and say:Oh he's got it made, look at that because they're looking at the external,they don't know one the struggles that you've gone through and then now all ofa sudden, you unlocking that to go. Oh that's why it was a pain in the ass incollege now and now you're going okay. Now Ican think, but I would challenge- and this is we're always looking inhindsight two thousand and twenty. If you had been giving that those thingsat early college or early on, would you be the person you are today? Probablynot probably yeah you're right, you know you got to look at it and say well.If so, then I'd be somewhere else and then yeah, maybe I would be having animpact, but maybe I would have stayed in that military job forever and notchallenge myself and that would have been great, but look at the impact thatyou're having right now, one for all the people who listen to your content.For yourself for your family, I mean it's easy to look in hindsight. Wethink that if we change it will be where we aretoday, but just better an I always going. You probably wouldn't be here,and so that's something so again, it's I tell you it's some like four years togo from. Why did no one tell me that W Y, what would my life be different towow? All of that allowed me to get to where I'm at right and- and I would saythe two people that have been throwing out a lot samonies gymnast, you knowyou know and Michael Phelps are both adhd diagnosed. They are both beenmedikit since they were young and when you look at success, you look at drivemotivation. You know commitment, you know a lot of the things that oftentimes were like. Oh, you can't have this because you're successful you'redriven you're accountable, they had people around them that like took over.You know things that, like hey, if I struggle with this, this is somethingthat I need someone else to help me with, and I think for anyone that'slike in this dialogue. I love that the idea that we do have to approach thingsas not going back but being like. Okay, all of this happened for me to get toher and now what can we do with this moving forward? And I think it's a bade forward. Absolutely because that's the Kay, we have a tendency to lookbackwards and say well. Why did I have to go through this struggle in insteadof saying I am who I am today through that struggle now that I've realizedthis? What can I do to move my life forward,my families, but also to help others, because you know, if, if to your point,if I could standing on stage, inspires one person? If I share, you know whatmy children go through and that allows someone else to go. Oh Wow, this is howyou did that. I mean, I think, that's where we had. We have a responsibilityto share that message out, especially if we're in a position as you arestanding on stages in front of people that is probably having as much impactas anything that you can help people with technology, because really one ofthe things that you always say is you're connecting the people and yourfocus on the people. You know it could be hey folks, one ofthe other things is a company you got...

...to focus on is focusing on your people.In this way I mean it's really amazing, so all right so first off I want tothank you for this. At the end of every episode, I usually just ask five or sixquestions. I call them the one meaning first, first thing that pops in yourhead, we like to get some more behind the scenes, so don't overthink this sofirst thing would be. I know you talked about beer and I know you talked to youlove Pittsburgh, but what's the one food that is just your go to got tohave got a, I love it love it love it all. The time to Potley I am A. I amgot chipotle lover, always a like, since the very first time I ever had itto where, like that is my and I M, I used to consider myself a picky eater,I'm a selective, eater now and to pull like the perfect place for that right,because I could like choose how I want it and they kind of do it. So you hadto pull. I would be the easiest answer. Okay, now you've mentioned a coupletimes in is in your bio to that you have been to seventy six countries sothat this question usually is easier to ask. But where's the one place that youhaven't traveled that you would love to go to Bali H. I want to go to bally,I've never been. I've had two opportunities, and unfortunately oneGod canceled and one I missed a flight, and so bally would be number one with allwithour companies and Bali. We got to get you to get Brian Down there tospeak and help you out there. What's the book or something you're listening toor something that's in inspiring you right now that you'd like to share withother people, well we're on a podcast, so I'llmention you know my current fair podcast. It's been in my favorite for alittle while now is arm. Chair expert well back shepherd up YEP, and it's-and I will say you know it might Ono's Jack Shepherd who was famous for Punkto his wife is Christen Bell. Who Most people know you know, is the voice offrozen she's? Also, you know a famous movie actress, but his ability tointerview on that show and talk about you have celebrities. Have these bigname people open up, but also have very difficult conversations around Aa andthings that I just don't see a lot. I feel like I listen to that podcastfifty percent for the content and fifty percent to learn how to like, listenbetter like his ability to listen to either. What's not being said or beingsaid, oftentimes makes these interviews some of the most compelling. You knowthings that are out there and it's really my. I block it off on mycalendar on Fridays, when the new episode comes out just to listen tothat podcast. That's how much it's helped me both personally andprofessional. No, I like that one. My wife loves that one too. She doesn'tlist to many listen to many podcast, but that's one of them, because shealso likes the interaction between the two of them, yes or honesty, and itreally feels like you're sitting listening to a very personalconversation. So I think that's great okay. We got two more if I brought all of your friends, closefriends, family who know you, and I ask them to describe you in oneword. What would that be passionate? I think that's a good one, yeah yeahyeah, that's and I would say five years ago. I would have taken thatas the wrong way I would have been like so I'm not smart or athletic ortalented, I'm just passionate in like I'm like covering it. For that, likethat's how I used to take that in right, and I had to really reexamine like thatword and understand the piece of it. So even it's saying that like to me, iskind of like a it's also like how we have to like approach how people lookat us, because I am I wake up happy, go to bed happy. I kind of live this way,and I'm blessed of that. You know it kind of shows o shines as late. That'sgreat last one we've talked about a lot of different things on here and again.I want to thank you for your time. I've been really waiting to get you on here.For a while out of everything we've talked about,if there was one thing that you would want the listeners to walk away withone lesson, one topic: one idea: What would be the one thing you want them totake away from our conversation today? It would be to have an open mind set tothe role technology is going to play in their lives. An open mind set torecognize that technology is not there's not at all or nothing solutionout there. No technology in the no innervation in the history of time hashas been able, like fix bad people, from doing bad things with it, likeeven the light ball. The idea, like the light bulb and that how it could beused for evil, and I think we oftentimes will look at technology andin many cases, hate it, because we don't understand it or we're notwilling to change, and I would just challenge us. I believe there are a lotof things happening in the world around us in the technology landscape that aregoing to give us abilities to feel free to feel like we can. You know openthese new doors into like our lives and the things that's possible, but reallyitt comes down to you have to first...

...have a mindset to where you know: Hey,let's see what role this technology can play in my life and and doesn't meanthat every technology is going to work, every technology is going to fit, orit's the best at that time, but I think the mindset being open to what'spossible is where we really can do ourselves of favors. That would be thething for me. That's great and I think that could be. You know, remove theword technology and just put because I think a lot of people don't understandthings in their first. Initial reaction is to hate before they understand. Ithink that in so thanks again, but let's, let's give theaudience some places where they can connect with you, I'm sure again andlisten audience Brian is phenomenal. I'm sure he will reach back out to orconnect with you. So where can they find you yeah? You know I quit a lot ofcontent on every channel, so I always say I pick your favorite, you socialchannel. My account is I social fans, so I social fans with the Z at the endthere, so I social fans play on my last name is my account everywhere andanywhere, and then you know I looking for Speaker Brian Fan Zoom. Is he thespeaker website and then you know. I have my own Creator coin, which is inthis Crypto blockchain space and I'm rolling out some ftes around thatconcepts of some really cool digital components, all around the idea beingsuper powered, and so the coins name is adhd. Of course we got to connectedthat. So if you go to ADHD COINCON US AHD, coincon it'll, redirect you tothis site you'll see a lot of the benefits I have for those that areholding the coin. But for me it's the it's the best way possible to step intothis space. You don't have to have like a digital wallet. You don't have tounderstand all these nuances. It's a it's a company that that reached out tome about six months ago and I just have had a pleasure working with so there'ssome cool things that were an offer for those that are holding the point. Somecool give backs that we're going to have we're going to have some cool swag.I have a couple of cool guests that we're going to bring into thatcommunity so yeah, so I social fans everywhere Brian Fanson, the websiteand yeah check out adhd Coin Com and you'll be able to see what I have goneover there thanks again for having me Glin we'll have them we'll have themall winked up into the show notes as well. So everyone thanks so much forwatching a please make sure you subscribe to the podcast on Apple Or,if you're, an android user on spotify, you can jump over to the YoutubeChannel and watch our conversation as well. I appreciate your attention.Please remember, to share this out, especially this episode. I think thisis a very impactful episode. There's probably a lot of people out there whocould really benefit from what Brian and I were talking about, has always Iappreciate your attention, as they say at the end of every episode, you're incharge, O Brian just gave you a few more tools to help you become moresuccessful, both professionally and personally. Thank you so much. I lookforward to seeing you on the next episode. Brian again, thank you so muchchers.

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